U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Indian Health Service: The Federal Health Program for American Indians and Alaska Natives
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Saturday, December 20, 2014

Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention - Leading the effort to treat and prevent diabetes in American Indians and Alaska Natives


Creating Strong Diabetes Programs: Plan a Trip to Success!

Essential Elements icon
Essential Elements for Step 1: Get Started – Why Plan?

First steps in planning are to determine who needs to be involved in program planning and when to get started. Using the tools in the Workbook will help your diabetes team get started. Program planning is a dynamic process and you will need to revisit your plan often.

Who needs to do program planning? down arrow up arrow

  • All those who conduct health programs
    • Nurses
    • Doctors
    • Health Educators
    • Dietitians
    • Health Program Specialists
    • Community Health Representatives
    • Support Staff and Others
  • All those who make policy for health programs
    • Health Department Administrator
    • Program Managers
    • Health Directors
    • Others

When should you get started? down arrow up arrow

  • Program planning and evaluation begin when the program is just an idea.

How do you get started? down arrow up arrow

  • Start by knowing the history, resources, constraints and expectations of the program.
  • Find existing plans or pieces of program plans and evaluation.
  • Use the Tool Tips and Checklist to determine what is available to your program.
  • Use the Visual Planning Tool (or Road Map) to help you keep track of information and understand how your program will work.

How does the Visual Planning Tool (Road Map) help a diabetes program? down arrow up arrow

  • Identify what resources (inputs) are available and those still needed.
  • Choose activities (things the program does) based on assessed needs.
  • Identify products (who was served or what was developed).
  • Document results or outcomes, both short-term (awareness, knowledge skills) and intermediate (behavior, practice, decisions, policy).
  • Document impact or long-term results (social, economic, environmental).

 

Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention | Phone: (505) 248-4182 | Fax: (505) 248-4188 | diabetesprogram@ihs.gov