U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Indian Health Service: The Federal Health Program for American Indians and Alaska Natives
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Thursday, July 31, 2014

Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention - Leading the effort to treat and prevent diabetes in American Indians and Alaska Natives


Standards of Care and Clinical Practice
Recommendations: Type 2 Diabetes

Last updated: July 2012

Sexual Health

Clinical Practice Recommendations

Sexual Health

recommendations icon Recommendations for Sexual Health

  • Ask both men and women about sexual health concerns, review therapeutic options, and provide referrals as needed.

Changes in sexual function are common health problems as people age. Having diabetes can mean early onset and increased severity of these problems. Sexual dysfunction for people with diabetes can be due to autonomic neuropathy, cardiovascular disease, hormone deficiencies, side effects of medications, smoking, alcohol abuse, and psychological concerns such as depression, stress, and anxiety, or a combination of these. Many patients will welcome the opportunity to address these important quality of life issues during diabetes care visits.

Common sexual problems in men with diabetes include:

  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Low testosterone
  • Retrograde ejaculation

Common sexual problems in women with diabetes include:

  • Decreased vaginal lubrication during stimulation
  • Decreased or no sexual desire
  • Decreased or absent sexual response
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Resources

Tools for Clinicians and Educators

tools and resources icon Key Tools and Resources

Erectile Dysfunction Guideline Update Panel. Exit Disclaimer: You Are Leaving www.ihs.gov The Management of Erectile Dysfunction: An Update. American Urological Association. 2005 with update in 2006, validity confirmed in 2009.

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. National Institutes of Health. Sexual and Urologic Problems of Diabetes. Exit Disclaimer: You Are Leaving www.ihs.gov NIH Publication No. 09–5135. 2011.

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Bibliography

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). Female sexual dysfunction. Exit Disclaimer: You Are Leaving www.ihs.gov Washington (DC): American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 119; 2011 April. 12 p.

Dhindsa F, Miller MG, McWhirter CL, Mager DE, Ghanim H, Chaudhuri A, et al. Testosterone concentrations in diabetic and nondiabetic obese men. Exit Disclaimer: You Are Leaving www.ihs.gov Diabetes Care. 2010;33(6), 1186-92.

Erectile Dysfunction Guideline Update Panel. The Management of Erectile Dysfunction: An Update. American Urological Association. Exit Disclaimer: You Are Leaving www.ihs.gov 2005 with update in 2006, validity confirmed in 2009.

Lindau ST, Schumm LP, Laumann EO, Levinson W, O’Muircheartaigh CA, Waite LJ. A study of sexuality and health among older adults in the United States. Exit Disclaimer: You Are Leaving www.ihs.gov [PDF]  N Engl J Med. 2007 Aug 23;357(8): 762-74.

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. National Institutes of Health. Sexual and Urologic Problems of Diabetes. Exit Disclaimer: You Are Leaving www.ihs.gov NIH Publication No. 09–5135. 2011.

Wang C, Jackson G, Jones TH, Matsumoto AM, Nehra A, Perelman MA, et al. Low testosterone associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome contributes to sexual dysfunction and cardiovascular disease risk in men with type 2 diabetes. Exit Disclaimer: You Are Leaving www.ihs.gov Diabetes Care. 2011 Jul;34:1669-73.

Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention | Phone: (505) 248-4182 | Fax: (505) 248-4188 | diabetesprogram@ihs.gov