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Indian Health Service The Federal Health Program for American Indians and Alaska Natives

Division of Grants Management
HHS-2010-IHS-SDPI-0005

Billing Code: 4165.16

Department of Health and Human Services

Indian Health Service

Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention

Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI)

Diabetes Prevention and Healthy Heart Initiatives

Funding Opportunity Number (FON):  HHS-2010-IHS-SDPI-0005

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number: 93.442

Key Dates

Application Deadline Date: September 10, 2010

Objective Review Dates: Week of September 20, 2010

Anticipated Date of Award: September 24, 2010

I.      Funding Opportunity Description

Statutory Authority

The Indian Health Service (IHS) is accepting applications for fiscal year (FY) 2010 competitive cooperative agreement funding previously listed as grants funding for the Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI) Healthy Heart and Diabetes Prevention initiatives, previously known as the SDPI Demonstration Projects.  This competitive announcement is open to all existing SDPI grantees that have a current SDPI grant in place and are in compliance with the previous terms and conditions of the grant.  This program is authorized under H.R. 6331 “Medicare Improvement for Patients and Providers Act of 2008” (Section 303 of Public Law 110-275).  The program is described in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CDFA) under 93.442.

 

Background

In 2004, in response to Congressional direction, the IHS implemented the Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI) Demonstration Projects.  The Demonstration Project grant programs have developed and implemented comprehensive diabetes prevention and cardiovascular disease risk reduction interventions, community awareness activities and evaluation plans.

Thirty-six (36) grant programs were selected to implement the Diabetes Prevention Program which adapted and implemented the curriculum from the National Institutes of Health Diabetes Prevention Program.  The Demonstration Project funds provided the resources to build stronger diabetes prevention programs through the implementation of a common structured diabetes prevention education program.

Thirty (30) grant programs were selected to implement the Healthy Heart Demonstration project which focused on reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) who already have diabetes. This program implemented a clinical, team-based, case management approach to treat risk factors for cardiovascular disease. 

Purpose

The primary purpose of this Cooperative Agreement is to provide funding to selected SDPI grantees to continue or newly implement one of the two programs and to document activities and outcomes.  One program is called the Diabetes Prevention Program with primary prevention of diabetes as its goal.  The other program, the Healthy Heart Project, is aimed at cardiovascular disease risk reduction in AI/ANs with diabetes.

Another purpose of this Cooperative Agreement is to disseminate information and best practices from the original SDPI Demonstration Projects into other AI/AN IHS, Tribal and urban Indian health settings.   Both the Diabetes Prevention Program and the Healthy Heart Project award recipients are expected to participate in dissemination activities under this Cooperative Agreement.

II.     Award Information

TYPE OF AWARDS: Cooperative Agreement.

ESTIMATED FUNDS AVAILABLE: The total amount identified for Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 is $23.3 million.  Awards under this announcement are subject to the availability of funds. In the absence of funding, the agency is under no obligation to make awards that are selected for funding under this announcement.

ANTICIPATED NUMBER OF AWARDS: The estimated number of awards will be approximately 66, which will be divided between the Diabetes Prevention (DP) and Healthy Heart (HH) initiatives.

PROJECT PERIOD: 2 years

AWARD AMOUNT: DP and HH grantees who are currently receiving $324,300 should budget for the same amount; DP and HH grantees who are currently receiving $397,000 should budget for the same amount.  New SDPI applicants for DP and/or HH funding should apply for a $324,300 base amount.

A.     Cooperative Agreement

These awards are being made as Cooperative Agreements because they entail substantial post award IHS programmatic participation in the conduct of the project.  Award recipients will be monitored to ensure compliance with the goals and required activities detailed below.  IHS will halt activities if requirements are not met.  Any changes in program requirements will be discussed through a collaborative process with final approval resting with the IHS Director’s Office.

Overall Structure

The overall structure of the SDPI Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and Healthy Heart Project (HHP) includes:

1.     IHS Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention (DDTP) -general oversight, coordination and leadership;

2.     IHS Division of Grants Management - general oversight of cooperative agreement administration, financial audits, monitoring and reporting;

3.     Award recipients - approximately 66 distributed between each of the two initiatives; and

4.     Coordinating Center -responsible for day-to-day coordination of data collection, management and analyses; certain logistics related to program activities; programmatic and data collection training; technical assistance and support; and communications.

Role of the SDPI DPP or HHP grantee award recipient:

  • Work with the Federal Project Officer(s) and designated assignee (SDPI Coordinating Center) in the development and implementation of all areas of activities supported by this cooperative agreement;
  • Comply with all terms and conditions of the award and satisfactorily perform activities to achieve the program goals;
  • Consult with and accept guidance and respond to requests for information from the Federal Project Officer(s), the Grants Management Specialist(s), and other relevant Federal staff;
  • Agree to provide DDTP will all required data;
  • Produce all required reports according to timeline; and
  • Keep Federal program staff informed of emerging issues, developments and challenges.

 

Role of the DDTP staff and designated assignee (SDPI Coordinating Center):

  • Review and provide input in the development and implementation of all areas of activity supported by this cooperative agreement;
  • Review and approve key personnel;
  • Review critical project activities for conformity to the mission of the IHS and compliance with the requirements of this award;
  • Provide guidance on project implementation, as needed;
  • Approve data collection plans;
  • Facilitate collaboration, as needed; and
  • Assume overall responsibility for monitoring the conduct and progress of the SDPI Diabetes Prevention and Healthy Heart programs and for making recommendations.

 

B.     Award Recipient Responsibilities

1.     Diabetes Prevention Program

 

Applicants must provide a plan for identifying, recruiting, screening and retaining individuals with prediabetes.

a.     Participant Eligibility

Individuals recruited to participate in the activities of the Diabetes Prevention Program must meet the following eligibility criteria:

i.      Inclusion criteria

Age > 18; and 

Diagnosis of Prediabetes - one of the following glycemic measures in the prediabetes range:

  • Fasting blood glucose 100 – 125 mg/dl (Impaired Fasting Glucose, IFG)
  • 2-hour glucose 140-199 mg/dl (Impaired Glucose Tolerance, IGT)
  • A1c of 5.7% – 6.4 %  (high risk for diabetes)

 

Program activities should include screening activities to find individuals with prediabetes and to screen individuals with the following risk factors:

  • Family member with type 2 diabetes (parents or siblings with diabetes)
  • Overweight defined as BMI ≥25 kg/m2
  • Age ≥ 35
  • Habitual inactivity (no regular physical activity, less than 30 minutes 3 times per week)
  • Previous diagnosis of Prediabetes (Impaired Fasting Glucose, IFG or Impaired Glucose Tolerance, IGT)
  • History of Gestational Diabetes or delivery of a baby weighing > 9 lbs
  • History of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

 

ii.      Exclusion criteria – individuals not eligible to participate

  • Current diagnosis of pregnancy
  • Active alcohol or substance abuse by provider judgment that would affect successful participation
  • End Stage Renal Disease on dialysis
  • Previous diagnosis of diabetes (not eligible for diabetes prevention)
  • Current diagnosis of cancer undergoing treatment that prohibits participation – provider judgment
  • Any other significant or unusual condition or life situation that makes it likely that the participant will not be able to participate

 

b.     Recruitment

i.      Settings for recruitment can include community or clinical settings.

ii.      Methods of recruiting individuals to participate could include, but are not limited to, community activities and events, advertisements in local media sources and clinic/health/wellness facilities, targeted mailings from existing records, targeted home visits by Community Health Representatives, identification and referral by clinical staff, family events.

iii.     Recruitment goal - 48 participants per year.     

c.     Retention

i.      Retention activities to promote continued participation such as group events and field  trips, newsletters tracking progress, incentives, competitions, raffles, healthy food at activities, role model success stories, recognition of achievements (graduation), items displaying program identification, motivational postcards, contracts, reminder mailings or phone calls, motivational speakers, buddy system, talking circles.

ii.      Identification and removal of barriers to participation such as child care, elder care, family involvement in activities, transportation and parking, flexible scheduling, employer approval for activities during working hours, extra sessions, evening sessions, community awareness of program.

iii.     Retention goal - 100% of participants

d.     Description of Diabetes Prevention Program Activities

Award recipients will be required to implement all components of the activities described below and provide a work plan and time frame chart to that effect.

i.      Intensive Activities - individuals diagnosed with prediabetes will undergo an intensive diabetes education intervention similar to the NIH Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP).  The key components, strategies and target goal of this educational intervention include the following:

  • Intensive education curriculum modeled after the NIH DPP 16-week curriculum but using a group approach, taught by a diabetes educator and/or nutritionist and/or physical activity specialist, weekly for 16 weeks.
  • Individual coaching sessions - participants will meet with coach monthly during curriculum and quarterly thereafter to review progress, encourage retention, use tool box strategies for motivation/retention, and meet with family at least once.
  • Strategies include at least 150 minutes per week of physical activity, 1200-1800 kcal/day (determined case-by-case), and < 25 percent of calories from fat. 
  • Target goals: 7% weight loss and maintenance.

 

ii.      After-Core Activities - monthly (minimum quarterly) follow up with participants after the 16 week curriculum.  Some examples of follow-up include in-person visits, phone contact, group activities, cooking classes, DPP refresher classes.

iii.     Less Intensive/Community/Group activities -individuals with prediabetes and those at risk for diabetes will participate in community-based awareness and motivational activities such as monthly walks, health fairs, competitions, etc.  Families can participate in these activities, and diabetes prevention awareness activities should be incorporated.  These activities provide an opportunity for the award recipient to tailor activities to community needs.

iv.     Documentation of outcomes and activities include an assessment and questionnaire at baseline, immediately after completion of the DPP curriculum, and annually on the anniversary of the first DPP curriculum class.  Assessments include medical clearance for participation (should include physical exam and may include cardiac clearance for physical activity and ECG for high risk individuals), clinical measurements (weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure), lab tests (lipid profile, glycemic measurement, urine albumin:creatinine ratio), clinical history, and prescribed medications.  The questionnaires address health and health behaviors.  The evaluation is not as extensive as it was in the SDPI Demonstration Projects and is intended to provide basic information to evaluate the program and demonstrate accountability to stakeholders, including Congress. 

 

e.     Trainings, Meetings, and Conference Calls

Award recipients are required to attend all related trainings, meetings, and conference calls offered or recommended by DDTP and the SDPI Coordinating Center.  A minimum of four conference calls per year are anticipated.  Recipients should plan on four trips per year for trainings and meetings and budget accordingly.  Scheduled meetings will be held in Albuquerque, New Mexico or Denver, Colorado.

 

2.     Healthy Heart Project

Applicants must provide a plan for identifying, recruiting, and retaining individuals with diabetes.

a.     Participant Eligibility

Individuals recruited to participate in the activities of the Healthy Heart Project must meet the following criteria:

i.      Inclusion criteria

Age> 18; and

Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes

For individuals with diabetes, one glycemic measure in the diabetes range:

  • Fasting blood glucose > 126 mg/dl
  • 2-hour glucose >200 mg/dl plus symptoms of diabetes
  • A1c > 6.5

 

Program activities should include screening activities to find individuals with type 2 diabetes and to screen individuals with the following risk factors:

  • Family member with type 2 diabetes (parents or siblings with diabetes)
  • Overweight defined as BMI ≥25 kg/m2
  • Age ≥ 35
  • Habitual inactivity (no regular physical activity, less than 30 minutes 3 times a week)
  • History of Gestational Diabetes or delivery of a baby weighing > 9 lbs
  • History of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

 

ii.      Exclusion criteria - individuals not eligible to participate

  • Current diagnosis of pregnancy
  • Active alcohol or substance abuse by provider judgment that would affect successful participation
  • End Stage Renal Disease on dialysis
  • Current diagnosis of cancer undergoing treatment that prohibits participation – provider judgment
  • Any other significant or unusual condition or life situation that makes it likely that the participant will not be able to participate
  • Prior CVD is not an exclusion unless the individual currently has unstable CVD by provider judgment

 

b.     Recruitment

i.      Settings for recruitment can include community and clinical settings.

ii.      Methods of recruiting individuals to participate could include, but are not limited to, community activities and events, advertisements in local media sources and clinic/health/wellness facilities, targeted mailings from existing records, targeted home visits by CHRs, identification and referral by clinical staff, family events.

iii.     Recruitment goal - 50 participants per year

c. Retention

i.      Retention activities to promote continued participation such as group events and field  trips, newsletters tracking progress, incentives, competitions, raffles, healthy food at activities, role model success stories, recognition of achievements (graduation), items displaying program identification, motivational postcards, contracts, reminder mailings or phone calls, motivational speakers, buddy system, talking circles.

ii.      Identification and removal of barriers to participation such as child care, elder care, family involvement in activities, transportation and parking, flexible scheduling, employer approval for activities during working hours, extra sessions, evening sessions, community awareness of program.

iii.     Retention goal - 100% of your participants.

d.     Description of the Healthy Heart Project Activities

Award recipients will be required to implement all components of the activities described below and provide a work plan and time frame chart to that effect.

i.      Intensive Activities – Individuals with type 2 diabetes will undergo an intensive, clinical and case management approach to reducing their risk factors for CVD.  The key components include the following: 

  • Individual case management including assessment of participant needs, development and implementation of a care plan, monitoring and coordination of care with referrals and follow up, use of flow sheets, and care team meetings.  There will be monthly visits (risk reduction phase), then quarterly (risk management phase) per provider judgment.
  • Disease management utilizing the IHS Standards of Care, IHS Best Practices for CVD, and American Diabetes Association recommendations.  Key risk factors for CVD will be monitored through regular laboratory testing and treated to recommended targets at monthly clinic visits.  Strategies include smoking cessation in those who smoke, daily aspirin use, stress reduction/management, medication therapy, improved nutrition, increase in physical activity, and addressing mental health issues.  Treatment targets are blood pressure control (< 130/80 mmHg), lipid reduction (LDL < 100 mg/dl; HDL > 40 mg/dl in men and > 50 mg/dl in women; triglycerides < 150 mg/dl), glycemic control (A1C < 7.0), weight management/reduction (BMI < 30 or loss of at least 7% body weight; waist circumference < 40 inches in men and 35 inches in women).
  • Self-management education on diabetes and CVD risk reduction can occur in individual or group settings.  In addition to knowledge about diabetes and increased risk of CVD, other components of education could include motivational activities, involvement of families, lifestyle changes, assessment of readiness to change, and self-management blood glucose monitoring.  Some recommended resources are Balancing Your Life with Diabetes Curriculum, Honoring the Gift of Heart Health Curriculum, and National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education.

 

ii.      Less Intensive/Community awareness activities – Individuals identified with diabetes and those at risk for cardiovascular disease will participate in community-based awareness and motivational activities that help educate the community on ways to reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease.  Families can participate in activities such as monthly walks, health fairs, competitions, etc.  These activities provide an opportunity for the award recipient to tailor activities to community needs.

iii.     Documentation of outcomes and activities include an assessment and questionnaire at baseline and annually on the anniversary of the first case management visit.  Assessments include medical clearance for participation (should include physical exam and may include cardiac clearance for physical activity and ECG for high risk individuals), clinical measurements (weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure), lab tests (lipid profile, glycemic measurement, urine albumin: creatinine ratio), clinical history, and prescribed medications.  The questionnaires address health and health behaviors.

e.     Trainings, Meetings, and Conference Calls

Award recipients are required to attend all related trainings, meetings, and conference calls offered or recommended by DDTP and the SDPI Coordinating Center.  A minimum of four conference calls per year are anticipated.  Recipients should plan on four trips per year for trainings and meetings and budget accordingly.  Scheduled meetings will be held in Albuquerque, New Mexico or Denver, Colorado.

3.     Participation in Dissemination and Implementation Activities

The SDPI Demonstration Projects gained knowledge and experience that can be disseminated and communicated to help the Indian health care system learn how to successfully disseminate and implement these same activities into “real world” (non-SDPI Demonstration Project) IHS, Tribal, and Urban (I/T/U) settings.

 

  • Award recipients will help the Indian health system examine the process of translating interventions to other I/T/U “real world” settings.  These “real world” settings may have their own unique local characteristics and operate in a less controlled and supported environment.
  • Many factors affect whether I/T/U communities will use a given intervention.  Dissemination and implementation activities under this cooperative agreement will be designed to bridge the gap between the Demonstration Project settings and the “real world” setting of I/T/Us.

a.     Definitions

  • Dissemination is defined as the targeted distribution of information and intervention materials to the I/T/U audience.  The intent of dissemination is to increase awareness about the associated evidence-based interventions and to provide people with the necessary materials and tools to implement these interventions.
  • Implementation is defined as the use of strategies to adopt and integrate evidence-based health interventions and to change practice patterns within I/T/U settings.

 

b.     Goals

i.      The SDPI Diabetes Prevention and Healthy Heart staff, in collaboration with IHS DDTP and the Coordinating Center, will work together to develop models of dissemination and implementation that may be applicable across diverse I/T/U community and practice settings, and

ii.      The SDPI Diabetes Prevention and Healthy Heart staff, in collaboration with IHS DDTP and the Coordinating Center will design an evaluation that will accurately assess the outcomes of these efforts.

c.     Collaboration and Sharing Lessons Learned

i.      Award Recipients will work collaboratively as a group through face-to-face meetings and web-ex conference calls.

ii.      Through a series of discussions (both face-to-face and virtual) set up by the Coordinating Center, award recipients will share their lessons learned from their past years’ experiences (September 2004 through September 2010) in order to:

  • Explore ways to effectively disseminate the information about the Diabetes Prevention and Healthy Heart interventions.
  • Explore ways to develop a knowledge base about how interventions are effectively transported to or implemented in real world practice settings in AI/AN communities.

 

d.     Timeline

i.      Year one (planning year) for these activities will focus on:         

        - how best to package and transmit information about interventions to important stakeholder groups in I/T/U communities,

        - explore how this information is interpreted by these stakeholder groups.

ii.      Year two will involve developing and testing models of dissemination and implementation and designing an evaluation to assess outcomes.

e.     Budget

Award recipients are expected to attend all trainings, meetings, conference calls and web-ex trainings offered or recommended by the IHS DDTP and the SDPI Coordinating Center and should budget accordingly.

 

f.      Topics to be explored

Listed below are examples of topics that will be explored with DDTP and the Coordinating Center as part of these activities.  It is expected that participants will identify other important topic areas during the planning year.

  • Factors that influence the creation, dissemination and reception of proven interventions (such as the DP and/or HH program) in AI/AN communities.
  • Examine the capacity of specific delivery settings (primary care, schools, worksites, community health settings, etc.) for dissemination or implementation efforts in AI/AN communities.
  • Development of outcome measures and practical methods for dissemination and implementation approaches.
  • Testing the effectiveness of dissemination or implementation strategies to reduce health disparities and improve quality of care among the AI/AN population.
  • Examination of how successful screening promotion approaches are implemented in I/T/U settings.

 

g.     Instructions for Applicants

As part of this application, applicants are asked to answer the following questions, with narrative, in one page or less.  Applicants that are current SDPI grantees but not a Demonstration Project grantee, please answer based on your SDPI Community-Directed grant’s experience.

i.      What are the three (3) major challenges that your grant program encountered in the implementation of the Demonstration Project intervention (Diabetes Prevention or Healthy Heart) within your community?

ii.      What are the three (3) most important things you and your SDPI program have learned over the past 5 years that you think should be disseminated to other I/T/U programs?

iii.     In your opinion, what have been the most successful ways that the Coordinating Center and the IHS Division of Diabetes have used to deliver useful information to you, the grantee?

C.     Participant Privacy and Confidentiality

Applicants must document procedures in place that ensure compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations, as all Indian health programs are required to do.  Problems with privacy and confidentiality identified during peer review of the application may result in the delay of funding.

D.     Report of Results and Dissemination of Effort

Given the importance of the outcomes of these initiatives to future funding of the SDPI, particular emphasis will be placed on the timely and comprehensive reporting of results through a variety of mechanisms.  These mechanisms include, but are not limited to: internal DDTP/IHS reports, regular briefings of the TLDC, Congressional testimony and supporting documentation, presentations to appropriate advocacy groups, other potential funding agencies, other SDPI grantees, I/T/U diabetes programs and scientific presentations/publications.  Consistent with the government-to-government relationship between the Federal government and Tribes, all reports, presentations, and manuscripts for publications will be provided to the appropriate Tribal or local organizational authority for review and approval prior to dissemination.  However, by virtue of application under this announcement, and as a condition of award, grantees must agree to conduct said review within 30 days of notice of intent to disseminate.  Failure to respond will be treated as concurrence and dissemination will proceed as proposed.

E.     Compliance with Requirements

By acceptance of this award, applicants agree to work with the SDPI Coordinating Center and the IHS Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention, and to comply with all requirements for implementation of the programs and documentation of program activities and outcomes. 

III.    Eligibility Information

A.     Eligible Applicants

Current SDPI Demonstration Project grantees are eligible to apply for funding under this competitive cooperative agreement announcement and must demonstrate that they have complied with previous terms and conditions of the SDPI grant in order to receive funding. 

SDPI Community-Directed grantees that meet the following criteria and can document capacity are also eligible.

1.     Indian Health Service facility (hospital or clinic).

2.     Federally-recognized Tribes operating an Indian health program operated pursuant to a contract, grant, cooperative agreement, or compact with the IHS pursuant to the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (ISDEAA), (Pub. L. 93-638).

3.     Title V Urban Indian Health Program: this includes programs currently under a grant or contract with the IHS under Title V of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act, (Pub. Law 93-437).

4.     A Consortium of any of the above that can demonstrate a history of successful collaborative efforts in meeting goals and requirements of previous projects or grant programs.  Smaller applicants are encouraged to apply as a consortium, especially if their diabetes registry is < 250.

Eligible entities may apply for one or both programs as the primary award recipient, but will only be funded for one (Diabetes Prevention Program or Healthy Heart Project) cooperative agreement.  Furthermore, eligible entities may participate in only one consortium for the program area (Diabetes Prevention Program or Healthy Heart Project) in which they are not a primary award recipient. 

Entities that are not currently funded for either a SDPI Community-Directed or Demonstration Project grant are not eligible.

Non-profit Tribal organizations or national/area health boards are not eligible to apply, consistent with Tribal consultation on this issue.  These organizations may be funded by eligible entities to assist with the program through collaborative arrangements.

Applications that do not meet these eligibility requirements will be returned to the applicant without further review. 

B.     Applicants Must Demonstrate:

1.     Minimum burden of diabetes in population served – (describe in Project Narrative, under “Statement of Need”).  Applicants must submit information to show that the burden of diabetes in their community is significant and justifies funding for this program, such as the user population of their health program, the number of individuals in their diabetes registry, and any other descriptive data quantifying the problem of diabetes in the population served.  In general, successful applicants will have at least a user population of 2500 and/or a diabetes registry of at least 250 individuals.  Eligible entities that have a diabetes registry of less than 250 people are encouraged to form a consortium with other eligible entities.  In general, the minimum size of a consortium should be a total combined user population of ~ 2500 and/or a total combined diabetes registry ~ 250.

2.     Prior success in diabetes prevention and treatment activities – (describe in Project Narrative, under “Resources and Experience”).  Applicants must demonstrate prior successful activities to prevent or treat diabetes, including a description of the activities, any evaluation or outcomes so far, and evidence of successful compliance with SDPI requirements.

3.     Basic health infrastructure to participate in project – (describe in Project Narrative, under “Organization and Community Readiness and Feasibility”).  The applicant must demonstrate that the following basic health infrastructure is in place or provide a plan for putting it into place with this funding mechanism:

a.     Clinical services - such as a health clinic or center

b.     Laboratory - available for testing associated with the program

c.     Administrative and financial staff to manage and monitor the program

d.     Health professionals - on site health educator/diabetes educator, dietitian, physical activity specialist, full-time clerk/recruiter for this project, and physician consultant

e.     Pharmacist - available for project

f.      Data Coordinator - at least one person on site to manage documentation of program activities and outcomes and report data to Coordinating Center

g.     Resource and Patient Management System (RPMS) site manager to use the Diabetes Management System (DMS), lab, and Pharmacy packages.  If you are not using RPMS, please describe your current health data system and its compatibility or comparability to RPMS.

4.     Additional staff recommended for each program: (documentation will be placed in the Appendices section under ”Resumes or Position Descriptions of Key Staff”)

a.     Diabetes Prevention Program - diabetes educator and/or other licensed health professional    to teach curriculum; lifestyle coach

b.     Healthy Heart Project - case manager(s) who is licensed healthcare professional

C.     Cost Sharing or Matching

The proposed application may include additional affiliated organizations to implement the activities of the program.  These organizations may include colleges or universities, additional Tribes, or other Indian organizations/health boards.  Applicants must include letters from these affiliated organizations indicating their agreement to participate in this project.  The applicant must include information on any cost sharing and/or funding for subcontracts to these organizations in the budget and budget narrative.

D.     Other Requirements

1.     Key Personnel

a.     Program Director - This individual will be responsible for the administration (including fiscal management) of the overall project, must have his/her primary appointment with the applicant organization.  Special arrangements of employment, such as inter-organizational personnel agreements, are permissible.  The Program Director may be, but is not required to be, the Program Coordinator.

b.     Program Coordinator - This individual is responsible for the day-to-day leadership and management of the activities within the project.  The Program Coordinator must meet the following requirements: 

i.      Have relevant health care education and/or experience.

ii.      Have experience with program management and grant and/or cooperative agreement management, including skills in program coordination, budgeting, reporting and supervision of staff.

iii.     Have a working knowledge of diabetes.

2.     Documentation of Support

a.     Tribal Organizations - Applicants must submit a current, signed and dated Tribal resolution or Tribal letter of support from all Indian Tribe(s) to be affected by the proposed program activities.

b.     Title V Urban Indian Health Programs - Urban Indian health programs must submit a letter of support from the organization’s board of directors.  Urban Indian health programs are non-profit organizations and must also submit a copy of the 501(c)(3) Certificate.

c.     IHS Hospitals or Clinics - IHS facilities must submit a letter of support from the Chief Executive Officer (CEO).

d.     Other Partners and Collaborating Entities - The applicants must submit a letter of support from the top administrator of all partners and collaborating entities.

IV.    Application and Submission Information

A.     Obtaining Application package and instructions

Application package and instruction may be found at www.Grants.gov .  Applicants may also download a copy of the application and instructions package at the IHS Division of Diabetes SDPI Diabetes Prevention Program and Healthy Heart Project website at www.diabetes.ihs.gov.

B.     Content and Form Application Submission

1.     Mandatory documents for all applicants include:

a.     Application forms

i.      SF-424

ii.      SF-424A

iii.     SF-424B

iv.     Key Contacts Form

b.     Budget Narrative.

c.     Project Narrative.

d.     Tribal Resolution or Tribal Letter of Support (Tribal Organizations only).

e.     Letter of Support from Organization’s Board of Director (Title V Urban Indian Health Programs only).        

f.      501(c)(3) Certificate (Title V Urban Indian Health Programs only).

g.     CEO Letters of Support (IHS facilities only).

h.     Biographical sketches for all Key Personnel.

i.      Disclosure of Lobbying Activities (SF-LLL) (if applicable).

j.      Documentation of OMB A-133 required Financial Audit for FY 2007 and FY 2008.  Acceptable forms of documentation include:

-       E-mail confirmation from Federal Audit Clearinghouse (FAC) that audits were submitted; or

-       Face sheets from fiscal audit reports. These can be found on the FAC website: http://harvester.census.gov/fac/dissem/accessoptions.html?submit=Retreive+Records .

k.     Appendices.

2.     Public Policy Requirements

All Federal-wide public policies apply to IHS grants with the exception of the Discrimination Policy.

3.     Requirements for Project Narrative and Budget Narratives

The application must contain the following:

a.     Table of Contents

b.     Abstract (one page) summarizing the program.

c.     Project Narrative - no more than seven (7) pages - organized in the following manner:

i.      APPLICANT STATUS

  • State the program for which you are applying.  Is it primary prevention of diabetes or cardiovascular disease risk reduction?  Remember: applicants can apply for only one program per application.  Clearly identify yourself or your consortium as the applicant and indicate the basis for its eligibility under this initiative as described above in III – Eligibility Information.

 

ii.      STATEMENT OF NEED

  • Define the target populations that will participate in the program and the geographic area to be served.  Clearly state the unduplicated number of individuals you propose to serve (annually and over the entire program period).  Applicants should propose to serve no fewer than 48 new individuals with pre-diabetes per year for the primary prevention of diabetes project, or 50 new individuals per year for the cardiovascular disease risk reduction project.
  • Describe the burden of diabetes, the nature of the problem and extent of the need for the program in the target population(s).  Documentation of need may come from quantitative as well as qualitative sources.  The quantitative data could come from community assessments you or others have conducted, or from local data or trend analyses, diabetes registry numbers and/or IHS Diabetes Care and Outcomes Audit data.  Qualitative sources could include focus groups and key informant interviews you or others have conducted with the targeted community, as well as anecdotal reports.
  • See III. Eligibility Information, B.1.  Applicants must demonstrate “the minimum burden of diabetes in population served.”

             

iii.     ORGANIZATIONAL AND COMMUNITY READINESS AND FEASIBILITY

  • Discuss the capability and experience of the applicant organization and other participating organizations, including experience organizing and mobilizing the community, and providing relevant diabetes services, as well as culturally appropriate/competent services.
  • Describe the extent to which the community and other stakeholders indicate support for your proposed program.  Identify categories of stakeholders – for example, professional groups, civic groups, governmental organizations, faith-based groups, and others – and discuss the role you expect them to play in the program.  Applicants are encouraged to include letters of support showing stakeholders interested with this application.
  • See III. Eligibility Information, B.3.  Applicants must demonstrate that the basic health infrastructure listed is in place or provide a plan for putting it into place with this funding mechanism.

 

iv.     PROGRAM APPROACH

  • Discuss and explain the core values that will guide the implementation of program activities, and explain how each of these values will be operationalized.  At a minimum, discuss each of the following as it relates to the proposed program:  a) healthy lifestyles; b) participatory process; c) authentic community voice; d) leadership development; and, e) cultural context for engaging and involving individuals and community.  You may identify and discuss other values important to your targeted individuals and community.
  • Discuss how you plan to develop effective partnerships with community organizations and other groups, so as to minimize duplication of services and perceived threats of encroachment on established “territory.”
  • Describe the potential barriers to successful conduct of the proposed program and how you will overcome them.

 

v.      RESOURCES AND EXPERIENCE

  • Applicants must demonstrate prior successful activities to prevent or treat diabetes, including a description of the activities, any evaluation or outcomes so far, and evidence of successful compliance with SDPI requirements.  See III. Eligibility Information, B.2.  Applicants must demonstrate “prior success in diabetes prevention and treatment activities.”
  • Show that the necessary groundwork (e.g., planning, consensus development, memoranda of agreement, identification of potential facilities) has been completed or is near completion so that the program can be implemented as soon as possible.  If applicable, identify any cash or in-kind contribution that you or your partnering organizations will make to the program.
  • Describe the resources available for the proposed program (e.g., facilities, equipment, qualified staff), and provide evidence that services will be provided in a location that is adequate, accessible, compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and amenable to the target population.

 

vi.     CAPACITY BUILDING

  • Indicate the gaps that the program activities supported by this cooperative agreement will fill or the manner in which they will extend/expand other existing services in your community.
  • Describe strategies for sustaining the program activities beyond the project period if Congress does not continue funding for this initiative after 2012.

 

vii.    DOCUMENTATION OF OUTCOMES AND ACTIVITIES

  • Describe your ability to collect, document, manage, and report on required measures as outlined previously (for Diabetes Prevention refer to –I.B.1.d. – Description of Diabetes Prevention Program Activities, iv. – Documentation of outcomes and activities) (for Healthy Heart Project refer to –I.B.2.d. – Description of Healthy Heart Project Activities, iii. – Documentation of outcomes and activities).  The IHS DDTP will provide the necessary protocols and forms for documentation and reporting.  Describe current use of RPMS, and whether you are using the RPMS packages such as pharmacy, laboratory and Diabetes Management System (DMS).  If you are not using RPMS, please describe your current health data system and its compatibility or comparability to RPMS.
  • In general terms, describe any experience in documenting similar information, quality control, and transfer to external programs such as the IHS/DDTP.
  • Describe the local process for reviewing and approving all reports and publications based on data such as these.

 

d.     Budget Narrative

The budget narrative – no more than 4 pages - should explain why each budget item on the SF-424A is necessary and relevant to the proposed project.

e.     Appendices:

1.     Work plan and a one-page time frame chart for required activities.

2.     Documentation of procedures in place that ensure compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations.

3.     Resumes or position descriptions of key staff.

4.     Contractor/consultant resumes or qualifications and scope of work.

5.     Current indirect cost agreement.

6.     Organizational chart (optional).

7.     Required Organization Financial Audits for 2007 and 2008.

4.     The Project and Budget Narratives must:

a.     Be single spaced.

b.     Be typewritten.

c.     Have consecutively numbered pages.

d.     Use black type not smaller than 12 characters per one inch.

e.     Be printed on one side only of standard size 8-1/2” x 11” paper.

5.     Page Limit

The seven (7) page limit for the project narrative does not include the work plan, time frame chart, standard forms, Tribal resolutions or letters of support, table of contents, budget, budget narrative, and/or other appendix items.

C.     Submission Dates and Times

Applicants will have 30 days to complete the application process.  Applications must be submitted electronically through Grants.gov by no later than 12:00 midnight Eastern Daylight Time (EST) on September 10, 2010.  Any application received after the application deadline will not be accepted for processing, and it will be returned to the applicant(s) without further consideration for funding.

If technical challenges arise and assistance is required with the electronic application process, contact Grants.gov Customer Support via e-mail to support@grants.gov or at (800) 518-4726.  Customer Support is available to address questions 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (except on Federal holidays).  If problems persist, contact Tammy Bagley, IHS Division of Grants Management (DGM) (tammy.bagley@ihs.gov) at (301) 443-5204 to describe the difficulties being experienced.  Be sure to contact Ms. Bagley at least ten days prior to the application deadline.  Please do not contact the DGM until you have received a Grants.gov tracking number.  In the event you are not able to obtain a tracking number, call the DGM as soon as possible.

If an applicant needs to submit a paper application instead of submitting electronically via Grants.gov, prior approval must be requested and obtained.  The waiver must be documented in writing (e-mails are acceptable), before submitting a paper application.  After a waiver is received, the application package must be downloaded by the applicant from Grants.gov.  Once completed and printed, the original application and one (1) copy must be sent to Denise E. Clark, Division of Grants Management (DGM) (denise.clark@ihs.gov), 801 Thompson Avenue, TMP Suite 360, Rockville, MD 20852.  Paper applications that are submitted without a waiver will be returned to the applicant without review or further consideration.

D.     Intergovernmental Review

Executive Order 12372 requiring intergovernmental review is not applicable to this program.

 

E.     Funding Restrictions

1.     Each Cooperative Agreement shall not exceed the amounts stated:

  • SDPI Diabetes Prevention and Healthy Heart grantees who are currently receiving $324,300 should budget for the same amount.
  • SDPI Diabetes Prevention and Healthy Heart grantees who are currently receiving $397,000 should budget for the same amount.
  • SDPI Community-Directed grantees who are applying for the Diabetes Prevention and Healthy Heart program funding should apply for a $324,300 base amount.

 

2.     The available funds are inclusive of direct and appropriate indirect costs.

3.     Only one Cooperative Agreement will be awarded per primary applicant.

4.     Pre-award costs are not allowable without prior approval from the awarding agency. In accordance with 45 C.F.R. Part 74 and 92, all pre-award costs are incurred at the recipient’s risk.  The awarding office is under no obligation to reimburse such costs if for any reason the applicant does not receive an award or if the award is less than anticipated.

 

F.     Electronic Submission Requirements

Use the http://www.Grants.gov website to submit an application electronically; select the “Find Grant Opportunity” link on the home page, then click basic search and enter the CFDA number.  Download a copy of the application package, complete it offline and then upload and submit the application via the Grants.gov website.  Electronic copies of the application may not be submitted as attachments to email messages addressed to IHS employees or offices.

Applicants that receive a waiver to submit paper application documents must follow the rules and timelines that are noted below.  The applicant must seek assistance at least ten days prior to the application deadline.

Applicants that do not adhere to the timelines for Central Contractor Registry (CCR) and/or Grant.gov registration and/or request timely assistance with technical issues will not be considered for a waiver to submit a paper application.  

Please Be Aware of the Following:

  • Paper applications are not the preferred method for submitting applications.  Applicants are required to submit applications electronically via Grants.gov.  Paper applications are only accepted with an approved waiver.
  • If you have problems submitting your application on-line, contact Grants.gov Customer Support via email at support@grants.gov or at (800) 518-4726.  Customer Support is available to address questions 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (except on Federal holidays).  If problems persist, contact Tammy Bagley, IHS Division of Grants Management, at (301) 443-5204.
  • Upon contacting Grants.gov obtain a tracking number as proof of contact.  The tracking number is helpful if there are technical issues that cannot be resolved and a waiver to submit a paper application must be obtained.  
  • If it is determined that a waiver is needed, the applicant must submit a request in writing (e-mails are acceptable) to GrantsPolicy@ihs.gov with a copy to Tammy.Bagley@ihs.gov.  Include a clear justification for the need to deviate from our standard electronic submission process.
  • If the waiver is approved, the application package must be downloaded by the applicant from Grants.gov.  Once completed and printed, it should be sent directly to the IHS Division of Grants Management by the deadline date, September 10, 2010.  Anticipate priority mail timelines.
  • Upon entering the Grants.gov website, there is information that outlines the requirements to the applicant regarding electronic submission of an application through Grants.gov, as well as the hours of operations.
  • Applicants are strongly encouraged not to wait until the deadline date to begin the application process through Grants.gov as the registration process for CCR and Grants.gov could take up to fifteen (15) working days.
  • In order to use Grants.gov, the applicant must have a Dun and Bradstreet (D&B) Number and register in the Central Contractor Registration (CCR).  A minimum of ten (10) working days should be allowed to complete CCR registration.
  • All documents must be submitted electronically, including all information typically included on the SF 424 and all necessary assurances and certifications.
  • Please use the optional attachment feature in Grants.gov to attach additional documentation that may be requested by IHS.
  • Your application must comply with any page limitation requirements described in the program announcement.
  • After you electronically submit your application, you will receive an automatic acknowledgment from Grants.gov that contains a Grants.gov tracking number.  The IHS DGM will download your application from Grants.gov and provide necessary copies to the DDTP.  Neither the DGM nor the DDTP will notify applicants that the application has been received.
  • You may search for the application package in Grants.gov (http://www.Grants.gov) by entering the CFDA number or the Funding Opportunity Number.  Both numbers are located on the title page of this announcement.
  • The applicant must provide the Funding Opportunity Number: HHS-2010-IHS-SDPI-0005.

 

D&B Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS)

Applicants are required to have a DUNS number to apply for a grant or cooperative agreement from the Federal Government.  The DUNS number is a unique nine-digit identification number provided by D&B, which uniquely identifies your entity.  Many organizations may already have a DUNS number.  The DUNS number is site specific; therefore each distinct performance site may be assigned a DUNS number.  Obtaining a DUNS number is easy and there is no charge.  To obtain a DUNS number or to find out if your organization already has a DUNS number, access the website, http://fedgov.dnb.com/webform or to expedite the process call (866) 705-5711.

             

Applicants must also be registered with the CCR.  A DUNS number is required before an applicant can complete their CCR registration.  Registration with the CCR is free of charge.  Applicants may register online at www.ccr.gov or by calling (866) 606-8220.  Additional information regarding the DUNS, CCR, and Grants.gov processes can be found at: www.Grants.gov.

 

V.     Application Review Information

 

A.     Review Criteria

The following review criteria will be used to evaluate the application:

STATEMENT OF NEED (10 points)

Has the applicant adequately demonstrated the burden of diabetes, the current lack of adequate services, and sufficient target population size?

ORGANIZATIONAL AND COMMUNITY READINESS AND FEASIBILITY (10 points)

Has applicant demonstrated the management and administrative experience, and stakeholder support necessary to implement the program?

PROGRAM APPROACH (10 points)

Has the applicant demonstrated appropriate core values and described feasible strategies to overcome obstacles to success and obtain acceptance within the communities served?

RESOURCES AND EXPERIENCE (25 points)

Does the applicant have at its disposal qualified staff, facilities, and equipment necessary to implement the program in a culturally appropriate manner and in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act?

CAPACITY BUILDING (10 points)

Has the applicant described how the program will build upon existing services in the community without duplication of services and proposed a feasible plan for sustainability?

DOCUMENTATION OF OUTCOMES AND ACTIVITIES (10 points)

Has the applicant demonstrated the ability to collect, document, manage, and report the required measures and other information described in this announcement with the necessary attention to detail and quality control?

WORK PLAN AND TIME FRAME CHART (25 points)

Has the applicant demonstrated an understanding of the goals and objectives of the program and the required activities?

Note:  Although the budget for the proposed project is not a review criterion, the reviewers will be asked to comment on the appropriateness of the budget after the merits of the application have been considered.

B.     Review and Selection Process

In addition to the criteria in V.1., applications are considered according to the following:

1.     Application Submission

All applications must meet these minimum requirements:

a.     The applicant and proposed program type is eligible in accordance with this cooperative agreement announcement.

b.     The application narrative, forms, and materials submitted meet the requirements of the announcement, allowing the review panel to undertake an in-depth evaluation.

 2.    Competitive Review of Eligible Applications

Applications will undergo an initial pre-screening by the DGM.  The pre-screening will assess whether applications that meet the eligibility requirements are complete, responsive, and conform to criteria outlined in this program announcement.  The applications that meet the minimum criteria will be reviewed by the Objective Review Committee (ORC).

The ORC is composed of Tribal, Federal and non-Federal reviewers, appointed by the IHS, to review each application for merit based on the evaluation criteria.  The review will be conducted in accordance with the HHS/IHS Objective Review Guidelines as required by HHS Grants Policy.  The technical review process ensures selection of quality programs in a national competition for limited funding.

Applications will be evaluated and rated on the basis of the evaluation criteria listed in V.A.  The ORC reviewers will use the criteria outlined in this announcement to evaluate the quality of a proposed program, determine the likelihood of success, and assign a numerical score to each application.  A Summary Statement that identifies the strengths and weaknesses of the application will be completed for each application.

The scoring of approved applications will assist the IHS in determining which proposals will be funded.  Applications scored by the ORC at 60 points and above will be recommended for approval and forwarded to the DGM.  The program official will forward the approval list to the IHS Director for final review and approval.  Applications scoring below 60 points will be disapproved.

All applicants will receive a copy of their respective Summary Statement.  Applicants who are disapproved based on their Objective Review score will receive a copy of their Summary Statement sooner in order to allow time to complete revisions.

3.     Application Revisions

If an application does not receive a minimum score for funding from the ORC, the applicant will be informed via a summary statement that will be sent to the Authorized Organization Representative (AOR) via e-mail.  The applicant then has one additional opportunity to submit a revised application.  Before application revisions can be submitted, the AOR must have received a summary statement from the previous review that outlines the weaknesses of the initial application. 

 

a.     Revision to Initial Application

        Applicants will have ten (10) business days from the date that the summary statement is sent via e-mail to submit hard copies of their application revisions.  Along with the revised application documents, applicants must prepare and submit an Introduction letter of not more than three pages that summarizes the substantial additions, deletions, and changes.  The Introduction must also include responses to the weaknesses and potential issues raised in the summary statement.

  • Technical assistance will be available to applicants as they prepare resubmission documentation.
  • Application re-review date to be determined.  Technical assistance is available to all applicants that do not receive fundable scores.  These applicants are encouraged to contact the ADC for their area or the SDPI Coordinating Center to obtain assistance.

- Contact information for ADCs can be found on the Division of Diabetes website http://www.diabetes.ihs.gov/index.cfm?module=peopleADCDirectory.

- Contact information for the SDPI Coordinating Center is:

        Megan R. Berrier, BA, Program Specialist

        SDPI DP Program and HH Project Coordinating Center

        Phone: 303-724-0426; Fax: 303-724-0332

        Email:  Meghan.Berrier@ucdenver.edu

d.     An Ad Hoc Review Committee will be convened specifically to review the revised application.  If the revised application receives the minimum score for funding or above, the applicant will be informed via a Notice of Award (NoA).  If the Review Committee determines that the application with revisions still does not receive a fundable score, the applicant will be informed of their application’s deficiencies via a second summary statement that will be e-mailed to the AOR.  There will be no further opportunity for resubmission.

4.     Anticipated Announcement and Award Dates

Grantees that receive a fundable score will be notified of their approval for funding via the NoA.

VI.    Award Administration Information

 

A.     Award Notices

The NoA is a legally binding document, signed by the Grants Management Officer, and serves as the official notification of the award.  The NoA is the authorizing document for which funds are dispersed to the approved entities and reflects the amount of Federal funds awarded, the purpose of the award, the terms and conditions of the award, the effective date of the award, and the budget/project period.

The NoA will be prepared by the Division of Grants Management (DGM) and sent via postal mail to each applicant that is approved for funding under this announcement.  This document will be sent to the person who is listed on the SF-424 as the AOR.  The AOR serves as the business point of contact for all business aspects of the award.  Any correspondence other than the NoA announcing to the Project Director that an application was selected is not an authorization to begin performance.

B.     Administrative Requirements

Cooperative Agreements are administered in accordance with the following documents:

1.     The criteria as outlined this Program Announcement.

2.     Program and Administrative Regulations:

a.     45 C.F.R. Part 74 – Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State, Local and Tribal Governments.

b.     45 C.F.R., Part 92, Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State, Local and Tribal Governments.

c.     Program Regulations, 42 C.F.R. Part 136.101 et seq.

3.     Grants Policy

a.     HHS Grants Policy Statement, January 2007.

4.     Cost Principles

a.     OMB Circular A-87 - State, Local, and Indian Tribal Governments (Title 2, Part 225).

b.     OMB Circular A-122 – Non-profit Organizations (Title 2, Part 230).

5.     Audit Requirements

a.     OMB Circular A-133 - Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-profit Organizations.

C.     Indirect Costs

This section applies to all recipients that request reimbursement of indirect costs in their application.  In accordance with the HHS Grants Policy Statement, Part II - 27, IHS requires applicants to have a current indirect cost rate agreement in place prior to award.  The rate agreement must be prepared in accordance with the applicable cost principles and guidance as provided by the cognizant agency or office.  A current rate covers the applicable grant activities under the current award’s budget period.  If the current rate is not on file with the DGM at the time of award, the indirect cost portion of the budget will be restricted.  The restrictions remain in place until the current rate is provided to the DGM.

Generally, indirect costs rates for IHS award recipients are negotiated with the HHS Division of Cost Allocation (http://rates.psc.gov/) and the Department of the Interior National Business Center (1849 C St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20240) (http://www.aqd.nbc.gov/indirect/indirect.asp).  If your organization has questions regarding the indirect cost policy, please contact the DGM at (301) 443 5204.

D.     Reporting Requirements

The DDTP and the DGM have requirements for progress reports and financial reports based on the terms and conditions of this cooperative agreement as noted below:

Award recipients must submit the reports consistent with the applicable deadlines.  Failure to submit required reports within the time allowed may result in suspension or termination of an active cooperative agreement, withholding of additional awards for the program, or other enforcement actions such as withholding of payments or converting to the reimbursement method of payment.  Continued failure to submit required reports may result in one or both of the following:  (1) the imposition of special award provisions; and (2) the non-funding or non-award of other eligible programs or activities.  This applies whether the delinquency is attributable to the failure of the recipient organization or the individual responsible for preparation of the reports.

1.     Progress Report

Program progress reports are required to be submitted semi-annually, within 30 days after the mid-point of the budget period.  The progress report will include a brief comparison of actual accomplishments to the goals established for the period, or, if applicable, provide sound justification for the lack of progress, and other pertinent information as required.  A final report must be submitted within 90 days of expiration of the budget/project period.

2.     Financial Status Report

Annual financial status reports are not required until the end of the project period. Reports must be submitted annually within 30 days after the end of each specified reporting period.  The final financial status report is due within 90 days after the end of the 24 month project period.  Standard Form (SF) 269 (long form for those reporting program income; short form for all others) will be used for financial reporting.

Grantees are responsible and accountable for accurate reporting of the Progress Reports and Financial Status Reports (FSR).  According to SF-269 instructions, the final SF-269 must be verified from the grantee records to support the information outlined in the FSR.

3.    Federal Cash Transaction Reports

Federal Cash Transaction Reports are due every calendar quarter to the Division of Payment Management (DPM), Payment Management Branch.  Please refer to the DPM website (http://www.dpm.psc.gov/) for additional guidance.  Failure to submit timely reports may cause a disruption in timely payments to your organization.

4.     FY 2007 and FY 2008 Single Audit Reports (OMB A-133)

Applicants who have an active SDPI grant are required to be up-to-date in the submission of required financial (fiscal) audit reports.  These are the annual financial audit reports (required by OMB A-133, audits of state, local governments, and non-profit organizations) that are submitted.  Documentation of (or proof of submission) of current FY 2007 and FY 2008 Financial Audit Reports is mandatory.  Acceptable forms of documentation include: email confirmation from the Federal Audit Clearinghouse (FAC) that financial audits were submitted; or copies of face sheets from audit reports.  Face sheets can be found on the FAC website: http://harvester.census.gov/fac/dissem/accessoptions.html?submit=Retreive+Records.

Telecommunication for the hearing impaired is available at: TTY (301) 443 6394.

VII.   IHS Agency Contact(s)

 

Questions on the programmatic issues may be directed to:

Gordon Quam, RN, Program Project Officer

IHS Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention

Telephone:  505-248-4182

Fax:  505-248-4188

Email:  gordon.quam@ihs.gov

               

Questions on grants management and fiscal matters may be directed to:

Denise Clark, Grants Management Officer
IHS Division of Grants Management
Telephone:  (301) 443-5204
Fax:  (301) 443-9602
E-mail:  denise.clark@ihs.gov


The Public Health Service (PHS) strongly encourages all cooperative agreement and contract recipients to provide a smoke-free workplace and promote the non-use of all tobacco products.  In addition, Pub. L. 103-227, the Pro-Children Act of 1994, prohibits smoking in certain facilities (or in some cases, any portion of the facility) in which regular or routine education, library, day care, health care or early childhood development services are provided to children.  This is consistent with the PHS mission to protect and advance the physical and mental health of the American people.

___________________                                 ________________________________________

Date                                                               Yvette Roubideaux, M.D., M.P.H.

                                                                      Director, Indian Health Service

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