U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Indian Health Service: The Federal Health Program for American Indians and Alaska Natives
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Saturday, November 22, 2014

Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention - Leading the effort to treat and prevent diabetes in American Indians and Alaska Natives


Making Your Meetings Work

Part 7 of Making Your Meetings Work web-based training. To access this training, please download Flash Player.


Video: Role Playing Example (1:10)

Essential Elements

Role play is used to best illustrate how to work with other people, such as our colleagues in the office or a patient in a clinic setting. However, role play also creates heavy resistance from the participants, which needs to be addressed.

Role play is part of the learning process that teaches you to actively pay attention, listen, react in real time and receive feedback. Also, role play with your peers usually proves to be harder than working with clients because your peers may chose a harder scenario to test your wits.

During role plays, the facilitator:

  • addresses possible resistance from participants.
  • gives rationale for the activity.
  • requires active involvement.
  • uses humor.
Quick Facts
  • Shows how to work with others.
  • Incorporates active listening, reaction, and feedback.

The facilitator:

  • addresses resistance and gives rationale.
  • plays an active role.
  • uses humor.


Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention | Phone: (505) 248-4182 | Fax: (505) 248-4188 | diabetesprogram@ihs.gov