IHS OSCAR Best and Promising Practices http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/index.cfm This is an RSS feed of the IHS OSCAR best and promising practices and local efforts that have been submitted and approved. Mon, 21 Apr 2014 15:51:11 GMT en-us Using Social Media to Engage Urban Youth http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=3E1AAC0B-B616-D4B4-53A9EEBA793F540C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=3E1AAC0B-B616-D4B4-53A9EEBA793F540C& Mon, 21 Apr 2014 15:51:11 GMT In this modern age clients are increasingly mobile, which makes it challenging for health providers to not only locate patients for follow up but also to target outreach to specific populations. Staff from the Native American Community Health Center [Native Health] in Phoenix, Arizona, recognized this issue and began using social media outlets such as Facebook and Twitter to better connect with youth patients in their behavioral health programs and engage them in follow up. This process also proved to be an effective way to build awareness of behavioral health issues that are often stigmatized, such as HIV. Realizing some success through this intial effort, Native Health extended the use of social media across the organization and began using it for patient follow up and to create awareness of events, services available, and health education topics among the public at large. Information that is to be disseminated in this manner is collected from all the departments once a week, and a designated staff member posts the information and monitors content to ensure that it is accurate and current. Native Health has found that this approach helps to maintain consistent messaging across the organization. Staff have also indicated that this approach provides a connection to the community that is both non-invasive and non-threatening while still providing a means to raise awareness and increase engagement in the community. Assessing Colorectal Cancer Screening Knowledge at Tribal Fairs http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=3294220C-07F8-0839-3FF3182BB8C0B8FA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=3294220C-07F8-0839-3FF3182BB8C0B8FA& Mon, 21 Apr 2014 11:04:16 GMT Colorectal Cancer [CRC] is one of the top causes of death for American Indians. Even though they experience fewer overall cases than non-Hispanic whites, American Indians are less likely to be diagnosed with CRC at an early stage. In order to assess knowledge of CRC risk, prevention, and screenings among American Indians, surveys were conducted at two Navajo tribal fairs. When compared to national trends, the outcome of this survey, primarily of adults living on the Navajo reservation, allowed researchers to draw conclusions on the broader implications of CRC awareness for the American Indian community. The survey results pointed to a strong relationship between education and colorectal cancer awareness. Adults with a high-school education or higher were twice as likely to be aware of CRC than those without. Subsequently, those who were aware of it also tended to be aware of the risks associated with it and had undergone screening. Not only was there a disparity between more educated and less educated individuals, there was a knowledge disparity between men and woman. Along with education and gender, the study points to spoken language [Navajo/English] and health status as elements with a relationship to CRC awareness and screening among American Indians, particularly those of the Navajo Nation. Culturally Tailored Cessation Program Reduces Tobacco among Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippe http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=323CFC2A-E9D3-3A13-A034249C119BB362 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=323CFC2A-E9D3-3A13-A034249C119BB362& Mon, 21 Apr 2014 11:04:02 GMT Native Americans are more likely to smoke and have more difficulty quitting than other populations, and there are few cessation programs that recognize the sacred cultural relationship between American Indians and tobacco usage. A tobacco cessation program conducted by the Fond du Lac Department of Public Health did not reduce tobacco usage, thus leading to the search for a culturally sensitive program for tribal members. The Fond du Lac Smoking Cessation program is based on the American Lung Association’s “Freedom from Smoking Curriculum” and employs both group and one-on-one counseling that incorporate tribal and cultural discussions that distinguish between abuse of commercial tobacco products and the appropriate use of tobacco in sacred ceremonies and prayer. Participants are eligible for free nicotine replacement or cessation medications. Participants are also provided support with diet, exercise, and weight management. Data gathered both 7 days and 90 days following completion of the program indicate substantial growth in the number of individuals who report not smoking [almost one-third in 7 days] as well as almost 50 percent decline in the number of cigarettes smoked among those participants who continued to smoke. American Indian Healthy Eating Project: Tools for Healthy Tribes http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=317D1D57-03BD-0D97-777E7DD5E04EC82D http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=317D1D57-03BD-0D97-777E7DD5E04EC82D& Mon, 21 Apr 2014 09:58:48 GMT To accelerate solution-oriented strategies for tribal-level action, the American Indian Healthy Eating Project at the University of North Carolina worked with seven North Carolina American Indian tribes to create Tools for Healthy Tribes. This policy toolkit provides technical assistance and tools on areas identified with the greatest potential to facilitate tribally led ways within the participating tribes to improve access to healthy, affordable foods. Lessons learned from tribal leaders and key informants were used to build the partnerships and the evidence base necessary to focus on and move forward the following approaches: • Tribally owned and operated community gardens. • Tribally owned and operated farmers’ markets. • Healthy powwow food and beverage options. • Healthy tribal store, mobile, and vending initiatives. • Healthy families, healthy food activities. The goal of this program is to use policy tools and technical assistance to strengthen the capacity of tribal leaders to develop, implement, and evaluate community change around healthy eating and active living. This program is conducted with the cooperation of ten North Carolina American Indian tribes and urban Indian organizations. The Healthy Eating Project has been promoted through these tribes and through a variety of tribal-sponsored activities as well as community-wide activities in which Native American populations participate. These activities are also associated with local health departments and schools in areas populated by tribal residents of North Carolina. Indian Health Care Resource Center IHS Children & Youth Program Pediatric Diabetes Risk Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C81542C0-0169-6573-F77D412B36777DEC http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C81542C0-0169-6573-F77D412B36777DEC& Fri, 18 Apr 2014 17:00:42 GMT Indian Health Care Resource Center is an urban Indian clinic providing services to the Tulsa metro area. We are seeing high numbers of childhood obesity cases, as is typical of most Indian clinics. In our youth ages 5 - 12, 30 are above the 85th percentile on BMI for age. Of the youth ages 13 - 18, 35 are above the 85th percentile on BMI for age. Based on this need, we have established several youth programs designed to combat the childhood obesity problem in hopes of reducing future cases of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. IHCRC collaborates with the Tulsa Public Schools Challenge Course to provide a summer day camp program that is designed to reduce the risk for diabetes in Native American children. A customized, culturally specific curriculum was developed that utilizes experiential learning activities Challenge Course high and low elements asset building and resiliency training. Children in grades 1 – 8 learn concepts of healthy lifestyles, including fitness, nutrition, and making positive decisions, which result in healthier life choices in the effort to prevent diabetes. Asset building and resiliency training develop the abilities that children need in order to make good choices. Parents report healthy lifestyle changes, such as children requesting that pop not be available at home. A healthy lunch and snack are provided. The camp serves over 170 at-risk children each summer, and is free to all participants. Tepp.org Smoking Cessation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E147-06D9-99AF-D943B935B1C93389 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E147-06D9-99AF-D943B935B1C93389& Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:49:53 GMT Tobacco Intervention Skills Certification training is offered for various roles: Basic Skills, Basic Skills Spanish, Basic Skills Native American, Basic Skills Instructor, Basic Skills Spanish Instructor, Tobacco Treatment Specialist and Tobacco Treatment. IHS Comprehensive Injury Prevention Training Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E08B-D07C-420A-38CEE77D997AC73B http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E08B-D07C-420A-38CEE77D997AC73B& Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:40:01 GMT The Indian Health Service has a comprehensive Injury Prevention Training Program. Courses are offered to all Indian Health Service and Tribal personnel through the Environmental Health Support Center in Albuquerque, and in each Area by the local Injury Prevention Program. Currently, there are three courses that are offered: Introduction to Injury Prevention, Intermediate Injury Prevention and Advanced Injury Prevention. In addition to these courses, there are two separate year-long training fellowship programs available for both Indian Health Service and Tribal personnel. Additional information regarding the training program is available here on the site. Wellbriety! Magazine - White Bison Online Magazine http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DEB7-09D4-CCAB-8E9161F54808D2BD http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DEB7-09D4-CCAB-8E9161F54808D2BD& Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:26:53 GMT During the entrance ceremony, the 100 Eagle Feather Hoop of the Nations will be carried in by members of your own community to begin the day. The Hoop carries the gifts of Healing, Hope, Unity and the Power to Forgive the Unforgivable. It has traveled Turtle Island so many times since 1995 to communities like yours that seek healing from substance abuse, domestic violence, and other struggles of Indian and non-Native people. The Hoops Grand Entry marks the start of a day of miracles for the community. Suicide Prevention Training Programs http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DD5F-AEF6-56F1-A2A105A998F80CC8 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DD5F-AEF6-56F1-A2A105A998F80CC8& Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:21:20 GMT Since 1982, the Suicide Prevention Training Programs [SPTP] has offered award winning training workshops to over 50,000 people in Alberta, Canada and around the world. The website offers toolkits, webinars, and articles. Minnesota Center Against Violence and Abuse http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DB8B-C51D-AF65-8E2CE5249E35D740 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DB8B-C51D-AF65-8E2CE5249E35D740& Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:15:58 GMT A clearinghouse training resources for trainers and organizations that are looking for published violence prevention training manuals, curricula and teaching resources to assist them with violence prevention training. Topics are: Child Abuse, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Elder Abuse, Human Rights, Peacemaking, Sexual Violence, Stalking, Workplace Violence and Youth Violence. Wind River Reservation: Morning Star Manor http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D9E5-9AEE-5E32-9D51971B96C0797F http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D9E5-9AEE-5E32-9D51971B96C0797F& Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:11:38 GMT Morning Star Manor is located on the Wind River Reservation and has been open since July, 1985. The Manor is owned and managed by the Shoshone Tribe. It is an Intermediate Care Facility. There are also beds licensed for skilled nursing care. It is a 50 bed facility with two private rooms and 24 semi-private rooms. Morning Star Manor contracts with Lander Valley Medical Center to provide physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. An activities department provides activities. Nursing services are provided 24 hours a day. Alzheimer care and specialized treatment plans are provided. Other services such as restorative care, social services and spirituality are also available. Aberdeen Area Youth Regional Treatment Center http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D716-D73D-44CD-3E2EE8EC6CAAEF80 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D716-D73D-44CD-3E2EE8EC6CAAEF80& Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:00:20 GMT The Aberdeen Area Youth Regional Treatment Center [AAYRTC] is dedicated to restoring balance and harmony in mind, body, and spirit to the Native American youth and their families. The AAYRTC blends Native American traditions and current therapeutic techniques into a holistic multidisciplinary team approach to enhance self-esteem, respect, and promote a healthy lifestyle. The Aberdeen Area Youth Regional Treatment Center "Chief Gall" is a 20 bed residential adolescent treatment center with four family suites. The usual length of stay for residents is 60 days. Comprehensive assessments allow staff to tailor individual treatment plans that address each resident’s uniqueness. Residents will be treated with dignity and respect in an environment that honors positive personal beliefs. It is the belief of AAYRTC that the youth need a cultural/spiritual foundation on which to build their future. Na PuUwai - Hawaii http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D977-03C6-47BE-196B3412A2AF0440 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D977-03C6-47BE-196B3412A2AF0440& Thu, 17 Apr 2014 15:53:02 GMT Na PuUwai is a 501[c] [3] tax-exempt organization formed in 1985 to assist in a collaborative heart study of Native Hawaiians on Molokai. A year later it undertook the landmark study on the traditional Hawaiian diet and in 1990 became the Native Hawaiian Health Care System serving the islands of Moloka’i and Lana’i as identified in the Native Hawaiian Health Care Improvement Act of 1988 [P.L. 100-579]. The organization administers funds from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, and private resources. The vision is of "self-reliant Native Hawaiian communities serviced by a community-owned, land-based, and financially stable health care system providing fully reimbursable health and medical services." Its mission is "to improve the health conditions of Native Hawaiians on Moloka’i and Lana’i by maximizing their capacity to access and influence the establishment of a health care system responsive to and respectful of their cultural beliefs and customs." The major activities are to: a] facilitate access to health care for Native Hawaiians through appropriate outreach and referral services, transportation services, and collaborative efforts with health service providers b] monitor individual Native Hawaiian blood pressures, sugars, and weights c] provide physical examinations to Native Hawaiians d] hold health screenings in collaboration with other agencies for otitis media, cardio-vascular risk, diabetes, and cancer in women, and e] coordinate immunization, asthma, diabetes and nutrition educational workshops for the Moloka’i and Lana’i communities. Community Parenting Education program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=8B7E925A-CBE5-9CBA-089F50917F691FE7 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=8B7E925A-CBE5-9CBA-089F50917F691FE7& Wed, 19 Mar 2014 09:46:20 GMT Monthly community parenting class is based on the requests of the parents. Parents requested to have the classes on a weekend because of their jobs, babysitting needs, and cost of gas. The 8-lessons focuses on parents leadership/role-modeling, children’s roles in the family, adult relationships, impact of changes, problem-solving, family values regarding drugs, alcohol, sex, violence, home safety, nutrition, physical activity and prevention of child abuse/neglect. The curriculum is based on the Family Wellness with Navajo traditional teachings included. Attendees are referred from family courts and foster parenting agencies. Some participants are volunteers. The average attendance is 22. Pre/post tests were administered. Parents’ comments on "How will you improve your parenting skills?" are collected. Brief Strategic Family Therapy [BSFT] http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=63C0C244-D1BD-B3B1-EEF409ADB3D81938 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=63C0C244-D1BD-B3B1-EEF409ADB3D81938& Tue, 18 Mar 2014 13:32:59 GMT Brief Strategic Family Therapy [BSFT] is a family-based intervention designed to prevent and treat child and adolescent behavior problems. BSFT targets children and adolescents who are displaying—or are at risk for developing—behavior problems, including substance abuse. BSFT is based on the fundamental assumption that adaptive family interactions can play a pivotal role in protecting children from negative influences and that maladaptive family interactions can contribute to the evolution of behavior problems and consequently are a primary target for intervention. The goal of BSFT is to improve a youth’s behavior problems by improving family interactions that are presumed to be directly related to the child’s symptoms, thus reducing risk factors and strengthening protective factors for adolescent drug abuse and other conduct problems. The therapy is tailored to target the particular problem interactions and behaviors in each client family. Therapists seek to change maladaptive family interaction patterns by coaching family interactions as they occur in session to create the opportunity for new, more functional interactions to emerge. Major techniques used are joining [engaging and entering the family system], diagnosing [identifying maladaptive interactions and family strengths], and restructuring [transforming maladaptive interactions]. BSFT is a short-term, problem-oriented intervention. A typical session lasts 60 to 90 minutes. The average length of treatment is 12 to 15 sessions over more than 3 months. For more severe cases, such as substance-abusing adolescents, the average number of sessions and length of treatment may be doubled. Treatment can take place in office, home, or community settings. Health Action New Mexico Assists American Indians with Affordable Care Act http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=FE978820-C32E-A886-5A6D124FC65BF470 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=FE978820-C32E-A886-5A6D124FC65BF470& Wed, 12 Mar 2014 12:05:16 GMT Health Action New Mexico [HANM] is a recognized consumer advocacy organization that promotes health care reform in New Mexico. It is the lead agency of a statewide collaborative, the Health Care for All Campaign, is working to achieve equitable, quality, and affordable health care for all people living in New Mexico. HANM is dedicated to working with the leaders of Native American communities to advocate for improvements in health care resources and policies that will benefit American Indian populations. HANM leadership and staff are particularly interested in listening to and developing meaningful relationships with American Indian leaders. HANM listens to prominent tribal leaders in order to gain an understanding of longstanding tribal views and practices regarding politics, history, and health. HANM has the capacity to work with AIAN leaders to develop strategies to address these priorities. Once key issues are identified, HANM can provide policy support and leverage their connections to create public platforms through which American Indian leaders can advance their interests. This is a collaborative effort where American Indian leaders have the opportunity to be heard at key decision-making points. In particular, HANM seeks to know what value they can add to help achieve what tribal leaders want for their communities, particularly with regard to the new and expanding access to health care services through the Affordable Care Act. Tribal leaders have taken an active role in health care advocacy and health reform implementation, regularly attending health marketplace board meetings and initiating discussions relevant to their communities. Native American leaders will also play a key role in the development of tribal centers and a statewide workgroup that will monitor implementation of the Affordable Care Act in Native American communities. Strengthened relationships have also led to collaborative outreach efforts with trusted community members to educate people and enroll them in new health coverage options. Ongoing participation by Native American tribal leaders has not only strengthened their advocacy voices, but has institutionalized their influence through representation on the health marketplace board. Journey of Hope Family Weekend http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4A841375-9D97-6457-C437C170002927C0 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4A841375-9D97-6457-C437C170002927C0& Tue, 11 Mar 2014 16:19:26 GMT Since 2009, we have offered a family weekend at Greenlake, WI a resort area. It is designed to expose families to a variety of physical activity for little cost. The family weekend event runs from Friday evening until noon on Sunday. Saturday morning is spent in interactive educational sessions covering many topics such as healthy snacks, zumba, tae kwon do, relaxation techniques, moccasin game and much more. Saturday afternoon is spent participating activities such as volleyball, kickball, biking, hiking, golfing, disc golf etc. Saturday evening is spent with Native American drumming, singing and dancing. Meals, snacks and rooms are provided for participants. Over the past three years, we have had over 400 participants. Preliminary Lessons Learned from “Native Navigators and the Cancer Continuum [NNACC] http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=FE1F3223-F522-10F6-0F8C87850F43D810 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=FE1F3223-F522-10F6-0F8C87850F43D810& Tue, 11 Mar 2014 15:31:54 GMT The Native American Cancer Research Corporation [NACR] implemented community-based participatory research [CBPR] in 1988, and they began to employ community-based patient navigators in 1994. The navigators’ original focus was on early detection and screening, but later expanded to include support services after patients were diagnosed with cancer. As the American Indian population has become increasingly mobile in recent years—periodically moving from reservation to urban area and back again, some American Indian cancer patients have become disconnected from these programs, or they never were aware of American Indian cancer navigators. In response, NACR developed a new initiative to increase the visibility of local “Native Navigators” and to improve prevention and early detection services to American Indian community members in these more fluid settings. Each participating American Indian community organized twelve 2-hour training sessions during the year that were presented by the Native Navigator for that community. Four main cancer topics were presented: prevention, early detection, quality of life/survivorship, and palliation. Training session slides are available for review at http://www.natamcancer.org/. Each community also had the opportunity to modify some of the workshops to meet their specific local needs. An audience response system [ARS] was used to anonymously collect basic information and responses to questions from the participants. This and other information was collected for later evaluation of the program’s success in the various tribal settings. Family fun events such as health fairs, bingo games, and outdoor picnics served as the introduction to the year-long series of training sessions, and a wrap-up family fun event was held three months after the last training event. These wrap-up events provided an opportunity for the Native Navigators to present the results of the training and to collect additional information about the participants. The results of these workshops over a three-year period were a greater than 25 percent increase in cancer knowledge among participants, increased requests for help in scheduling and completing cancer screening or diagnostic appointments among workshop participants, and an overall increase in the visibility of the Native Navigators in the communities they serve. “This resulted in patients with cancer receiving improvements in timeliness and quality of care.” Bright Futures at Georgetown University http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D542-DD62-F276-3CE7FDF021BD0AE0 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D542-DD62-F276-3CE7FDF021BD0AE0& Mon, 10 Mar 2014 10:39:07 GMT The guide provides developmental guidelines on physical activity for the periods of infancy through adolescence. It also provides current information on screening, assessment, and counseling to promote physical activity and to meet the needs of health professionals, families, and communities. Living Yesterday for Tomorrow http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=BE7D1B46-CE5C-65F0-05F1667DA5295C67 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=BE7D1B46-CE5C-65F0-05F1667DA5295C67& Mon, 10 Mar 2014 10:38:32 GMT Reducing the incidence of diabetes and cardiovascular disease requires increasing people’s knowledge of healthy lifestyle choices and increasing their physical activity. Data from the Indian Health Service National Patient Information Reporting System indicate that in 2009 the age-adjusted percentage of the population 20 years and older with diagnosed diabetes was 16.1 percent for American Indians and Alaska Natives compared with 7.1 percent among non-Hispanic whites, 11.8 percent among Hispanics, and 12.1 percent among non-Hispanic blacks. In addition, American Indian and Alaska Native youth aged 10-19 were nine times more likely to be diagnosed with type-II diabetes than were non-Hispanic whites in the same age group. Program Description Living Yesterday for Tomorrow [LYFT] was implemented by the Washoe Tribal Health Center to address these two issues. The program employed the Together Raising Awareness for Indian Life [TRAIL] curriculum that was developed by the Indian Health Service [IHS], the National Congress of American Indians [NCAI], Boys & Girls Clubs of America [BGCA], FirstPic, Inc. and Nike, Inc. to reduce the onset of diabetes among Native American youth. The LYFT program supported each colony of the tribe in planning and carrying out different trips and physical fitness activities for youth age 12-18. Emphasis was placed on developing culturally relevant skills within the context of engaging physical activities and learning about nutrition such as hiking, camping, and hunting and gathering. The program focused on healthy lifestyle changes in diet and exercise, building self-esteem and self-confidence, and developing interpersonal and leadership skills. LYFT coordinated and sponsored year-round lifestyle improvement programs for cohorts of youth that participated for the full year. These programs included 3 to 4 nights camping excursions, hiking trips, mountain climbing, nutrition and cooking sessions, fishing, hunting, pine nut picking, acorn gathering, fish basket weaving, and sport teams [boys’ and girls’ softball and basketball]. Participation in these programs resulted in strengthened physical activity endurance as the level and duration of physical challenges increased throughout the year. In addition to exercise programs, an outdoor confidence course, providing healthy options at cultural gatherings, a year-round greenhouse, and cholesterol screenings were also offered through the LYFT program. Program Outcomes LYFT was successful in decreasing the average BMI [age adjusted] from 34.65 to 20.31 over the three-year duration of the program. In addition, LYFT resulted in increased physical activity and consumption of fruits and vegetables while at the same time reducing the amount of sugary beverages that were consumed. Health education materials that emphasized healthy lifestyle choices were created and disseminated. The LYFT program was also successful in increasing internal capacity of the Washoe Tribal Health Center to conduct risk factor assessments by obtaining cholesterol screening equipment, a stadiometer, an accurate scale, and training to use the equipment. This allowed Health Center staff to monitor program participants’ progress and will provide a basis for measuring community progress over time. Alaska Public Health Training Network http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E195-B63A-6B82-628C38FCD6818059 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E195-B63A-6B82-628C38FCD6818059& Fri, 14 Feb 2014 09:55:21 GMT Alaska Public Health Training Network (APHTN) is a distance learning system for public health staff and general public. It broadcasts programs every Thursday morning from the UAS over UATV. Mending the Sacred Hoop Technical Assistance Project http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E05D-C64A-01FF-6E196DC15010A8AE http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E05D-C64A-01FF-6E196DC15010A8AE& Fri, 14 Feb 2014 09:51:46 GMT Mending the Sacred Hoop Technical Assistance Project. MSH-TA is a Native American program that provides training and technical assistance to American Indian and Alaskan Native relations in the effort to eliminate violence in the lives of women and their children. We work with villages, reservations, rancherias, and pueblos across the United States to improve the justice system, law enforcement, and service provider response to the issues of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking in Native communities. The National Indian Child Welfare Association http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DDBD-C988-BD6C-4A224C6BD7DFB12C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DDBD-C988-BD6C-4A224C6BD7DFB12C& Fri, 14 Feb 2014 09:33:45 GMT NICWA provides a wide range of trainings and technical assistance to tribes upon request. Please call to discuss trainings and to confirm prices. Travel expenses and curriculum materials are extra. Hui Malama Ola Na ‘Oiwi - Hawaii http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D958-B18E-D298-D0BD35623A01F1D1 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D958-B18E-D298-D0BD35623A01F1D1& Fri, 14 Feb 2014 09:23:52 GMT Hui Malama Ola Na ‘Oiwi is a 501(c) (3) tax-exempt organization originally formed in 1985 as part of Alu Like, Inc.’s community health initiative in the Puna area of Hawaii. Community leaders, health professionals and technicians, lawyers, and educators met in response to the Puna Hui ‘Ohana’s concern about the reluctance of Native Hawaiians to seek timely medical care. The initial organization was formed as a result of that meeting. In 1990, it became one of the Native Hawaiian Health Care Systems in accordance with the Native Hawaiian Health Care Improvement Act of 1988 (P.L. 100-579). It administers funds from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, and private resources. The vision is of a Native Hawaiian community at health and wellness parity with Hawaiians that embraces cultural values and respects the independent balance between people with one another; people with their natural environment; and people with their spiritual beliefs. The major activities are to: a) facilitate access to health care for Native Hawaiians through appropriate outreach and referral services, transportation services, and collaborative efforts with health service providers; b) perform health risk appraisals for Native Hawaiians; c) conduct educational clinics for diabetes, substance abuse, and obesity, and d) assist Native Hawaiians with problem solving through traditional Hawaiian techniques such as ho’oponopono. HoOla Lahui - Hawaii http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D949-9B56-3EBE-96137E1ECA761475 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D949-9B56-3EBE-96137E1ECA761475& Fri, 14 Feb 2014 09:22:33 GMT HoOla Lahui Hawaii is a 501[c] [3] tax-exempt organization originally formed in 1985 by a group of concerned Native Hawaiian health professionals and residents of Kaua’i and Ni’ihau who wanted to stem the alarming death rates of Native Hawaiians. In 1990 the organization assumed its current form as one of the Native Hawaiian Health Care Systems identified in the Native Hawaiian Health Care Improvement Act of 1988 [P.L. 100-579]. The organization administers funds from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, and private resources. The vision is a “thriving and healthy Native Hawaiian Community.” The mission is “to preserve and perpetuate the Native Hawaiian race and achieve community wellness by developing innovative and culturally appropriate health programs. The major activities are to: a] facilitate access to health care for Hawaiians through appropriate outreach and referral services, transportation services, and collaborative efforts with health service providers b] develop health-related educational programs in nutrition, cardiovascular risk, obesity, diabetes, and cancer, and c] provide screening services for high-risk diseases as well as immunizations. Hui No Ke Ola Pono - Hawaii http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D929-DBD1-D023-5FFA7C542AF96768 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D929-DBD1-D023-5FFA7C542AF96768& Fri, 14 Feb 2014 09:16:55 GMT Hui No Ke Ola Pono is a 501[c] [3] tax-exempt organization formed in response to the Native Hawaiian Health Care Improvement Act of 1988 [P.O. 100-579]. Beginning in 1990, the organization administered funds from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, and private resources. The vision is of a Hawaiian community without barriers to quality health care and integrated modern medical care with traditional Hawaiian values, beliefs and practices that allow the Native population to thrive. The mission is to elevate the health status of Native Hawaiians in a non-threatening, culturally acceptable manner. The major activities are: a] facilitate access to health care for Native Hawaiians through appropriate outreach and referral services, transportation services, and collaborative efforts with health care providers and b] provide educational counseling and screenings in health related fields such as nutrition, diabetes, otitis media, and hypertension. Visions is a Centre of Innovation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D8FA-9251-6E08-CCEBE8B4135FDFB3 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D8FA-9251-6E08-CCEBE8B4135FDFB3& Fri, 14 Feb 2014 09:15:01 GMT Visions is a Centre of Innovation committed to developing and communicating a deeper understanding of Aboriginal population health. Aboriginal identity, traditions, culture and relationship patterns are integrated in the delivery of the Visions mandate. Visions focuses upon the priorities of Aboriginal people for improvement of Aboriginal population health with a health promotion focus how Aboriginal people and their organizations can address these priorities through innovation in health promotion and how the health system and the private sector can expand and support the development of Aboriginal population health. Tribal Pesticide Program Council http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D82F-9EA6-6113-7694347D138D47A2 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D82F-9EA6-6113-7694347D138D47A2& Fri, 14 Feb 2014 08:57:37 GMT In September 1999, an EPA cooperative agreement was awarded to Native Ecology Initiative [NEI] to organize a national group -- the Tribal Pesticide Program Council [TPPC]. Membership will initially include 30 Tribes that now have EPA pesticide programs and a number of Tribes with pesticide interests. The TPPC will promote and enhance tribal pesticide program development, raise pesticide issues important to Tribes and their people, and deal with policy at the national level. TPPC issues will include pesticide registration, training, enforcement, certification, ground water, disposal, and spray drift. The national group gives Tribes a mechanism for communication and organization similar to that provided by the State FIFRA Issues Research and Evaluation Group [SFIREG] for the States. The TPPC is a tribal technical resource and program and policy dialogue and development group, focused on pesticide issues and concerns. It is composed of authorized representatives from federally recognized tribes and Indian nations and intertribal organizations. Breasfeed HHS.gov http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D522-979E-7496-C50C9FBB3FC428E5 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D522-979E-7496-C50C9FBB3FC428E5& Fri, 14 Feb 2014 08:49:49 GMT NWHIC has partnered with La Leche League International to train our Information Specialists so they can help you with common breastfeeding issues such as nursing positions, questions about pumping and storage, and provide you with the support moms and dads need to make breastfeeding a success. The Helpline [which operates in both English and Spanish] can also provide tips for working moms who would like to continue breastfeeding, and offer suggestions for financial support. The Helpline is open to nursing mothers as well as their partners, families, prospective parents, health professionals and institutions seeking to better educate new mothers about the benefits of breastfeeding. Please note that the Helpline is an information and referral service only and we cannot provide a medical diagnosis, or answer medical questions. All medical questions should be directed to a healthcare provider. Framingham Heart Study Online risk assessment tool http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E638-DCA7-816A-182DDA1B5F84BED2 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E638-DCA7-816A-182DDA1B5F84BED2& Wed, 12 Feb 2014 15:56:44 GMT Online risk assessment tool that uses information from the Framingham Heart Study to predict a person?s chance of having a heart attack in the next 10 years. This tool is designed for adults aged 20 and older who do not have heart disease or diabetes. Path to Understanding Cancer Manual and Support Materials http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=A62F0ED1-D188-7025-4B7273BA7609532F http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=A62F0ED1-D188-7025-4B7273BA7609532F& Tue, 04 Feb 2014 17:09:21 GMT The Path to Understanding Cancer manual was developed with and for Alaska’s Community Health Workers [CHWs] in 1999 to provide basic cancer information and is continually updated to include medically- accurate information and to respond to CHWs’ expressed needs. The course manual, ‘Understanding Cancer’, includes 9 sections: 1] Self-Care, 2] Wellness Ways to Prevent and Decrease Cancer Risk, 3] Cancer and Our genes, 4] Understanding Cancer Basics, 5] Cancer Treatments: What to Expect, 6] Cancer Pain: Assessment and Management and 7] Loss, Grief and End-of-Life Comfort Care 8] Resources and 9] Community Activities. To extend CHWs’ knowledge and provide tools for patient education and community outreach, diverse cancer education materials were created. These included: three booklets, a flip chart, three interactive CD-ROMs, three Readers’ Theatre scripts, five movies, and CHW digital stories. Extensive evaluation of the Path to Understanding Cancer courses and supplementary materials has included group discussions, written evaluations, extended-interval telephone interviews, and mailed and internet surveys. Check box and open-ended questions were included for participants to share their feelings and comments about both cancer courses and materials. Initially, during a 5-year project span the 5-day, face-to-face course was provided 21 times for 168 Community Health Aides/Practitioners from 94 different Alaska communities. Written end-of-course evaluations were completed by 93 [157/168] of course participants, with 100 recommending the course for all CHWs as well as for other interested people. In addition to an increase in cancer knowledge and understanding, participants identified positive ways the course would impact their behavior: 89 [139/157] wrote health ways they intended to take better care of themselves, 90 [142/157] wrote about ways they now felt differently about cancer and 97 [153/157] wrote about how this course would help them improve the ways they take care of their patients. Extended-interval, post-course telephone interviews with 128 of 168 participants in Alaska revealed: 91 were more comfortable talking about cancer, 57 had increased patient referrals for cancer screening and 81 had increased cancer education they provided during patient encounters. Select publications describing the cancer manual and curriculum Kuhnley, R. & Cueva, M. [2011] Learning About Cancer Has Brightened My Light. Cancer Education for Alaska Community Health Aides and Community Health Practitioners [CHA/Ps] Journal of Cancer Education. 26 [3] 522-29. Cueva, M., Kuhnley, R. & Cueva, K. [2012] Enhancing Cancer Education Through the Arts: Building Connections with Alaska Native People, Cultures, and Communities. International Journal of Lifelong Education. 31 [4] 341-357. Cueva, M., Lanier, A., Kuhnley, R., & Dignan, M. [2008] Cancer Education: A Catalyst for Dialogue and Action. The IHS Primary Care Provider. 33 [1] 1-5. HIV Center of Excellence http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FA6B-DB89-6269-28CC511D17755C9B http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FA6B-DB89-6269-28CC511D17755C9B& Thu, 16 Jan 2014 17:27:02 GMT The HIV Center of Excellence (HIVCOE) is a clinically based center for HIV prevention, care, medical treatment, and research. The program was initiated to address the escalating need for provision of comprehensive care and treatment of HIV/AIDS conditions Native American Pathways-HIV Prevention Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=5FE9CD2A-9F19-5536-61787221684B51DC http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=5FE9CD2A-9F19-5536-61787221684B51DC& Wed, 27 Nov 2013 14:16:02 GMT Native American Pathways is a HIV prevention program through NATIVE HEALTH that offers free rapid HIV testing. The client receives their confidential results in 10 minutes. Please call 602-279-5262 x3212 to set up an appointment. Shiprock Community Advocacy Team http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=8FA8FA37-92FE-36C7-07619C4CFB609F40 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=8FA8FA37-92FE-36C7-07619C4CFB609F40& Wed, 27 Nov 2013 14:13:04 GMT The Shiprock Community Advocacy Team exists to build capacity in the community for health and wellness, especially around obesity prevention, diabetes, and youth success. Members come from various walks of life, such as citizens, health care providers , and community center workers. Meetings are held more frequently when there are immediate concerns to work on together. The group advocates for various worthy causes in the community such as playground building and support of ongoing programs that are making a difference in the community. It is in the beginning stages, but has strong participation and support. Training in Community Advocacy was held for the community citizens. Best Dam 5K Run/Walk http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4283591D-0A46-5B2A-E283E264FAFE9595 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4283591D-0A46-5B2A-E283E264FAFE9595& Fri, 22 Nov 2013 11:49:11 GMT The Wagner Area Health and Wellness Consortium was born in November of 2004. The group was formed in an effort to improve health and wellness services to community members. In the summer of 2011, the Consortium sponsored the 1st Annual Best Dam 5K Run/Walk, with 100 participants in attendance. The mission of the Wagner Area Health and Wellness Consortium is to combine resources of each entity to maximize the health and wellness opportunities for Wagner and surrounding communities. The consortium emphasizes youth education and activities to promote improved health and wellness now and in the future. Special Diabetes Program for Indians [SDPI] Healthy Heart Initiative http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4155CAC2-A7F9-E546-D78C1D56ACF214AF http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4155CAC2-A7F9-E546-D78C1D56ACF214AF& Fri, 22 Nov 2013 11:48:28 GMT In 2004, Congress established the SDPI Demonstration projects as an initiative to apply research findings in real-world settings to prevent diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The SDPI Demonstration project consists of two initiatives: The SDPI Diabetes Prevention Program and the SDPI Healthy Heart Initiative. These programs have been successful at providing diabetes care and prevention activities to the communities served. Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Care Team for Behavioral Health http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=41F590ED-93FF-752F-B4B071FA3612D4E3 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=41F590ED-93FF-752F-B4B071FA3612D4E3& Fri, 22 Nov 2013 11:48:00 GMT The Multidisciplinary Team within the Behavioral Health Program has been instrumental in obtaining State Licensure of the Behavioral Health Programs located in Omaha, Lincoln and Norfolk, Nebraska and Iowa Licensure as a Behavioral Health Program located in Sioux City, Iowa. This included developing policy and procedures for both the State of Nebraska and the State of Iowa to meet the respective states criteria, utilizing the expertise in obtaining funding for Mental Health and Substance Abuse services from the State of Nebraska, obtaining Medicaid provider numbers for staff and for the program, obtaining credentialing with Megellan of Iowa and Nebraska, and utilizing the expertise of the SA counselor in making certain that all client records were meeting standards of care, developing quality improvement criteria, and assisting other providers in learning how to utilize Accu-Care to its highest potential. Wellness Prescriptions http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=65EB48AE-ABFE-6E1D-A1C3C8D80F187A7D http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=65EB48AE-ABFE-6E1D-A1C3C8D80F187A7D& Fri, 22 Nov 2013 11:47:10 GMT “Wellness Prescriptions” contain recommendations of health nutrition and lifestyle choices. They serve as a referral for free membership to the YMCA if 19 years of age or discounted membership if older, and /or referral to our Wellness Center. “Wellness Prescriptions” include instructions for follow up visits, fasting labs, and referrals to a nutritionist or the Wellness Center. Winnebago HIV/AIDS Fair http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=65810ABA-B27D-E338-7641506C7E59DF19 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=65810ABA-B27D-E338-7641506C7E59DF19& Fri, 22 Nov 2013 11:46:32 GMT The Winnebago HIV/AIDS Awareness fair was targeted for youth in grades 7th-12th grade from the Winnebago Public School, students and staff of the Little Priest Tribal College, and all adults in the community. Activities at the fair included HIV rapid testing, Hepatitis C and STD testing and the dissemination of appropriate awareness and prevention materials. Family planning information was also included. Go Red For Women http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=A0770810-B642-FFB0-B2A0495CB6194E7C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=A0770810-B642-FFB0-B2A0495CB6194E7C& Fri, 22 Nov 2013 11:46:02 GMT Go Red for Women is a community based initiative to raise awareness in Women’s health, prevention of heart disease, and breast cancer. The project brought together women of all ages from the Winnebago Community for an evening of fun and learning on how to prevent heart disease. Spring Into Mental Health http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=9F65BFFE-0773-4CA5-B1830C7CFED72D00 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=9F65BFFE-0773-4CA5-B1830C7CFED72D00& Fri, 22 Nov 2013 11:45:38 GMT Spring Into Mental Health 2009 and 2010 was a free 2-day community event that provided up-to-date mental health information and education. Spring into Mental Health is organized and provided by the Department of Human Service, Quentin N. Burdick Memorial HealthCare Facility. This annual event is scheduled in May in conjunction with National Mental Health month. This 2-day event focuses on providing educational information, interactive participation, and personal healing to both professionals and general community members. The purpose of this event is twofold. The primary goal is to promote holistic wellness and decrease the stigma associated with seeking mental health services in Indian county. Also, this conference highlights our local Native mental health professionals, providing a platform to share their knowledge, experience, and willingness to help others. Flu Shot Clinic Campaign http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=41B3B702-CE3E-F883-4291567BF5703A0E http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=41B3B702-CE3E-F883-4291567BF5703A0E& Fri, 22 Nov 2013 11:44:52 GMT The Flu Shot Campaign was an effort to educate all members of the community on the importance of being protected against influenza, and then offering multiple opportunities for community members to access their influenza immunizations at specifically arranged venues lead by Dr. Huguet. Yankton Sioux TB Grant http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=78B58B95-BE9F-FA21-42980BE9FA6ECFD2 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=78B58B95-BE9F-FA21-42980BE9FA6ECFD2& Fri, 22 Nov 2013 11:39:44 GMT During a community wide outbreak of Tuberculosis that occurred in Wagner, SD area from 2009 through 2010, Gary was directly involved in the daunting task of ensuring that all of the diagnosed cases of TB and identified contacts of the cases were complaint with and completed taking their prescribed courses of treatment through administering Directly Observed Therapy. In addition, Gary also assisted in gathering additional patient information on those individuals who had moved from the area following their initial exposures to TB. Gary’s services within the Wagner community are not limited to TB control activities. He recently saved the life of a young boy who had served lacerated his arm during a bike accident and was bleeding profusely. Gary was able to control the bleeding and ensure that the young man received immediate medical care which included the child receiving 100 stitches. Taking Back our Communities:Gang Prevention Stategies for Tribal Communities http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=E2F877D8-F244-1D65-4A18C18557B096C4 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=E2F877D8-F244-1D65-4A18C18557B096C4& Fri, 22 Nov 2013 11:37:05 GMT "Taking Back our Communites: Gang Prevention Strategies for Tribal Communities" is a tool kit including a 7 minutes trigger video and 27 minutes training video. The kit was developed to help stimulate discussion and provide details about our 3 key messages: gangs are a serious problem in tribal communities, effective strategies for reducing gang violence, and resources available. The DVDs and training materials are used to assist other communities in addressing gang violence through implementation of the Gang Prevention through Intervention, Prevention and Suppression model. Protecting You/Protecting Me http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=42F4BD63-D199-5C82-937CC29B408B844E http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=42F4BD63-D199-5C82-937CC29B408B844E& Fri, 22 Nov 2013 11:20:10 GMT The Protecting You/Protecting Me curriculum provides a series of 40 science- and health-based lessons [eight lessons for each grade 1 through 5] that are designed to be incorporated into a school’s core curriculum and meet required educational standards. The scope and sequence of the lessons are designed to deliver content that’s age- and grade-appropriate. And the sessions are different lengths, depending on the ability of children to focus and understand. PY/PM is the only curriculum that teaches children how to protect themselves and make informed decisions about alcohol based on the latest brain research. The curriculum covers specific ways to handle difficult situations such as reducing the risks if riding with a driver who is not alcohol-free. In addition, the lessons cover a variety of life skills including media awareness, stress management, resistance strategies, decision-making and communication. Students learn these skills and information through group activities, structured discussion, role-play, exploring real life topics and issues, and parent involvement Ti Nideene- Playgrounds for Shiprock http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=8EFEFB4C-0617-4273-C940326AEF7959D9 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=8EFEFB4C-0617-4273-C940326AEF7959D9& Tue, 01 Oct 2013 10:27:06 GMT Advocating for playgrounds in the Shiprock community. Three areas are being worked on: Joint use agreements with schools and day care improving what already exists in the community and building new equipment. Steps: 1. assess current facilities in the community- who "controls" them and whether they are accessible 2. build community buy-in and consciousness of the importance of play and willingness to tackle the issues surrounding playgrounds [liability, maintenance, safety] 3. form groups of people to do planning , fund-raising, etc. 4. put people to work on the playgrounds [access, updating, building] 5. encourage community members in continued maintenance of the equipment. So far, the assessment has been made and community discussions have been started. APLS-Pediatric Lecture Series http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=6947E268-93A9-7192-00A30D1BB9B53407 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=6947E268-93A9-7192-00A30D1BB9B53407& Tue, 01 Oct 2013 10:24:56 GMT Utilizing the APLS Pediatric Emergency medicine Curricula, the APLS-Pediatric lecture Series was a 2 day APLS training course provided by guest lecture experts in the field of pediatrics. Training courses were offered live via the internet with the help and support of the Sioux San & Aberdeen Area Indian health Service IT Departments. Medicine Moon Run http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=9BB75E41-93BE-918C-A3CA3A43575420B7 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=9BB75E41-93BE-918C-A3CA3A43575420B7& Tue, 01 Oct 2013 10:24:10 GMT The Medicine Moon is an annual 1/2 Marathon that takes place on the Turtle Mountain Reservation in Belcourt, ND during the month of August [traditionally known as the time when our medicine is ripe]. It is sponsored by a small local committee, Balanced Living in Native Communities [BLINC] that was formed in 2009 to promote healthy living in our community. The committee was formed based on their common interest in living life in a balanced way- spiritually, culturally, psychologically, and physically. All of the committee members have past experience with running marathons or organizing wellness events. “What’s the Big Deal?”: A Colorectal Cancer [CRC] Screening Readers’ Theatre http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=A5F00202-A095-D86F-8639D46BE89B0E9C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=A5F00202-A095-D86F-8639D46BE89B0E9C& Mon, 29 Apr 2013 15:26:40 GMT What’s the Big Deal?, a 25-minute Readers’ Theatre script was developed to provide colorectal cancer [CRC] screening information, share ways to discuss CRC screening, increase comfort with talking about CRC, and encourage healthy lifestyle choices for Alaska Native and American Indian Community Health Workers [CHW] and the people in their communities. Colorectal cancer [CRC] is the second leading cause of cancer mortality for Alaska Native and American Indian people, yet through colonoscopy screening to find and remove polyps early cancer incidence and mortality can be decreased. Readers Theatre is the coming together of a group of people to read aloud a conversation that has been scripted. Participants volunteer to actively participate as a listener or to read aloud a specific character of their choosing, regardless of gender or age. Through Reader’s Theatre, participants have an opportunity to read the voice and feel the emotion of a different gender, age, and life experience. People, reading their chosen roles, sit among the listeners in a circle. Both readers and listeners are given a copy of the script to read aloud or to follow along and listen. Readers Theatre has been shared over the radio, as a dinner theatre performance, in a classroom setting, and as a community event. Readers’ Theatre participants were asked to complete a two-page written evaluation of their experience. Open-ended questions complimented a check box format to better understand participants’ experience and to generate learner responses. Participants [161/172] from eight CHW cancer education workshops and three community presentations completed a written evaluation. Evaluation results revealed 59 [95] of participants wrote detailed information describing what they learned, 90 [145] reported feeling more comfortable talking about CRC, and 77 [124] described healthy changes they planned to make including: getting screened [30], supporting others to get screened [34], sharing cancer information [35], being more physically active [42], eating healthier [34], and quitting tobacco [6]. Readers’ Theatre participation was associated with increased knowledge, comfort talking about CRC screenings, and it appeared to serve as a catalyst for positive intent to change behavior. To learn more about Readers Theatre: Cueva, M., Dignan, M., & Kuhnley, R. [2012] Readers’ Theatre: A Communication Tool for Colorectal Cancer Screening. Journal of Cancer Education. 27 [2] 281-286. Healthy Wrangell Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=8CC593D8-E5CD-B68F-D2E8F87B06E4D423 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=8CC593D8-E5CD-B68F-D2E8F87B06E4D423& Tue, 05 Feb 2013 09:32:13 GMT Healthy Wrangell Program Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium Project Overview Wrangell is a small island community in Southeast Alaska. The Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium [SEARHC] received funding from the Indian Health Service Health Promotion/Disease Prevention in order to “enhance and maintain protective factors and reduce risk factors against cancer, cardiovascular disease, and obesity in Wrangell, Alaska.” This program is aimed at all residents. Achieving these goals was organized around three objectives: 1] Increase the amount of fruits and vegetables consumed by Wrangell residents by 5 percent in 2011 and an additional 5 percent in 2012. 2]Encourage the adoption of clean indoor air policies by at least 50 individuals and 3 businesses. 3] Increase the amount of physical activity performed by residents by 10 percent by July 31, 2012. Program/Activities SEARHC helped form the Wrangell Community Garden, which allowed for the provision of local produce. A Hiking and Harvest program was developed to educate residents in local edible plants and berries. The Wrangell Schools have started to adopt a new menu for their meals that emphasizes low-sugar, low-fat, and low-sodium foods made from scratch. A fruit tree orchard was also planted at the Wrangell Elementary School. SEARHC staff worked to inform the community and disseminate information on smoke-free initiatives to residents and businesses. SEARHC also created geo-caching and traditional canoe clubs as well as encouraged greater aquatic fitness offerings in local pools. SEARHC has formed collaborations with the Healthy Wrangell Coalition in order to bring stakeholders together and define activities that would be sustainable and appropriate for the community. They also partnered with the Wrangell School District for nutrition and tobacco initiatives in the schools. SEARHC measured the success of this grant in terms of direct and indirect results. Direct results included success in implementing new initiatives and the number of pledge/commitment forms received from residents and businesses. Indirect results were obtained from a core measure survey that was conducted in 2010 and 2012. This survey allowed for comparison between the community in the first year of the grant period and the community at the end of the grant period. This survey had 164 adult respondents and 18 youth respondents in 2010. In 2012, there were 211 adult respondents and 24 youth respondents. This survey was used to assess the Wrangell community’s perceptions and practices related to tobacco use, alcohol, nutrition, and physical activity. The results of this survey were used to provide indirect results of the grant such as a decrease in physical activity, an increase in the number of people attempting to quit smoking, and an increase in the consumption of fruits and vegetables.Program/Activity Outcome There was a slight increase in the amount of fruits and vegetables eaten by adult residents of Wrangell. For children, there was an increase in the amount of fruits and vegetables eaten and a decrease in the average weight of survey respondents by five pounds. Overall it was estimated that fruit and vegetable consumption increased by at least five percent. Three businesses agreed to go smoke free and 30 residents pledged to follow smoke-free policies for their homes or cars. Smoke-free workplace signage was place in 25 Wrangell businesses. In the survey of residents, there was an increase in the number of people attempting to quit smoking [1.3 in 2010 to 3.1 in 2012] as well as a decrease in the number of people smoking “everyday” [7 decrease] or “some days” [4.7 decrease]. In the survey of residents, respondents reported an increase in the number of minutes per day they engaged in physical activity. However, other indicators of physical activity decreased. The Wrangell Community Garden, Hiking and Harvest program, fruit tree orchard, and changes to Wrangell Schools’ menus are all either self- or community-sustainable and expected to continue well past the end of this grant.SEARHC has staff that will continue to promote healthy living initiatives in Wrangell. Reducing Tobacco Use in Pregnancy in YK Delta Women http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=BD5AEA1A-F153-F058-D32AB09234E8EB04 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=BD5AEA1A-F153-F058-D32AB09234E8EB04& Thu, 31 Jan 2013 16:43:13 GMT From August 2009 through July 2012, using a culturally relevant education intervention, the Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation [YKHC] focused on increasing awareness of the harmful effects of tobacco on personal and fetal health in order to reduce the prevalence of tobacco use among pregnant Alaska Native women in the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta. In 2007, the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services [ADHSS] reported that 46 percent of Alaska Natives in Southwestern Alaska were tobacco users compared to 42 percent statewide. ADHSS also reported at that time that 20 percent of pregnant Alaska Native women in the region smoked cigarettes compared to 28 percent statewide, but that relationship inverts when looking at smokeless tobacco usage with 47 percent of pregnant Alaska Native women in the region using compared to just 18 percent statewide.2 The overarching goal of the YKHC project was to reduce the prevalence of any tobacco use in the last three months of pregnancy among Alaska Native women to less than 30 percent in three years.Program activities included communications through the development and distribution of culturally appropriate direct mail to all pregnant women living in the region, anti-tobacco literature from other organizations placed in clinics and hospital, anti-tobacco posters placed in 58 area high schools using slogans developed for teens by teens, and posters displayed in local newspapers promoting tobacco abstinence among local women and teens. Two new radio ads were created each month using local personalities and produced in Yup’ik and English airing twice daily on the local radio station. Women were also presented information on the risks of tobacco use during group classes. Resources were shared with health care providers to facilitate screening for tobacco use and for making referrals to tobacco cessation counseling. Referrals to counseling and nicotine replacement therapy offered through the hospital were also made by the program counselor. Data were collected using anonymous surveys of pregnant women staying in the pre-maternal home and by surveying a sample of pregnant Alaska Native women who did not stay at the pre-maternal home. Program/Activity Outcome The program almost reached its goal of reducing tobacco use among pregnant Alaska Native women to less than 30 percent. By the end of the third year, the program saw that rate reduced from 47 percent to 32 percent. In addition, the program achieved the following outcomes: Reducing Tobacco Use in Pregnancy in YK Delta Women. Through the surveys conducted, YKHC found that more than 90 percent of women in the Delta were aware of the harmful effects of tobacco use. The program increased the percentage of pregnant women who receive cessation counseling from 10 percent in the first year to 21 percent by the end of the third year. The surveys conducted also allowed program staff to measure the extent of their marketing efforts by asking pregnant women about their exposure to fliers, posters, and radio ads. The results of the program also indicate that partnerships with other organizations in the community improved the conditions for success, and leveraging existing programs proved an effective approach Indian Health Care Resource Center of Tulsa American Indian Pre-Diabetes and Obesity HPDP http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=CE5C96E3-C809-F8EB-484F338B39E0346C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=CE5C96E3-C809-F8EB-484F338B39E0346C& Wed, 30 Jan 2013 14:35:57 GMT Background: The Indian Health Care Resource Center [IHCRC] American Indian Pre-Diabetes and Obesity HPDP project identified, engaged, assessed and assisted American Indian children, youth and adults at risk of cardiovascular disease or diabetes in a voluntary effort to lead a healthier lifestyle. The project provided diabetes prevention interventions for participants living in or near the City of Tulsa, the geographic core of the service population of IHCRC. Tulsa is located on the traditional lands of the Cherokee, Muscogee Creek and Osage tribes in northeastern Oklahoma. Tulsa County is the second largest metropolitan statistical area [MSA] in the state containing 16.3 of the state’s total population. Oklahoma is home to 39 federally recognized tribal governments. Oklahoma’s Indian population is located in both the urban and rural areas of the state. According to Census data, 273,230 American Indians reside in Oklahoma with 20.4 of those in the Tulsa MSA. As of July 1, 2009 IHCRC served an active patient base of 16,073 individuals. Strategies: The goals of our project included improvement of participants’ health, fitness and quality of life. Specifically, our objectives were to increase fruit and vegetable consumption, decrease consumption of sugary beverages, increase physical activity and increase the number of visits that included educational counseling. Individual counseling session with a registered dietitian [RD] was the primary activity used to accomplish these objectives. The intervention included using a patient-centered motivational interviewing [MI] method in which the RD functions more as a guide than as a teacher. Throughout the MI process the patient decides whether he wants to make a change and what he wants to change, and then sets his own goal[s]. In addition to individual counseling sessions, our activities included facilitation of group classes for both IHCRC clients and employees. Evaluation Methods: To measure our outcomes we developed a nutrition and activity habits survey to measure our participants’ frequency of food choices, meal patterns, physical activity and leisure activity. Our participants periodically completed the survey during the program intervention. We designed the survey as a means to collect the data necessary to measure behavior change outcomes and used this form without modifications throughout the three years of the project. Changing the survey to simplify its content and/or design or replacing the written survey with a participant interview are examples of two programmatic changes we had considered making. We often observed differences in how a participant answered a question on the written survey versus how he or she answered the same question verbally in the counseling session. Results: Our objective to enroll at least 150 IHCRC child, adolescent, and adult clients in nutrition and physical activity counseling annually was met in years 1 and 2 of the project and was exceeded by more than 200 in year 3. We saw an increase in the number of visits that included education related to diet and nutrition and an increase in the number of participants in group health activities. We also saw a decrease in the number of participants consuming more than two weekly servings of beverages with added sugar and an increase in the number of participants who participated in physical activity. However, based on the survey results, we saw a decrease in the number of participants who consumed two daily servings of fruits and three daily servings of vegetables Sustainability: The need for continuation of a diabetes prevention program and screening for prediabetes was established with a CQI study conducted in year 3 of this project. As a result of data collected from this study, a prediabetes care coordinator position was created to improve patient care by early detection of elevated glucose so it can be treated and education can be provided to assist patients in making lifestyle changes. This position is responsible for coordination of care and resources for patients with prediabetes. Fred LeRoy Health & Wellness Centers Annual Health Fair http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=7897F1B8-B43A-5D79-C3D6B79AA2C7D333 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=7897F1B8-B43A-5D79-C3D6B79AA2C7D333& Tue, 30 Oct 2012 11:23:52 GMT The Fred LeRoy Health & Wellness Center’s Annual Health Fair: A Community Gathering” continued to expand this past year with representation from the private sector and Ponca Tribe of Nebraska and included, WIC, Poison Control, Domestic Violence, ICWA, Healthy Hearts, Diabetes program, Hepatitis A and B educational booth, Pharmacy, Dental, Colon and Prostate Cancer, Rollin Colon, Nebraska AIDS Project, CHS, PTN Enrollment and Cultural Department, Behavioral Health, Youth Services, Maternal Child Health/Midwifery Services, Northern Ponca Housing Authority, Environmental Protection Services, Energy Conservation, Job Empowerment, Creighton-Portion Control Education, Click-it don’t Risk-It, PEDCO, PTN Social Services and CHR. Other than the booths, children were entertained with Clowns, Face painting, Carnival Games, Indian jewelry and crafts, the Big Bouncer, to name a few. Approximately 300 people attended this year’s event. Not only was CHIPRA, a CMS-funded grant awarded to the Ponca Tribe to enroll children in the Medicaid program, able to increase their enrollment numbers , but the community gathering also allowed for more partnerships to be developed. Increasing partnerships is one of the PTN Health program strategic goals. Implementation of E.D.R. & E.H.R., http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=69A0EFF0-FCA7-AB4E-3B22F222CA2019A3 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=69A0EFF0-FCA7-AB4E-3B22F222CA2019A3& Tue, 30 Oct 2012 11:22:46 GMT The initial step for implantation of Dentrix and Dexis was the development and writing of a Request for Proposal [RFP]. The proposal included an executive summary, needs statement, review of program options, cost benefit analysis, hardware requirements, staffing needs, training requirements, support needs and next steps. This was discussed and reviewed by the Tribal Council. Once approved, the implementation process was put in place. Working with I.H.S. Dentrix implementation staff, they were able to get their system in place with little negative impact on schedules and patient care. Being interfaced with RPMS, it also allows us to get information entered into Dentrix, over to RPMS for reporting purposes as well as E.H.R. Having dental information in E.H.R. allows the whole clinical community, both medical and Dental, to get a much more comprehensive level of understanding as to what is going on with the patient, including kept and un-kept appointments, medication, problems, etc. Outstanding Leadership Directly Impacting the Community http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=6B819097-D7B6-26E5-FBE4AAD461183DC2 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=6B819097-D7B6-26E5-FBE4AAD461183DC2& Tue, 30 Oct 2012 11:22:14 GMT The first step was to change the clinic from one that was more of an emergency clinic to a general dentistry facility. This entailed education the patients on their oral health issues, how to improve, and the value of getting their treatment completed. In the past, the staff would see primarily short duration emergency procedures and then would have had significant amounts of lag time. Now the staff had to step up and see additional restorative patients. The quality of care needed to be improved. The staff’s mindset was a major issue that had to be overcome. Currently they enjoy having staff who are patient orientated who buy into the mission. Also, as they continued to increase services, so additional staff had to be hired and trained. This was a gradual process as the new hires needed role models-things worked out we. In addition, facility issues were present. The supply room was cleaned out, catalogued, and an ordering system implemented. This helped to reduce costs. The equipment had been neglected so it was either repaired or replaced. The clinic was pained and new flooring placed. Now the patients feel the respect that they deserve by having treatment areas that are greatly improved. Other improvements included obtaining, implementing, and utilizing the Electronic Dental Records [EDR] and digital radiographs. Since PTN does not have a defined reservation per se, transportation of patients to the dental clinic from different service areas was arranged and patients were scheduled at specific times. A “Dental Camp for Youth” was held in the dental clinic. Young people were educated first by a slide presentation, that they participated in a hands on program where they placed sealants on models, and used a hand piece to “drill and fill” cavities on models. They finished up by taking impressions and creating their own sports mouth guards. This broke down barriers and they were now some of the facilities best patients. In order to increase Native American presence in the dental field a “Ponca Dental Office Trainee” position was created and filled. This person is learning to be a dental assistance with the encouragement to go further in the field if she so desires. The dental staff has embraced this opportunity to teach someone about their profession. Staff meetings are geared towards educating the staff in the many facets of dentistry- the more they are educated the more that they feel confident to participate in patient care/education. Implementation of E.D.R. & E.H.R. http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=6B599633-07E1-CA1D-38482D83905EE9EA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=6B599633-07E1-CA1D-38482D83905EE9EA& Tue, 30 Oct 2012 11:18:47 GMT The initial step for implantation of Dentrix and Dexis was the development and writing of a Request for Proposal [RFP]. The proposal included an executive summary, needs statement, review of program options, cost benefit analysis, hardware requirements, staffing needs, training requirements, support needs and next steps. This was discussed and reviewed by the Tribal Council. Once approved, the implementation process was put in place. Working with I.H.S. Dentrix implementation staff, they were able to get their system in place with little negative impact on schedules and patient care. Being interfaced with RPMS, it also allows us to get information entered into Dentrix, over to RPMS for reporting purposes as well as E.H.R. Having dental information in E.H.R. allows the whole clinical community, both medical and Dental, to get a much more comprehensive level of understanding as to what is going on with the patient, including kept and un-kept appointments, medication, problems, etc. Learning through Volunteering http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=8FC3CFEE-E0AA-F82E-17A58DCBAAD65727 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=8FC3CFEE-E0AA-F82E-17A58DCBAAD65727& Mon, 01 Oct 2012 07:05:25 GMT The community event Feed My Starving Children was a one day event to encourage patients to increase physical activity and review portion sizes necessary to sustain health. The day of the event patients participated in a one hour discussion to review the dietary recommendations for diabetes and to discuss the benefits of volunteering on mental and physical health. Patients shared their experiences from past volunteering. After this discussion a healthy lunch was served and patients were brought to a packing facility to pack dried food for children around the world. This effort lasted 1.5 hours. During that time patients interacted with one another, were actively packing and learned [with looks of amazement] the small amount of food that the body needs. After the event patients reported increased consciousness of portion sizes at meals. One patient stated that her grandchildren had finally stopped wasting food and only took what they were going to eat at meals! Patients have also requested additional opportunities to volunteer their time and skills. We plan to follow up on this request. Annual August Diabetes Event aka Diabetes Community Event http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=5A7FE7EF-AFAE-525B-80E8451D37361973 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=5A7FE7EF-AFAE-525B-80E8451D37361973& Thu, 20 Sep 2012 12:22:53 GMT For the last 14 years, a collaborative planning committee of the Oneida Community Health Center has planned and implemented an annual event held in August. The event focuses on diabetes awareness and mobilizing the community to take action to fight diabetes. Currently, the event sells out at 450 participants affected by diabetes. The event includes edcuational booths, community panelist discussion, and main speaker. Each year the event has a theme, in which all the educational booths, community panel, and main speaker focus on. For example, in 2012 the event theme was "Preserving the Family Tree." There was a photo booth to take family pictures, tree centerpieces that were given away, the panelist including an 18 y.o, 35, y.o, and 70 y.o [discussed the generational differences of their diabetes journey]. The purpose of event to is to allow for large group education and community mobilization. For more information, including budget breakdown, planning, implementation, promotion, please contact Margaret or Betty. Physical Activity Kit [PAK] Rosebud Trainers http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=40E0B09F-B597-55EA-0A4AA701BC53A734 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=40E0B09F-B597-55EA-0A4AA701BC53A734& Thu, 19 Jul 2012 14:32:55 GMT The Physical Activity Kit [PAK] Staying on the Active Path in native Communities… a Lifespan Approach strategy refines an effective method to package, implement, evaluate, and disseminate culturally appropriate physical activity for American Indian/Alaskan Native and other communities. The primary goal of the PAK is to increase the time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity [MVPA] by promoting age and culturally appropriate physical activity across the life span of Native American communities. These physical activities are appropriate across age spans [Young People, Adults/Family, and Older Adults] and include various levels of activity: Warm-up [flexibility], Cardiovascular, Strength, Cool-down [flexibility]. Collaboration with City Market http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4CFAFDC2-BF95-C9CC-F1332CC8DC98D74E http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4CFAFDC2-BF95-C9CC-F1332CC8DC98D74E& Mon, 13 Feb 2012 14:47:51 GMT Our Ti Youth Healthy Weight team is collaborating with the local food store, City Market. We send team members to the store to: do food demonstrations for customers of healthy meals give out recipes for fast, easy HEALTHY meals help customers learn the new Nu-Val nutrition rating system encourage customers to make healthier food choices by using the Nu-Val system encourage employees with health education, screening, motivational interviewing techniques We also are making a TV presentation on the in-house channel about the Nu-Val system, and we have made posters to use at City Market that encourage eating healthy meals at home, and promote our collaboration with City Market. More plans to come, also! "Get Fit" Challenge http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=175AC8E3-AA6B-31E3-BBFD584EFE94BB02 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=175AC8E3-AA6B-31E3-BBFD584EFE94BB02& Mon, 13 Feb 2012 14:46:46 GMT The “Get Fit” Challenge is a 16-week program designed to initiate positive, healthy lifestyle changes among adults to prevent diabetes, reduce obesity, and increase physical activity behaviors. The “Get Fit” activities include short and long-distance running training tips, health seminars [ex. proper running shoes/attire, race day foods, keeping motivated], healthy cooking demonstrations, safe weight loss activities, nutrition education, support and encouragement. This program also provides an opportunity for participants to train, as a group, for local marathon events. The physical activity specialist oversees the program, arranges for seminar guest speakers, and schedules the group fitness activities. Over the course of the program, participants develop a strong camaraderie and serve as a support system for each other. Workplace Wellness http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=72B2F40D-98CF-9416-243F30088F20DF6F http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=72B2F40D-98CF-9416-243F30088F20DF6F& Mon, 13 Feb 2012 14:45:43 GMT The Chinle Service Unit [CSU] - Workplace Wellness is designed to support employees to become phsyically active during their normal working hours. The CSU supports an active lifestyle amongst their employees which will improve work production and reduce absenteeism associated with illnesses. Since 1946, under Federal statue 5 U.S.C. 7901 Federal agencies have been authorized to establish, within the limitations of the appropriations available, employee health programs to promote and maintain the phsyical and mental fitness of employees. Social Media Engagement & Live Internet Streaming http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=B590C239-CCB4-E465-26B84DA422C452A5 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=B590C239-CCB4-E465-26B84DA422C452A5& Thu, 09 Feb 2012 08:59:14 GMT American Indian Health & Family Services recently held a social celebration in honor of the winter solstice with family, food, arts, & music. In order to increase awareness of services and general community outreach, we’ve incorporated social media into our efforts. Since the solstice generally has a huge turn out with the community, we posted links to our social media websites & live streamed the event with a stationary camera detailing the event visually through internet technologies for those who could not make it or were distanced. It also encouraged interaction with our social media tools using facebook, twitter, and Ustream for the live feed. A projector was used to display the links to our social media websites & the agency website. Live updates about the event were posted from Ustream. We linked the social media websites so one update from Ustream within the interface was able to connect to twitter & facebook providing one swift post instead of multiple updates from each interface. Some staff & community members helped with photos and posted them with links, tags, & mentions commenting on the event live as we went through out the event. The presentation provided information creatively & provoked the community and the agency to strengthen promotion of health services, cultural way of life, and our collective stories as a community. For the technical setup, all the audio from the music performances & general MCing of the event ran into a mixer that supplemented the audio for the live internet stream. One stationary camera was fixed to focus on the people & and then adjusted to the stage when performances were happening. A projector synced with a laptop to post digital visual banners was used to promote the social media site, community engagement, and awareness of the agency’s website. There was also a wireless internet connection with high bandwidth that was used for the live stream connection along with an HD camera & portable field recorder for audio to grab external footage & sound to archive our stories as native people. Running Wolf Fitness Center http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=ABEE2D89-C0F8-EA47-983FB2ABF1DDEF6E http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=ABEE2D89-C0F8-EA47-983FB2ABF1DDEF6E& Mon, 06 Feb 2012 08:56:11 GMT Running Wolf Fitness Center is a joint endeavor between the Indian Health Board of Minneapolis and the Native American Community Clinic. Running Wolf Fitness Center’s mission is to make exercise the norm for the urban Native American community. Running Wolf Fitness Center provides a safe place for urban Native Americans to exercise. It is goal of Running Wolf Fitness Center to increase the community’s participation in exercise and healthy eating. These activities will aid in promoting a healthier lifestyle and thus play a role in decreasing the health disparities that plague the urban Native American Community. Running Wolf Fitness center is conveniently located between the Indian Health Board of Minneapolis and the Native American Community Clinic. Running Wolf Fitness Center has cardiovascular equipment available for use that includes treadmills, elliptical machines, stationary bikes, stair steppers, and a Nu Step. Likewise, there is a variety of weight machines and free weights offered at Running Wolf Fitness Center. There is a large studio which hosts a variety of different fitness classes on most days of the week located within Running Wolf Fitness Center. Running Wolf Fitness Center is funded by the Indian Health Board of Minneapolis and the Native American Community Clinic. Likewise, both clinics received funding from UCare and a generous donation from the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community to aid in the renovations of the current location and the operational costs of the facility. The partnering clinics are looking for ways to sustain Running Wolf Fitness Center. Originally, the fitness center has been free to the community. A business plan has been developed to charge a membership fee of $10/month starting in April 2012. The Indian Health Board of Minneapolis will continue to offer this service free of charge to patients that are active participants of the SDPI Diabetes Programs[Community Directed and DP Initiative]. Crownpoint Teen Court http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4632131E-A3F6-DABB-ED72ACF40C312AD6 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4632131E-A3F6-DABB-ED72ACF40C312AD6& Mon, 09 Jan 2012 16:37:22 GMT Crownpoint Teen Court is the only community-run, Native American youth court program in the Navajo Nation. Teen Court is a real justice program run by teens for teens. Juvenile’s aged 12 through 17 who have committed a misdemeanor crime appear before a jury of their peers. Teen Court is offered as a positive experience to divert a first time teen offender away from a pattern of criminal behavior. Cases heard in Teen Court involve crimes such as shoplifting, truancy, disorderly conduct, destruction of property and possession of alcohol or marijuana possession. In Teen Court, volunteer teens perform the roles of the prosecuting and defense attorneys, bailiff, clerk and jury. The Judge is the only adult directly involved in the court proceedings. By bringing the teens before a jury of their peers, which sentences them to constructive service in a community service organization and jury duty, this program seeks to deter teens from future unlawful behavior, while providing direct experience in the judiciary system and an understanding of their future role as a productive citizen. Benefits of the Program: Provides a cost-saving alternative to District Court [average cost of operating a teen court is $32,822] As it involves the entire community, Teen Court increases public appreciation of the legal systems and enhances community/court relationships, encouraging greater respect for the law among youth and promoting volunteerism among adults and youth. Youth receive hope for the future, connection with their elders, their culture-based community service partners and others, knowing they are an integral part of the community. Since the inception in December 2001, the program reports an impressive 94 percent success rate with only 6 percent of the 1,078 youth having re-offended. Coordinated Approach To Child Health [CATCH] http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=0C8FC328-D69B-CF87-DE85ED10BAF90E16 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=0C8FC328-D69B-CF87-DE85ED10BAF90E16& Tue, 27 Dec 2011 15:04:17 GMT Coordinated Approach To Child Health [CATCH] and is an evidence-based, coordinated school health program designed to promote physical activity, healthy food choices and the prevention of tobacco use in children. The CATCH Programs cover kids from preschool through 8th grade and has been implemented in thousands of schools and after-school organizations across America and Canada. By teaching children that eating healthy and being physically active every day can be FUN, the CATCH Program has proven that establishing healthy habits in childhood can promote behavior changes that can last a lifetime. Over 20 years of research and development have made CATCH a model program – replicated in over 8,500 schools and communities. State and County Health Departments across the country are using CATCH to make a lasting impact on the health of children and their families. CATCH is an evidence-based, National Institutes of Health [NIH]-funded program proven to increase physical activity, improve student nutrition habits, reduce sodium and saturated fats in school lunches, sustain student health behaviors at least three years post intervention, and decrease obesity rates. Healthy Lifestyle Advocate Facebook Page, Lac Courte Oreilles Community Health Center http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=0B3EAA7C-FF22-E785-26ADF0C5EA607104 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=0B3EAA7C-FF22-E785-26ADF0C5EA607104& Tue, 13 Dec 2011 08:09:54 GMT Description: LCO Community Health Center Healthy Lifestyle Advocate Facebook Page. We started the Healthy Lifestyle Advocate Facebook page to connect with all those who like to learn on line. Our goal in using Facebook include connecting our LCO program with individuals, families and communities in the local area along with others outside of the area who need encouragement and ideas for healthy behavior changes. The LCO Facebook page is an open venue for anyone to share ideas and to give us feedback for our program. The site is designed to: • Post Healthy Lifestyle ideas • Post opportunities for Physical Activity and exercise groups • Share healthy recipes [hints for making small changes that last] • Support networking collaborations. The target group for our LCO activities originally was ages 15-30, but we really have had just as many in the age group of 30 and above. One major challenge of using a Facebook page is the limitation that work site organizations are placing on access. Facebook is excellent for pictures, and for presenting information in an informal and creative way. Hopefully, Face book will be a catalyst for helping individuals connect with others, and developing support groups for people working on the similar health behavioral changes. At present, we are working with a group that is starting a steps program with pedometers, and with another group who will be starting Yoga classes. It is our vision that participant experiences and stories will be placed on the LCO Face book page, thus becoming an active site for raising awareness and promotion for Health Ideas and Health Education efforts using social media and technology. SANE Project http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=A015F6A8-F5F2-4654-CA125C8F3B2448B2 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=A015F6A8-F5F2-4654-CA125C8F3B2448B2& Tue, 13 Dec 2011 08:03:13 GMT The Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner [SANE] program is the first SANE group started in the Aberdeen Area. The project goal is to serve women and men who have been sexual assaulted. The team conducts the exams locally rather than transferring individuals 60 miles away to other hospitals. Desert Visions Youth Wellness Center http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=20BC1867-D5B0-0F7B-7D60D7F42DBAF3DA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=20BC1867-D5B0-0F7B-7D60D7F42DBAF3DA& Tue, 13 Dec 2011 08:01:27 GMT Desert Visions is a 24-bed residential drug & alcohol treatment center for Native American adolescents between the ages of 12-18 years old. We have co-ed, open enrollment with the average length of stay 120 days. Our treatment program is based on a biopsychosocial model, with a medical component. Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians Annual Jiimaan Journey http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4A8461FB-B52E-FA26-73B582C37E5D268C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4A8461FB-B52E-FA26-73B582C37E5D268C& Fri, 07 Oct 2011 15:21:48 GMT The Annual Jiimaan Journey is a renewal of an old Odawa tradition. Our ancestors would load up their jiimaanuk, or canoes, with trade goods and travel up the Inland Waterway and out to the Great Lakes where they would travel around and trade for other goods necessary to survive. Since 2008 we have taken our youth ages 12 to 18 on a 45 mile journey over 5 days along this ancient route. We travel from Little Traverse Bay on the shores of Lake Michigan along a chain of lakes out to Lake Huron on Michigans east coast, camping as we go. Along the way they listen to stories of local sites, such as where old villages were and what families lived there to where there are battle sites or graveyards, take part in traditional crafts and games and learn about healthier habits. They also draw together and learn to work as a team, and learn that they are capable of much more than they think they are, giving them increased self respect and feelings of accomplishment. The LTBB Community Health Department partners with the tribal Youth Services department as well as the Language/Cultural Preservation department, the Elders department, the Substance Abuse Department, the Natural Resoources Department and community volunteers to create a stimulating and unforgettable event. Typically we average around 20 to 28 youth each year. First Steps to Fitness http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4A86337D-BF8C-6D12-559AFD4ECF9A5813 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4A86337D-BF8C-6D12-559AFD4ECF9A5813& Fri, 07 Oct 2011 15:13:35 GMT A grant administered through Bayfield County Recreation Center is targeting outreach to Red Cliff Community Health Center patients in need of a fitness regimen to address health issues. This will be done through referrals to the First Steps to Fitness Program from Red Cliff Health Center Providers. The program provides at least three training sessions with a Personal Trainer and the first month membership fee free of charge. These sessions will include a simple physical assessment, help participant create an exercise regimen that can be done at the Recreation Center or in their community/home, and follow up to see if their exercise program needs any adjustments or if further education is required. There will also be follow up through Red Cliff Health Center for improvement in general health measured by before and after weight, patient report, and maintenance of membership at Bayfield Recreation Center. Diabetes Mini Clinics http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4A83D561-D385-E6A1-E08820EF6CA62A84 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4A83D561-D385-E6A1-E08820EF6CA62A84& Fri, 07 Oct 2011 15:03:50 GMT Since January of 2009 the Peter Christensen Diabetes Management Program has been providing mini clinic appointments for patients, on the diabetes registry according to the patients birth month. Mini clinics are held on the 1st Thursday of every other month from 8:30-11:00 AM , and 1:00-3:00 PM. Staff includes: administrative assistant, Registered Dietitian, Certified Diabetes Educator [RD, CDE], Registered Nurse, Certified Diabetes Educator [RN, CDE], Nurse tobacco cessation specialist, optical and dental. Two weeks prior to the appointment the patients chart is reviewed, and health tab is updated [to determine what health indicators, such as labs or optical are needed], letters are sent to all patients whose birthday is the current month or the month before or after [Aug/Sept, Oct/Nov, Dec./ Jan, etc]inviting them to participate and when their appointment time is. Patients are encouraged to call if the appointment time does not work and they will be scheduled at another time during the day or on another day with one of the CDEs. Transportation is also available through contract health if that is a barrier for the patient. When a patient arrives for their appointment [1] they check in with the administrative person who gives them forms to complete that include a health history, physical activity assessment and depression screen][2] the patient is seen by the RD, CDE who takes height, weight and calculates Body Mass Index [BMI] and reviews the patients usual intake and answers and nutrition questions the patient may have, if the patient is due [on their health tab] for optical they will go to optical to be seen, or schedule and appointment, next they will see the RN, CDE who takes further vitals [Blood Pressure, pulse, etc], provides patient with a new meter if they need one, and demonstrates use, patient will then see the Nurse who will provide smoking cessation education if requested and immunizations, as needed, next the patient will see the dental hygienist who will educate the patient on dental health and schedule an appointment with the dentist, if needed, next the patient will see the podiatry nurse who will do a complete foot exam. Patient will then check out with the RD, CDE, the patients health tab will be updated, and any needed appointments such as with their primary care provider will be scheduled. The total time for a patient to go through all stations is approximatelly 1-2 hours. Weight for Wellness http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4A84D36F-FF7F-372D-230E969EE47E9049 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4A84D36F-FF7F-372D-230E969EE47E9049& Fri, 07 Oct 2011 14:57:40 GMT Weight for Wellness is a weekly class held at noon in the Behavioral Health department for adults who want to attain a healthy weight. A healthy lunch is prepared by the dietitian with recipes given out to participants. Carb counting is discussed for diabetics, as well as other dietary guidelines on the meal. The counselor oversees the session with the participants and discusses emotional eating factors. Many facets of overeating are discussed. Workbooks are used with homework assignments given out before the next session. Visualization, positive self-talk, and other tools are used. Participants also rely on each other during the week to overcome any hurdles and check-in with each other. Physical activity is also discussed and highly encouraged outside of the session. Lets Talk Trash: http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=2AAE5675-BCE8-22DB-1598D931ADE0BBFA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=2AAE5675-BCE8-22DB-1598D931ADE0BBFA& Wed, 07 Sep 2011 17:02:29 GMT During 2008 and 2009 the Let’s Talk Trash campaign has taken the initiative to raise awareness and take action on the revolving trash issue and the annual Navajo Nation Fair festivities. Each year the Let’s Talk Trash team holds a planning meeting in preparation to tackle common trash problems during the NN Fair Parade. In the previous years, which trash pick-up during the Fair Parade was conducted, two reports have been produced to highlight successes and challenges of a huge undertaking, including the comparison of compensating or not compensating volunteers. The 2008 year report shows a successful outcome utilizing paid volunteers, whereas, in 2009 volunteers made up most of the help, despite a short timeframe for preparation planning and limited resources with equipment and supplies. This projects aims for sustainability and sets an example for other communities to take action against littering problems within their respective communities. ANTHC Early Intervention Services http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=5F25B44F-DB6A-508F-426E6D24B54CB634 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=5F25B44F-DB6A-508F-426E6D24B54CB634& Tue, 05 Jul 2011 10:03:51 GMT Early Intervention Services [EIS] provides continuum of primary care to HIV/AIDS patients counseling, testing, referral HIV/AIDS awareness medical evaluation/provider consults and clinical care other primary care services facilitated referrals and partnership with other health care services. EIS coordinates services with regional sites in Bethel, Fairbanks, Juneau and Sitka. EIS regional [or Hub] site coordinators provide case management and coordination of primary care services to clients living in rural areas. Northwest AIDS Education and Training Center [AETC] and collaboration with ANTHC-EIS provide statewide training for tribal/non-tribal clinicians and other providers associated with HIV medical care and treatment. HIV perceptorships and technical assistance are available at no cost to qualified providers. SDPI Diabetes Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=9FC92376-B65C-A174-9E1246C2641A4473 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=9FC92376-B65C-A174-9E1246C2641A4473& Tue, 05 Jul 2011 09:59:18 GMT The project began by participants using the “Walk Away the Pounds” 1 mile video and worked up to 3 miles within the 12 weeks. The group that started this wanted more, so they lengthened their walking routine to the 4 mile video. The walks were so successful that the next step of their exercise routine included adding a “Biggest Loser Sculpting” video which took us out to a total of 6 months. Julie’s exercise group then formed an indoor volleyball league to further expand their exercise program. This became so popular that more community members became involved resulting in expansion of the community league to the extent that volleyball is now being played 3 to 4 times a week by more community members. The entire community is benefiting. Using Community Balanced Scorecards to successfully implement a MAPP model for Health Improvement http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=6943A21F-CB13-7DC8-A589043A519942C1 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=6943A21F-CB13-7DC8-A589043A519942C1& Tue, 05 Jul 2011 09:56:48 GMT Get Up & Go is a local grassroots Health and Wellness Campaign that began in 2008 to help transform St. Clair County from its current status among the least healthiest counties in Illinois into one of the healthiest counties in the United States by the year 2020! In St. Clair County, achieving significant improvements in physical, behavioral and social health outcomes involves building strong collaborations within and beyond the membership of the Health Care Commission. That adds the challenges of getting multiple organizations to support a common strategy to achieve outcomes, managing the complexity of a collaborative strategy, and achieving accountability for results that require the efforts of many organizations. The InsightVision Community Balanced Scorecard [CBSC] and related tools such as strategy maps and community results compacts are expressly designed to meet these challenges In 2010, the member organizations of the Countys Health Care Commission began using these Community Balanced Scorecard tools to create strategy maps, scorecards and community compact agreements around the two themes of Healthy Eating and Active Living. These same scorecard building techniques and tools are now assisting the Commissions implementation of the MAPP Model [Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnership] with the help of over 32 county-based health and human service agencies as they develop a five-year community health plan to address four strategic issues: [1] Preventable risk factors affecting chronic diseases such as heart disease, obesity, diabetes and lung cancer [2] Maternal & Child health issues such as infant mortality, teen pregnancy and STD prevention [3] Behavioral Health issues such as Suicide and substance abuse and, [4] Safety issues such as domestic abuse and gang-related violence. The CBSC tools are currently being developed for these four areas to establish SMART based objectives, drive performance and track progress towards achieving the desired outcomes. How to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates in Practice http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4B6A1358-B3DA-0FC3-1780148DDACDBCB5 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=4B6A1358-B3DA-0FC3-1780148DDACDBCB5& Thu, 26 May 2011 14:10:30 GMT The goal of this guide is: 1] To inform clinicians and their office managers, who deliver primary care about their opportunity to prevent colorectal cancer with appropriate screening 2] to encourage primary care providers to decrease the mortality and morbidity of colorectal cancer [CRC] and other cancers through appropriate screening 3] to facilitate efforts of office-based clinicians to reduce disparities by applying screening guidelines on a universal basis to the age-appropriate population and 4] to improve preventive care in primary care practices through use of the strategies and tools presented in this guide. TRIAD Program or Taking Responsibility In Addressing Diabetes http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=24FAB538-F7BF-5466-6EB2D8354956FC4A http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=24FAB538-F7BF-5466-6EB2D8354956FC4A& Mon, 09 May 2011 16:23:55 GMT The TRIAD program stands for Taking Responsibility In Addressing Diabetes. The TRIAD program is a collaboration between the Oneida Community Health Center Diabetes Team/Medical Clinic [Physicians/Educators/Nurses], Health Promotion Department [Wellness Coaches], and Oneida Family Fitness Center [Fitness Specialists or Personal Trainers.] It is a 12 week exercise program where patients work individually or as a family with a personal trainer and wellness coach to increase physical activity, improve cardiometabolic health, and lost weight. Data is collected that includes pre/post fitness assessment [BMI, Waist to Hip Ratio, Aerobic Fitness, Strength, Flexibility, and Weight Loss], pre/post wellness/vision assessment, and pre/post hemoglobin A1C levels. For more information, including data trends, program development, internal/external processes, referral systems, database tracking, program evaluation, and promotion, please contact Margaret VanDen Heuvel at mvandenh@oneidanation.org or [920] 869-4941. Sacred Foods Equals Healthy Lives http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=A3418342-AC8B-28DA-9E65BB1B44B214B0 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=A3418342-AC8B-28DA-9E65BB1B44B214B0& Fri, 21 Jan 2011 12:17:47 GMT The project is a juxtaposition of Traditional Indigenous sacred foods with modern Western diet to identify at risk families, particularly women of child bearing age and children by using our Nutrition Screening Tool to assess total mercury exposure routes to the body, distribution of a educational curriculum, and replanting wild fruit, nuts and berries in both Tribal lands held in common and lands of individual Tribal members. Maternal Child Health Case Management Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=2159BC63-F8F6-1120-7E0C9B07C3F9FF86 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=2159BC63-F8F6-1120-7E0C9B07C3F9FF86& Wed, 19 Jan 2011 10:29:25 GMT Coordination of services for health care and health education in rural Wyoming and especially within the Wind River Service Unit area are difficult to maintain without a proper case management program in place. There is a need to assess and coordinate community and health care resources related to Maternal Child Health especially those that are vulnerable and designated as high risk to ensure families are receiving adequate services. This designation could include: first time mothers, premature infants, and adolescent prenatal patients, those prenatal patients with co-morbid factors that may adversely affect the pregnancy outcome and a history of substance use during pregnancy or history of substance abuse, or any problems associated with psychosocial issues. Utilizing a case management model would allow better utilization and coordination of services. At the present time we do not know the adequacy of the prenatal care received by those women who go elsewhere and especially if these women fall into a high risk category and need to be sent to a hospital for delivery that offers a higher level of care for the mother and infant. It is also recognized that when women receive their prenatal care elsewhere they also continue their care and that of their children with the other providers. In light of the fact that these women deliver in the hospitals that are not an IHS facility, there is not complete documentation from the delivering hospitals concerning labor, delivery, recovery postpartum period, and newborn services provided. There is a great need for an improved Maternal Child Health Case Management program provided by Public Health Nurses to promote advocacy,to provide education & support for the prenatal and postpartum patient and her family especially those that are categorized as high risk, and ensure a collaborative effort and coordination of services are made with the patient, Wind River Service Unit, private providers, and hospital providers which can only positively impact the outcome and family as well as the entire community. We have put in place the MCH Case Manager, a family friendly centered education room, education material, incentives and equipment needed for home visits, or visits to the patients at a place where the patient is more comfortable, and a prenatal registry has been developed in order to track data to measure adequacy of prenatal care, and coordination of services and outcomes. We are presently in the early stages of the program with baseline data. Physical Activity Kit [PAK] http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C196B140-EE3A-A322-44BCB0749EDE5C69 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C196B140-EE3A-A322-44BCB0749EDE5C69& Wed, 19 Jan 2011 10:23:28 GMT The prevalence of obesity and overweight has increased dramatically among American Indians and Alaska Native populations within the last 30 years. To address one of the modifiable risk factors that contribute to overweight and obesity, the Indian Health Service and the University of New Mexico, Prevention Research Center, partnered to increase opportunities for physical activity for all ages to develop the Physical Activity Kit [PAK] Staying on the Active Path in Native Communities… A Lifespan Approach that is designed to promote culturally appropriate physical activity for all ages through games, movement and dance. The kit contains fun and interactive physical activity breaks, modified American Indian games, and group activities for young people, adults/family and older adults and includes various levels of activity such as: strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular physical activities. The Kit was field-tested in eleven field site teams consisting of a broad range of disciplines. The feedback from the teams demonstrated that PAK was successful in promoting positive changes related to physical activity, was easy to implement, and it was fun and engaging. PAK was rolled out nationally in 2009, and over 450 individuals from across the Indian country have been trained to implement the Kit in the community, school, worksite, and elderly programs to encourage individuals of all ages to adopt an active lifestyle. The Coming of the Blessing - A Pathway to a Healthy Pregnancy http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=9E279DF1-C5F2-8AC5-7DA9EED7E753815A http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=9E279DF1-C5F2-8AC5-7DA9EED7E753815A& Wed, 05 Jan 2011 17:26:22 GMT The American Indian/Alaska Native Women’s Committee of the March of Dimes West Region created a comprehensive perinatal health education booklet called The Coming of the Blessing® to honor the native cultural beliefs and traditions that impact pregnancy and child-bearing. The booklet was pilot tested in 14 states in 2008 with feedback collected from healthcare providers and families. To date, we have heard from more than 181 women. The booklet helped them change eating habits, exercise appropriately, reduce stress, decide to breastfeed and start taking a multi-vitamin. • Overall, only 69 of American Indians and Alaska Natives receive early prenatal care. By comparison, nearly 90 of women participating in The Coming of the Blessing® kept all their prenatal appointments and 76 started prenatal care in the 1st trimester. • The preterm birth rate for American Indians and Alaska Natives is 14.6 but for women participating in The Coming of the Blessing®, that rate has been reduced to 7. Some comments written by the women include: “Helpful information for my life.” “Values my traditional heritage.” “Let’s you know about our ancestors.”, “Great information for Natives by Natives.” Because of the overwhelming positive response, the booklet is now available in every state through the March of Dimes Fulfillment Center. The Shawl Circle http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=EECE0426-A548-903E-A06406B22A890EE6 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=EECE0426-A548-903E-A06406B22A890EE6& Wed, 05 Jan 2011 17:23:48 GMT The Shawl Circle- Hokvke Yekce [Creek for “strong women”] is a new collaborative effort between the Florida Department of Health, Bureau of HIV/AIDS and The Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program. Respectful of our American Indian communities sovereignty and understanding that department staff may be viewed with fear and distrust when taking educational and preventive messages to the community, the project brought together respected women from the tribes, bands and/or clans in Florida, provided them with the education and materials and let them present the information in the correct cultural and traditional context for their community. As each woman completes the program, the bureau presents her with a specially-designed shawl. The shawl serves as a visual symbol of her commitment to keep herself healthy and strong. Hinnah Bitsos Society http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D6D8-DFE5-39DE-6B364EA50AF405F9 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D6D8-DFE5-39DE-6B364EA50AF405F9& Wed, 05 Jan 2011 17:17:32 GMT The Hinnah Bitsos Society [HBS or "Eagle Plume Society"]is an intensely structured 23.5 day inpatient and outpatient program. The curriculum runs 8:00 am to 4:30 pm with evening activities seven days a week. No visitations or outside contact are allowed Fort Defiance Indian Health Home Based Care Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153E3C-B0E4-9E65-80D237E9320A9FAB http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153E3C-B0E4-9E65-80D237E9320A9FAB& Wed, 05 Jan 2011 17:16:53 GMT The FDIH Home Based Care Program reports on their recent progress. It is a well organized and well staffed program that provides coordinated, interdisciplinary care for elders and their families. Case studies have been purposeful in that they have reminded us to open up to new possibilities, highlight key elements for elder care, i.e., care coordination, support for the family caregiver, importance of quality of life as perceived by the elder, etc. These case studies have an additional value in that they prompt the question “How do we ensure that every elder in our health system has access to the care they need?” Dr. Finke, who spent the last 10 years promoting the development of geriatric specific services in the IHS system, has come to understand that this is not the way to ensure reliably high quality care for every elder. The solution to ensuring reliably high quality care of elders is in ensuring reliably high quality care for everyone. The principles that drive good care of chronic conditions in patients of every age are the same as the principles of good elder care. The only reasonable way to reliably identify and address depression in every affected elder or to identify and support the vulnerable caregivers of elders with dementia is to systematically integrate behavioral health into primary care. This does not mean that improvements are not still needed. This is still a large task. Broadening our focus to look at the prevention and care of chronic conditions across all ages is where the solution lies to improve care of the elderly. Design features that support the delivery of care within relationships and across time, that really, truly support patient driven health care, and that allow providers to tailor the services provided to the care needed should be build into our primary care design. A health system that is designed to provide quality care, reliably, across the age span and across conditions will achieve reliably high quality care for our elders. We will all walk down the same road let’s build it together. The Gallup Indian Medical Center [GIMC] Hospital Lifestyle Balance [LSB] Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D805C4-0E9B-29DA-F4C91520DC0FFD9D http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D805C4-0E9B-29DA-F4C91520DC0FFD9D& Wed, 05 Jan 2011 17:00:42 GMT The Gallup Indian Medical Center [GIMC] Hospital Lifestyle Balance [LSB] Program branched out and was started at two Gallup Service Unit Schools. The Community LSB [CLBS] is a 20 week weight loss program that was taught by the Public Health Nutritionist Alvera Enote, RD and Recreation Specialist, Colleen Hoskie. Obesity and overweight is a major risk factor in the development of diabetes and other lifestyle related health problems. The Diabetes Prevention Program [DPP] showed that lifestyle changes effectively decreased the development of Type 2 diabetes therefore, the DPP 16-lesson core curriculum was used to implement the lifestyle intervention. Lessons involved ways to establish healthy eating habits, low calorie, and low fat meal planning and moderate physical activity, such as brisk walking. Implementing Tobacco Control into the Primary Healthcare Setting http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=5BE56535-DFA2-CCB1-A2CB279D86346994 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=5BE56535-DFA2-CCB1-A2CB279D86346994& Mon, 27 Dec 2010 09:31:40 GMT This is a fieldbook to serve as a tool for tobacco prevention, intervention and cessation. The fieldbook can be used to help develop a vision on community readiness for tobacco prevention/intervention/cessation/policy. The purpose of the guideline is to: establish and maintain and IHS-wide infrastructure for the effective development, implementation, and evaluation of tobacco dependence treatment educational programs Develop community-based programs and build relationships with existing tobacco prevention and education coalitions and alliances to enhance our ability to provide effective, affordable, state-of-the-art tobacco dependence treatment programs Design systems and processes that will be self-sustaining by the end of the project period. www.iknowmine.org http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=9831CB08-C2A9-5581-33725648B39B31C6 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=9831CB08-C2A9-5581-33725648B39B31C6& Thu, 28 Oct 2010 10:48:46 GMT www.iknowmine.org is the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consoritum STD Program’s new and exciting sexual health website for youth! This website is intended to give teenagers and adolescents the tools necessary to make healthy decisions when it comes to sex. On iknowmine.org youth can: order condoms, order chlamydia and gonorrhea home testing kits [coming soon in 2010], ask sexual health questions to Anchorage-based providers, find specific information on STDs, HIV, unplanned pregnancy and related issues, find HIV/STD testing locations throughout Alaska, request testing appointments, watch videos and read stories about STDs/HIV and unplanned pregnancy and participate in polls, surveys and a blog. We also encourage you to use this website as a portal for sexual health education, information and resources. If you want to receive more materials please feel free to email Jessica Leston at jdleston@anthc.org or Connie Jessen at cmjessen@anthc.org. You can also reach us toll free at 877-334-8762. Family Effectiveness Training [FET] http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C3A4CB03-CE3E-EFD8-2D4EDA4C6C6C9A6C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C3A4CB03-CE3E-EFD8-2D4EDA4C6C6C9A6C& Thu, 28 Oct 2010 10:38:20 GMT Family Effectiveness Training [FET] is a culturally competent evidence based practice with model designation by SAMHSA. FET is a prevention/ early intervention model, effective in reducing risk factors and increasing protective factors for children and adolescents who are at risk for substance abuse and related disruptive behaviors. A family-based program originally developed for Hispanics, it has been adapted for Native American and African American populations. Family Effectiveness Training, while tested with preadolescents ages 6 to 12, can be applied to other ages as long as the target use is in the prevention/early intervention stage. It targets three family factors that place children at risk: 1] problems in family functioning, 2] parent-child conflicts, and 3] intergenerational / cultural conflicts between children and parents. During 13 family sessions, the goals of FET are: a] to strengthen families as they adapt to cultural and developmental challenges, b] increase substance abuse resistance, c] increase family cohesiveness, and d] bridge the culture gap between parents and children. The program blends three components: Brief Strategic Family Therapy [BSFT], Family Development, and Bicultural Effectiveness Training. worksite wellness gardens http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=D67C48D2-D3C7-B886-29CBFAB1454FAD3D http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=D67C48D2-D3C7-B886-29CBFAB1454FAD3D& Thu, 28 Oct 2010 10:35:37 GMT Raised bed gardens have been places at 5 sites in the Oklahoma City Area. The gardens are planted and maintained by the employees during their 15 min. breaks at the worksite. 2-5 employeess share the 4 x 8 foot beds. The small amount of time spent working their shared garden has provided a healty alternative for the workday break periods. Many of the partisipants took the knowledge they gained from building the garden beds and extended it to their homes. The garden became a family fitness activity. STD Arizona Tribal Collaboration http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=B17F2ABE-FE10-385A-44B70EC6D4A1E8FF http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=B17F2ABE-FE10-385A-44B70EC6D4A1E8FF& Mon, 18 Oct 2010 05:26:29 GMT Sexually transmitted diseases in AI/AN populations have placed a substantial burden on the Indian Health care systems[ITU]. In 2007 among all races and ethnicities, AI/ANs had the second highest rates for chlamydia, gonnorrhea and the third highest rates of primary and secondary syphilis. In Arizona, chlamydia and gonorrhea rates for AI/AN were second highest 2003 thru 2007. In 2007 there was a major syphillis outbreak in a tribal community, which resulted in 107 cases. Most alarming was the number of congenital syphilis births,in AI/AN in 2008[5]. In 2009 Phoenix Indian Medical Center[PIMC] had 2 congential syphilis births. Given this information and having specialized STD public health nursing expertise, the PIMC public health nursing program took the lead in moving forward the planning,and implementation of a capacity building agenda for the Tribal/State collaboration for STD. The multidisciplinary planning team consisted of IHS public health nursing, Arizona State STD program staff and CDC Public Health Advisors. The collabortion had 53 participants from various tribal communities in Arizona. The agenda was developed to provide updates to reflect the seriousness of this health concern, partner services, best practices/lessons learned from 2 tribal syphilis outbreaks,round table discussions[barriers,what is being done,and what is needed to improve], and next steps. Evaluations were excellent. The impact of the Tribal/State STD collaboration will be ongoing. As a result of this PHNs team insight, a monentum and commitment by tribal, state and federal programs has begun. The tribal group identified areas for improvement and partnerships to include, but not limited too alcohol and drug, behavioral health, Hispanic communities, tribal leadership, educational programs, parenting education, healthy choice curriculums,tribal correctional facilities and youth programs. The outcome of the collaboration is the development of an RFP from Arizona State STD program for AI/AN communities to addresses needs presented in the collaborations for 2011. IHS Injury Prevention Fellowship Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=D35E610E-FF09-2659-95E9F76E3C445A1C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=D35E610E-FF09-2659-95E9F76E3C445A1C& Wed, 12 May 2010 09:19:53 GMT The IHS Injury Prevention Fellowship Program is a 12-month advanced learning experience for individuals promoting injury prevention in American Indian/Alaska Native communities. Building on the IHS Injury Prevention Program short courses - and the prior experiences of the participants - the Fellowship offers advanced training in community interventions, coalition building, injury epidemiology, program evaluation, presentation skills, and field work. Fellows apply this training by working on individual projects involving data collection and/or program implementation and evaluation. There are actually two Fellowship programs, the Program Development Fellowship and the Epidemiology Fellowship. The two Fellowships have a similar structure: 4 course sessions and a 2-day symposium; completion of a project that will have an impact on injuries in the community. The Epidemiology Fellowship requires a bachelor's degree, and offers graduate credit from the University of Michigan's Summer Epidemiology Institute. What do participants gain from the Fellowship? * Enhanced skills in community injury prevention: Designing a project, Promoting community involvement, Data collection and analysis, Oral and written presentations; * A knowledge of "best practices" for prevention of intentional and unintentional injuries; *Improved effectiveness and satisfaction in your injury prevention work; * Individualized learning experiences (e.g., using GPS devices); * College credits from the University of Michigan (Epidemiology Fellowship); * Completion of a project that will help reduce injuries in your community. Leech Lake Tribal College/Community Education http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153F94-F676-B7BA-BC19DED38C89B01D http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153F94-F676-B7BA-BC19DED38C89B01D& Tue, 20 Apr 2010 13:05:11 GMT The Leech Lake Tribal College has been offering Herbal Remedies classes for over a year on a monthly basis. Topics covered are an herbal medicine chest, teas to de-toxify the body, teas & tinctures to build up the body, traditional medicines and teas, traditional foods, and traditional health medicine recipes.<br><br> The Leech Lake Tribal College Community Education is currently sponsoring a semester long Herbal Remedies class. The students are learning about common MN herbs and plants such as: Yarrow, Nettle, Chamomile, Cleavers, Plantain, Dandelion, Red Clover, Mullein, Lemon Balm, Elder Flower, and Lavender. The class is hands on for harvesting, picking, seeing, touching, smelling, drinking, making tinctures, teas, salves, and syrups. Students are learning to identify what can help themselves and their families. They are also noting that these herbs are in their yards and out their own back doors. The class has harvested swamp tea and cedar tea also.<br><br> Next semester’s class is planned to look at the whole person, body, mind, emotions and spirit with a cultural, traditional, herbal emphasis. Many activities are planned along with many healing modalities. Indian Health Care Resource Center Wellness Adventure Diabetes Prevention & Wellness Camps http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C81542EF-F0DE-6797-B171094A5EC38546 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C81542EF-F0DE-6797-B171094A5EC38546& Tue, 20 Apr 2010 13:02:04 GMT Indian Health Care Resource Center is an urban Indian clinic providing services to the Tulsa metro area. We are seeing high numbers of childhood obesity cases, as is typical of most Indian clinics. In our youth ages 5 - 12, 30% are above the 85th percentile on BMI for age. Of the youth ages 13 - 18, 35% are above the 85th percentile on BMI for age. Based on this need, we have established several youth programs designed to combat the childhood obesity problem in hopes of reducing future cases of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.<BR><BR>IHCRC collaborates with the Tulsa Public Schools Challenge Course to provide a summer day camp program that is designed to reduce the risk for diabetes in Native American children. A customized, culturally specific curriculum was developed that utilizes experiential learning activities; Challenge Course high and low elements; asset building and resiliency training. <BR><BR>Children in grades 1 – 8 learn concepts of healthy lifestyles, including fitness, nutrition, and making positive decisions, which result in healthier life choices in the effort to prevent diabetes. Asset building and resiliency training develop the abilities that children need in order to make good choices.<BR><BR>Parents report healthy lifestyle changes, such as children requesting that pop not be available at home. A healthy lunch and snack are provided.<BR><BR>The camp serves over 170 at-risk children each summer, and is free to all participants. Community Food and Nutrition Program (CFN) http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E732-DD02-AD52-FB0A15713FCC95C7 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E732-DD02-AD52-FB0A15713FCC95C7& Tue, 20 Apr 2010 13:01:27 GMT The Community Food and Nutrition Program is designed to improve the health and nutrition status of low-income people by increasing and improving access to, or information about, healthy, nutritious foods. The program seeks to build community food assistance capacity, rather than deliver services. Wagner Indian Health Service – Healthy Heart Project http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153DAF-C853-5595-C3DF0A9B87742E14 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153DAF-C853-5595-C3DF0A9B87742E14& Mon, 22 Feb 2010 14:26:53 GMT This project is funded by an SDPI (Special Diabetes for Indians) Grant. It is a special demonstration project to reduce cardiovascular disease in persons with diabetes. The annual goal is to recruit 50 persons to participate in a case management based approach to bring all target values to goal. The project strives to assist patients to achieve optimal cardiovascular health by improving lipid levels, glycemic levels, and blood pressure. Each participant is encouraged to adopt lifestyle changes such as 150 minutes of exercise/week along with an individualized nutritional plan. The case management visits feature behavioral health coaching utilizing motivational interviewing techniques. The Wagner Healthy Heart (HH) Project has taken Diabetes Self Management Education (DSME) Program to “Point-of-Care”. We strive to connect with each patient in routine diabetes clinics. The patients who participate in the Healthy Heart Project are given the choice of monthly visits/CVD risk reduction as the next step. A special registry is in place for our DSME Graduates. The HH staff has developed a new handout with ABC numbers for recruitment in clinic. <BR><BR> To recognize participants who have reached their health goals, we have developed a wall in clinic for “HEALTH HEROES”. Participants who are successful agree to share their stories and photos with everyone. <BR><BR> The project also offers Honoring the Gift of Heart Health (HGHH) classes. This curriculum was developed by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. It is a comprehensive culturally appropriate, user-friendly 10 lesson course on heart-health education for the American Indian community. The curriculum is filled with skill-building activities, reproducible handouts, and idea starters. The course is offered in a series of class sessions. Each session is repeated twice throughout the week. So a participant is able to complete all required classes by attending 2 full days or 4 half days. The HGHH curriculum is offered every quarter in this fashion. <BR><BR> We began a Healthy Heart monthly support group where project participants can share and learn more lessons in the HGHH curriculum. The group meets on a monthly basis. In addition to the HGHH the support group has featured 2 picnics by the lake, a discussion on foot care and humor as a therapeutic medium. <BR><BR> To make an old topic new, we have utilized the principle of Volumetrics to encourage intake of fruits/vegetables and other whole grains. An interactive display was created to aid in the instructive process. A very successful retention activity in held annually. A two day patient conference focuses on improving health through a balance of mental, emotional, spiritual and physical health. Guest speakers present stimulating approaches to draw on Native American traditions to deal with modern day stresses and chronic disease. <BR><BR> Since intensive activities began in January of 2006, 83 persons have agreed to participate in the program. The attached graphic illustrates improvements in cardiovascular risk factors for persons completing their first year of participation in the Healthy Heart Project. There is no cost for participation in this project. Community Guide's systematic review of effective population based interventions - Physical Activity http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D486-F74E-930E-84D60C192F787C65 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D486-F74E-930E-84D60C192F787C65& Thu, 11 Feb 2010 12:39:31 GMT The community guide lists interventions that are either "strongly recommended" or "recommended" by the Task Force. The Community Guide's systematic review of the effectiveness of selected population based interventions designed to increase levels of physical activity focused on interventions in three areas: <ul> <li>Informational approaches to increasing physical activity </li> <li>Behavioral and social approaches to increasing physical activity </li> <li>Environmental and policy changes to increasing physical activity </li> </ul> Interventions that were recommended or strongly recommended included - two informational approaches: <ul> <li>communitywide campaigns </li> <li>point-of-decision prompts to encourage using stairs three behavioral and social approaches:</li> <ul> <li>school-based physical education</li> <li>social support interventions in community settings (e.g., setting up a buddy system or contracting with another person to complete specified limits of physical activity) </li> <li>individually adapted health behavior change one environmental and policy approach: creation of or enhanced access to places for physical activity combined with informational outreach activities.</li> </ul> </ul> Active Living Research and the Movement for Healthy Communities http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EFCD-EC3C-DCAF-05E4316D79D47899 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EFCD-EC3C-DCAF-05E4316D79D47899& Thu, 11 Feb 2010 12:31:49 GMT <p>This commentary focuses on the need for community involvement at all levels of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Active Living Research (ALR) program. Of particular importance is involvement by and in communities of low socioeconomic status and/or communities with high proportions of ethnic and racial minorities. Although initial research has shown that both income and minority status can be associated with less active lifestyles, a stronger evidence base is needed to elucidate those relationships, and thus create policies that will be effective in addressing needs of those communities. The author points out that, in general, communities of disadvantaged people are understudied, with the result of "one size fits all" conclusions that are not applicable across ethnicities and classes.</p> <p>Although the ALR program has prioritized the needs of communities at high risk of obesity, much work remains to be done. In the future, it will be vital to avoid strictly top-down approaches when building coalitions to address physical activity levels in underserved communities. Lastly, the author points out that physical activity levels and unhealthy behaviors in these communities are problems that affect our entire society. The effects of chronic poor health in these communities ripple out to everyone, in the form of health care costs, workforce productivity, consumer spending and numerous other ways.</p> Fit Families Novela Series: For Parents Who Want the Best for Their Families http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D802F6-0ED6-BB12-42EB084E91CBD958 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D802F6-0ED6-BB12-42EB084E91CBD958& Thu, 11 Feb 2010 12:29:29 GMT Fit Families Novela Series: For Parents Who Want the Best for Their Families. This innovative bi-lingual resource kit was created for health professionals working with parents with young children. The video and print fotonovelas are designed to stimulate discussion on how to create healthy snacks, increase physical activity, and limit TV watching. Created using realistic characters who are struggling to make improvements in their families' health habits, the novelas help parents understand how small changes can make a big difference. Let's Get Moving! Working Together to Promote Active Lifestyles in Young Children. This exciting new resource kit for childcare providers, professionals, and parents is designed to introduce quick and easy ways to incorporate physical activity into the daily routines of children ages 2 through 7. The kit highlights ways to promote activity in 5 - 10 minute intervals throughout the day. The video and activity cards emphasize the importance of being physically active in increasing confidence, self-esteem, problem solving and social skills, and in building lifelong healthy and active habits. All Stars Prevention http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FA3C-0F56-488D-9D6D50C869DEEDCE http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FA3C-0F56-488D-9D6D50C869DEEDCE& Thu, 11 Feb 2010 12:26:52 GMT All Stars is a school- or community-based program designed to delay and prevent high-risk behaviors in middle school-age adolescents (11 to 14 years old), including substance use, violence, and premature sexual activity, by fostering development of positive personal characteristics. All Stars is based on research that has identified the critical factors that lead young people to begin experimenting with substances and participating in other high risk behaviors. Guide to Community Preventive Services for Promoting Physical Activity - Evaluation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80EFB-C9AA-ACFC-E6C0A7629A81957C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80EFB-C9AA-ACFC-E6C0A7629A81957C& Thu, 11 Feb 2010 11:59:39 GMT This CDC resource outlines the six basic steps of program evaluation and illustrates each step with physical activity program examples. Appendices provide information about physical activity indicators, practical case studies, and additional evaluation resources President's Physical Fitness Challenge http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E3E7-B1F5-951A-8186E4BDAEDBCEEB http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E3E7-B1F5-951A-8186E4BDAEDBCEEB& Thu, 11 Feb 2010 11:45:50 GMT This program is established to help kids, teens, adults and seniors of all activity levels get and stay fit. Turtle Mountain Tribal Diabetes Prevention Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153D90-AB70-41CC-B45DCA8137CB6A16 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153D90-AB70-41CC-B45DCA8137CB6A16& Tue, 03 Nov 2009 11:45:31 GMT <p>The Turtle Mountain Reservation Tribal Diabetes Program has been screening Kindergarten through eight grades for seven years (this year we started with Head start). They are screened for Acanthosis Nigricans, weight, height and age. We write letters to the parents of the children who are at risk and we hold counseling sessions, for the families. During the summer we have four weeks of camp and invite the kids who are at risk for overweight, hypertension, diabetes and cardiac disease to come to camp. We have had a successful three years of Summer camp. Many of the children have gained strength, self esteem and lost weight during this time period. We have partnered up with the Turtle Mountain Community College, they run the activities, and the diabetes program conducts nutrition and health classes. It has been very successful three years.</p> IHS Comprehensive Health Care Facility-Touch Your Enemy Learning Center http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153D03-0A9D-5955-837DD2763AC6C136 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153D03-0A9D-5955-837DD2763AC6C136& GMT The Touch Your Enemy (TYE) Learning Center is an initiative that was created by a group of caring and compassionate staff members at the IHS CHCF, Winnebago, NE who want to make a major difference in how health care education is offered and delivered to the tribal community. This unique approach provides educational, spiritual, recreational, health, and social programs to educate residents of all ages within our local community. The education is provided through all means in which people learn—visual, audio, hands-on. This is offered through the effective use of video, computer, telehealth, reading materials, and instructor led training.<br><br> The idea behind the TYE Learning Center came from the following: Warfare is a very real part of the culture of our tribal ancestors. In today’s health arena, tribal people are battling a different kind of war which requires a different kind of warrior—a war against chronic diseases. This requires different ways of gathering strength and respect. However different, what remains the same is that we fight for honor, respect, protection, and longevity. Many times during warfare there were no deaths because the focus was on respect, honor, and proving yourself. The most courageous act one could accomplish during war, was to physically touch your enemy without killing them, rendering them troubled and distraught at the thought of knowing death was so close yet did not happen—one of the greatest signs of bravery. <br><br> The learning center is operated by the staff from all of the local health and educational programs in conjunction with tribal governmental agencies, businesses, vocational education programs, institutions of higher education, community colleges, cultural traditional healings, recreational, tribal elders, and other community and human service entities. <br><br> Together—as ONE – we will make great strides to prevent chronic diseases in our people. <br><br> The TYE Learning Center is scheduled three months out. This allows programs to showcase their special services through: <br><br> <ol> <li>Health and Education</li> <li>Recruitment and Retention</li> <li>Assessment and Monitoring</li> <li>Promotion and Prevention</li> <li>Traditional Teachings, Song, and Dance</li> </ol> Winnebago IHS and Winnebago Tribal programs share the same vision in promoting disease prevention and providing educational tools to arrest the progression of any disease processes for the overall health and well-being of our community. We recognize that chronic disease affects the spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical realms of ourselves, our families, and our community.<br><br> <strong>Note: Evaluation materials were not available for review at the time of submission. Once evaluation materials are available, this note will be removed.</strong> Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation (BBAHC) http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153DFD-EA0F-F988-FA38A4B890C4EF12 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153DFD-EA0F-F988-FA38A4B890C4EF12& GMT The BBAHC developed a bicycle/helmet program in May 2007 after visiting the village of Goodnews Bay, AK. The village council was providing helmets to students, but many students did not have bikes to ride. The Diabetes Program decided to see how many students within Bristol Bay did not have a bike or a functioning bike. Diabetes funds were used to purchase 877 bikes and >1000 helmets. Tribal village councils, Community Health Aides and Tribal Children’s Social Workers assisted in compiling a list of students among the 27 villages that participated. Bicycles were ordered based on student’s height and helmets ordered based on students head circumference. <br><br><strong>Partnership</strong><br>: BBAHC, Injury Prevention Department. Diabetes Program worked with Mary Clark in providing bike safety and helmet use during her village trips. <BR><BR> No cost to participate. Required to have height, weight and head circumference taken. Signed a bike agreement upon receiving the bike/helmet…agreeing to take care of the bike, wear the helmet, ride on right side of the road, wear reflector tape, learn how to signal while riding and to attend bike safety class when offered in the community. SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153E1D-0E72-4A4B-6550CCE05DA96A7B http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153E1D-0E72-4A4B-6550CCE05DA96A7B& GMT SEARHC has been working in partnership with the Jilkaat Kwann Cultural Heritage Center for the past year to support the tribe’s social and economic development plan and to improve chronic disease risks for all Klukwan residents. This pilot program supports a series of Traditional Knowledge Camps throughout the year. Camps include learning about and experiencing subsistence lifestyle skills and other traditional knowledge important to re-establishing links to the active Tlingit culture that have been lost in the last generation, due to cultural upheaval. Current camps include processing and storage of salmon, hooligan, and moose, and carving of totem poles, paddles, and a 35 foot canoe.<br> Participants in the camps and their families receive a physical exam, including tobacco use, weight, blood pressure, cholesterol, and glucose screening, on a yearly basis. Differences between baseline and each subsequent screen are calculated. <br> Preliminary data shown a decrease in risks among community members since the start of the camps: <ol> <li>Blood Pressure</li> <ol> <li>The average drop in systolic blood pressure, of the residents who have two screenings at least one year apart is 2.34</li> <li>The average drop in diastolic blood pressure, of the residents who have two screenings at least one year apart is 2.15</li> </ol> <li>Weight</li> <li>The average drop in weight, of the residents who have two screenings at least one year apart is 2.73 pounds.</li> <li>Total Cholesterol</li> <ol> <li>The average drop in cholesterol, of the residents who have two screenings at least one year apart is 4.55. </li> </ol> <li>Tobacco Use</li> <ol> <li>20% (2 of 10) tobacco users quit smoking during their WISEFAMILY encounter period.</li> <li>60% (6 of 10) of tobacco users received tobacco cessation education; </li> <li>33% of tobacco users who received counseling quit and have stayed quit. </li> </ol> <li>Education <br> 56% (49 of 88) participated in education offerings: </li> <ol> <li>33 participated in physical activity education</li> <li>24 participated in nutrition education/activities</li> <li>40 participated in Traditional Knowledge Camps</li> <li>6 received tobacco cessation support/education </li> </ol> <ol> The Project’s Long-Term Objective: Improve nutrition, increase physical activity, reduce tobacco use and exposure, increase skills and traditional knowledge in subsistence, cultural, artistic, and linguistic activities, and contribute to the Chilkat Indian Village social and economic development strategic plan. Pine Hill Health Center http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153E5B-EB25-32D2-37976B4996691EE6 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153E5B-EB25-32D2-37976B4996691EE6& GMT More than 180 dental exams of children between 3 and 13 were done in October of 2002. Dental disease was recorded by using the standardized World Health Organization’s method. The exam format was modified to provide information about the presence of intact sealant and the need for immediate referral of the child for urgent dental care. Initial exams showed that most of the children at age 3 who entered the Headstart program with fairly good dental health. Majority of the kids had only one or two small lesions, while 54% had no tooth decay. By the second year of Headstart children had active tooth decay. Up to 16.3% form 4.9% the year before. Using this data, a decision was made to use a 0.2% fluoride rinse program.<BR><BR> Dental staff personnel were trained in the use of fluoride varnish, foam and rinse. The dental assistant provided supervision for the Headstart Program. The 0.2% rinse was used twice a week for 5 minutes or as long as the kids could tolerate the rinse with out swallowing it. To get the community involved the dental staff provided presentations to community groups. The school staff was trained to provide the fluoride treatments and soon they were able to assume the job.<BR><BR> Follow up exams on 241 children one year later were impressive. Exams showed the percentage of children with dental decay was reduced from 63% to 37%. Where decay did exist it was not to the extent that it had once been. It decreased from 4.44 surfaces to 1.34 surfaces per child. Over the first nine months of 2003 only five stainless steel crowns were placed on primary teeth as compared to 42 during the same period in the past year. Over the summer the Headstart program planned to encourage use of the fluoride. Caregivers came to the school to pick up the rinse; unless there were difficulties getting there bus drives and aides delivered the rinse to homes. Eighty percent of the children were disease free in September when they returned to school. University of New Mexico Department of Family and Community Medicine http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153E7A-CD38-2656-854386D64C50C9A7 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153E7A-CD38-2656-854386D64C50C9A7& GMT Native Americans value the ability to integrate traditional and western medicine for the treatment of chronic diseases such as diabetes. Healthcare professionals have been concerned that herbal treatments might be harmful or lead patients away from evidence-based therapies and self-monitoring of blood glucose also, the data is limited from clinical trials about the efficacy of herbs. <br><br> Between 2001 and 2003, 203 participants were recruited during a randomized clinical trial on the Navajo Nation. Participants were asked about their use of traditional medicines for diabetes and their blood glucose monitoring practices. One hundred ninety five (96%) of the 203 participants responded to the question about herb use. Of the 195 (30%) 58 reported that they used herbs, some used multiple herbs. Twenty seven different herbs were identified by the participants. The most frequently named herb was sage (15%), next were cedar and juniper both at 10%. <br><br> Nineteen percent of the participants used insulin to control their diabetes (21% were herb users and 19% were nonusers). There were no significant differences in performance (P=0.88) or frequency (P=0.44) of self-monitoring of blood glucose. There was no significant associationbetween herb use and sex (P=0.72), age (P=11), level of education (P=0.92), ability to speak or understand English (P=0.84). How long it took for participants to get to the clinic was associated with the use of herbs (P=0.02). Those traveling more than or equal to 60 minutes for healthcare were more likely to use herbs than those traveling less than or equal to 30 minutes (22 and 41%, respectively). The observations of Kim and Kwok, who found that alternative medicine is widely used by different cultural groups for common diseases. The sample that participated in the study may not have been representative of all Navajo people with diabetes, it is still important that the use of traditional medicine in this group of patients was not associated with diabetes control. American Indian Health Service of Chicago , INC. http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153EA9-9C68-D949-17749EA3A0135CDA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153EA9-9C68-D949-17749EA3A0135CDA& GMT Diabetes Test Reminders: Many of our patients are not returning in a timely manner for important diabetes tests, such as AIC, microalbumin, dilated eye exam, cholesterol screening, kidney function tests. <br><br> We decided to try sending out ticklers to remind patients that tests were needed, and how important these tests were for diabetic patients, in hopes that this would increase compliance. The tickler method is being used to remind patients of Pap smears and have been very effective. <br><br> Charts reviewed for 87 diabetic patients and letters sent to the 57 patients who needed tests. Letters also included information about flu shots and upcoming diabetes classes. The other 30 patients also received letters about diabetes classes and importance of flu shots. <br><br> Charts will be reviewed again in January to see if mailings are an effective method to increase compliance in this area. <br><br> Flu shot availability notification: <br><br> Letters were sent to 97 diabetic patients informing them of flu shot availability at American Indian Health Services of Chicago, and why it is important for diabetics to get the flu shot. We will compare number of flu shots given to diabetics this year as compared to previous year to see if this is effective. Milwaukee WOLFE (Work out, Low Fat for Elders) program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153EC8-C16E-98E2-A7E6A52E70A1F8EB http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153EC8-C16E-98E2-A7E6A52E70A1F8EB& GMT The objective of the Milwaukee WOLFE (Work out, Low Fat for Elders) program is to prevent & control Type 2 Diabetes and to maintain heart health by promoting & supporting healthy lifestyles for weight control, increased physical activity, and better nutrition in the urban Native American Elder population of Milwaukee County. <BR><BR>Milwaukee’s WOLFE (Work Out, Low Fat for Elders) program is collaboration between the Gerald L Ignace Indian Health Center (GLIIHC) and the Indian Council of the Elderly with the aim of improving the health & well being of urban Native American Elders. Weekly fitness, nutrition education, and healthy cooking class sessions support the prevention & control of type 2 diabetes and the maintenance of heart health. <BR><BR> Originally part of a larger research effort, independent testing performed by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee showed improvements in health indicators attributed to a year of participation of the project. After the initial success of the 2004-2005 program, grant funding was secured for another 3 years to continue the wellness effort. The primary goal of the project are to connect Milwaukee Indian Elders to a health & wellness effort by promoting physical activity as a primary choice for reducing risk for and development of chronic conditions and behaviors. The secondary goal of the project is to maintain cultural appropriateness.<br><br> The WOLFE program has entered its third year with many of the original participants as well as new faces. Weekly sessions start with a one-hour fitness class led by GLIIHC’s qualified fitness consultant. Fitness activities usually include cardiovascular exercise along with People with Arthritis Can Exercise (PACE) training but have been known to explore swimming, walking, & tai chi. Fitness is followed by a two hour nutrition & cooking class led by GLIIHC’s registered dietitian. The class includes time to share the healthy meal the WOLFE members have just learned to prepare. Nutrition classes aim to incorporate traditional Native American foods in learning sessions. Sessions explore reoccurring themes such as healthy fats, whole grains, increasing flavor without added fat and sodium, lean sources of protein, food as medicine, seasonal eating, budgeting healthy foods, and more. WOLFE members have enjoyed field trips to parks, public markets, and urban ecology centers. Lac du Flambeau Center for Fitness http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153F17-9A5E-4C36-857877B6901145C8 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153F17-9A5E-4C36-857877B6901145C8& GMT The Center for Fitness has implemented a Wellness Scholarship in hopes of reaching potential members that have limited financial capabilities, but by also allowing these members to take a vested financial interest in their membership. <br><br> Through this scholarship we aim to educate on the importance of combining fitness and nutrition to our communities’ wellness goals. We aim to continually stress how important exercise combined with nutrition are the lock and key to managing the demands of life and the curves it throws at you. We hope our program will meet the needs of our community in addressing that fitness, wellness and exercise is necessary across the lifespan. <br><br> Our objectives are to combine fitness and nutrition by using a vested financial interest plan for members to reach their wellness goals. Our methods include a 2-week registration period for new membership. Upon registration new members will be given both a nutrition in-take assessment and a fitness assessment. The nutrition component will comprise of a Tanita body composition and weight assessment, 24-hour recall, diet and nutrition history, discussion of patients goals, and meal planning. The fitness assessment will consist of blood pressure testing, bicep strength, sit and reach, cardiovascular test using a 3-minute step test, girth measurements and a skin fold caliper test using by testing 3 sites. All of these scores will be used as each member’s baseline scores to address areas to improve in or made modifications in. Our strategies include holding our members accountable to their goals. Guidelines for participation include: Exercise a minimum of 12 times per month. Each exercise session should be a minimum of 30 minutes each. During each visit members will sign in and sign out on a designated log-book for tracking. Every 3 month at a minimum they will receive a follow-up fitness assessment. Each month members will meet with the Dietitian 2 times per month to discuss nutrition goals and outcomes. <br><br> Upon completion of each month: Each member will be evaluated on meeting the program guidelines. If all criteria are met, one of 2 possibilities could occur: $15 is returned back to the member in the form of cash back. Or $15 is credited to their next months’ membership to continue with the program. <br><br> When setting goals with the member it will be collaboration between the member and the staff (either the exercise physiologist or dietitian). All goals will be reasonable and measurable. During the 2-week window of sign-up we will have a nutrition/ fitness handout of the month that the member can take home with them on a variety of topics to be determined by the staff member. Leech Lake Special Diabetes http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153F65-E71F-5386-084CE6A3F9F817A9 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153F65-E71F-5386-084CE6A3F9F817A9& GMT Many American Indians have experienced drastic lifestyle and cultural changes and have adopted a “westernized” lifestyle characterized with a diet high in fat and sugar with a change to sedentary lifestyles. The combination of these foods and activity changes along with genetic factors has resulted in high rates of diabetes and obesity. As many of us know it is all about education, so we have incorporated the “Just Move It” campaign into schools in our area that includes the W.O.L.F. (Work Out Low Fat) curriculum which teaches the children (K-5) as well as adults about diet and exercise. We have incorporated techniques focused on prevention offering individual and group programs in a variety of settings but mainly in the school atmosphere. One of the schools we work with is culturally grounded and our main focus towards nutrition is going back to our cultural foods. A diet low in fat and high in protein. We are providing programs that emphasize learning lifetime skills for a healthy diet and increased physical activity. To gauge our success we are measuring all that are participating with a mini screen of height, weight, waist circumference, flexibility, blood pressure, fasting glucose/cholesterol and resting heart rate with a step-test. With this mini screen we identify at risk individuals and refer them to clinic. <br><br> Example<br><br> Leech Lake Special Diabetes has undertaken many challenges by incorporating fresh and new ideas with an approach to the “prevention” of diabetes. This program promotes weight loss through a coordinated effort of exercise, nutrition and education with our Registered Dieticians. Participants must sign up to be mini screened with height, weight, waist circumference, flexibility, blood pressure, fasting glucose/cholesterol and resting heart rate with a step-test. Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawas Community Health Department http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153FB3-AFF6-805A-1F150700016CD98D http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153FB3-AFF6-805A-1F150700016CD98D& GMT The Home Grown Project is an ongoing, multiyear program designed to reawaken our spiritual relationship with the foods that we eat. There is an emphasis on food as Mskiki-strength from the earth. We encourage the use and consumption of fresh, locally grown fruits and vegetables among our tribal community members, honoring that plant or animal that gave up its life so that we could live. These were a part of our traditional diet, before the explosion of disease we have now. Many of our elders remember gardening, canning, hunting and gathering with their families as children. Along the way, for various reasons, a lot of that lifestyle has been lost. We hope to stimulate interest in renewing these activities, as well as planting memories for the little ones to come back to as adults. Eating foods in the purest form, direct from Mother Earth, along with increased physical activity will help us combat diabetes and obesity, as well as many other diseases prevalent in our communities. <br><br>The first stage of the project, which is ongoing, consists of a community-supported agriculture program. A local small farmer is paid a lump sum to plant extra seed and as the produce ripens it is brought in to our clinic and government center and made available to all community members but with a focus on our diabetic, pre-diabetic, elderly and young family populations. People who sign up for the project agree to regular visits to the clinic and/or the Community Health nurse, as well as participating in monthly cooking and food preservation classes. The second stage is aimed at getting people motivated to gather their own food: it involves setting up gathering events such as picking strawberries in June, blackberries and corn in August, and apples in September. Families are encouraged to take part, and we've had all ages from toddlers to elders participating. The third stage, which is still pending, involves getting the participants to grow their own food. We will be investing in raised bed gardens, and window-box gardens for elders. Ultimately the goal is to have our own large community gardens and/or orchards. Community Health staff are actively involved in the project, in collaboration with some other tribal departments such as Natural Resources, Environmental Services and the Elders program. Riverside – San Bernardino County Indian Health, INC. Habit 4 Health Fitness Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153FE2-CD6D-2A2B-F885BA54E6F6237C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8153FE2-CD6D-2A2B-F885BA54E6F6237C& GMT HABIT 4 HEALTH is a Fitness Program, developed by our Fitness Specialist, Antonia Barrett, to improve your current level of health and wellbeing, to improve diabetes control, and to prevent the onset of medical problems due to physical inactivity. <br><br> Physical activity is one of the most important tools to maintain and improve overall health and wellness. Unfortunately, less than 27% of adults in the United States are active enough to gain any health benefits from exercise.<br><br> The HABIT 4 HEALTH Fitness Program is comprised of several key components of fitness including strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular fitness. You may participate in the walking program and the resistance training, as well as receive an individualized plan for exercise to meet your fitness goals. Your baseline results from your personal fitness assessment will be recorded. As you continue in the program, you will receive feedback on your progress and will be able to see your results.<br><br> To sign up for HABIT4HEALTH, schedule an appointment for your personal fitness assessment, please call the Diabetes Program Administrative Assistant, Claudia Magana, at 1-800-732-8805, extension 330. If you would like to learn more about the program, please contact the Fitness Specialist, Antonia Barrett, at 1-800-732-8805, extension 260. <br><br> What is the meaning of the "4"?<br><br> The 1996 Surgeon General's Report states: Americans should accumulate 30 minutes of physcial activity on most, preferably all, days of the week. Therefore, participating in physical activities "4" days out of the week would meet the Surgeon General's goal. Also, the "4" represents the elements of health that are improved through physical activity:<br><br> Energy = individuals feel more rested and have the power to accomplish daily and work-related tasks<br> Efficiency = fitness improves the overall physiological function of the heart and organs<br> Effort = individuals complete given tasks with less effort than that which was needed prior to fitness <br> Esteem = a positive sense of self and wellbeing is accomplished through fitness.<br> Catawba Service Unit-Blood Pressure Education Classes http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C815403F-D0EA-2F79-6F59E6684F2072C7 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C815403F-D0EA-2F79-6F59E6684F2072C7& GMT The CSU has offered monthly Blood Pressure education classes for patients with hypertension and cardiovascular disease for the past 2.5 years. The primary objective of the program is to offer healthy life style choices that will help the individual maintain control of his/her hypertension and/or cardiovascular disease and reduce complications. <br><br> Topics related to blood pressure control and Cardiovascular disease are covered-definitions, causes, nutrition, medication and adherence, how to increase activity, stress management and symptoms of stroke and heart attack.<br><br> The class is typically given in two 2-hour sessions, a week apart. Participants pick a lifestyle change they would like to begin working on in the coming week and report progress/obstacles and successes the second week. A packet of written material and recipes are given, many are Native American oriented. Material is drawn from Honoring the Gift of Heart Health, IHS, the local Health Dept, and regional-type simple recipes that others have enjoyed. Because the literacy level of the participants has a wide range, the class structure uses several formats-videos, storytelling, group sharing, visuals such as salt and fat models, and practice with labels. <br><br> Blood pressures are checked at each class, a low fat/low sodium meal preparation demonstration is given, and opportunity for questions and sharing among the participants. A blood pressure cuff is provided for home monitoring at the end of the class. <br><br> Class size is small with no more than 8 participants each time. A RD/CDE and a CHR or CNA do the class, take blood pressures and instruct on the home monitors. It has been successful in drawing participants who normally don’t like to come to group activities, because of shyness or other reasons. They seem more likely to come if they are told the class is small and their Provider has referred them. The time is alternated between day and evening classes each month. The discussion on stress management is usually very insightful and people typically seem to want to prolong this part of the class and find help for managing the stress in their lives. Catawba Service Unit-Diabetes Shoe Clinic http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C815405F-E054-7AA5-64E836BD8EBEE5BC http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C815405F-E054-7AA5-64E836BD8EBEE5BC& GMT The CSU has offered a shoe clinic for patients with diabetes. The purpose of the clinic is to provide properly fitting footwear and appliances. The first objective is to reduce complications by eliminating pressure points and irritation from improperly fitting shoes. A second objective is to encourage increased activity and assist in reducing complications through maintaining better diabetes control. Catawba Service Unit-Nutrition Education Classes http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C815410A-A696-00EB-BA1EDAF6C2590127 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C815410A-A696-00EB-BA1EDAF6C2590127& GMT The CSU has offered quarterly nutrition education classes for diabetics and family members of diabetics for the past 3.5 years. The primary objective of the program is to offer healthy life style choices that will help the individual maintain control of his/her diabetes and reduce complications. <br><br> Blood sugars are checked, a meal preparation demonstration is given, nutrition information provided, and opportunity for questions and sharing among the participants. Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana Human Services Department http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8154139-9FBF-5448-6F1279D9CCE6CA39 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8154139-9FBF-5448-6F1279D9CCE6CA39& GMT For many years Human Services has operated Boys and Girls’ Groups for students in Kindergarten through Eight Grade. The Groups focus on Prevention Activities to assist our children in building positive self-esteem, remaining sober and drug free, conflict resolution, anger management, etc. The groups are established by gender and grades. Participants are served refreshments and door prizes during each Group Session. At the end of the year, the participants are taken on field trip. The Group Sessions are held twice per month during the school year. <br><br> The Program has not been formally evaluated. However, it has been our Tribes’ observation that the Children Groups have limited the number of referrals to Tribal Court, Tribal Police Department and Human Services in regard to juvenile matters in reference to delinquency, status offenses, child abuse/neglect referrals and suspensions from school. Eastern Band of Cherokee, Health & Medical Division, Analenisgi Center http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8154159-CE18-098A-CBDA493A58857A44 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8154159-CE18-098A-CBDA493A58857A44& GMT Sweat Therapy <br> A group for people with anxiety problems.<br><br>Sweat practices have been used around the world for thousands of years to help people gain more physical, mental, and spiritual health. This group uses group sweating with the use of a sauna as a medium for group psychotherapy for people with anxiety problems. The goal of the program is to help people reduce anxiety symptoms and improve coping. <br><br>Target Audience: Adults experiencing problems with anxiety symptoms. Generally, people who have a primary diagnosis of one of the DSM-IV-TR anxiety disorders would be appropriate for this group. This might include people who have problems with general anxiety, panic attacks, or Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.<br><br> People with more severe psychopathology such as psychotic symptoms or personality disorders would not be appropriate for this group.<br><br> Sweating is contraindicated for people with acute breathing, heart problems and/or severe spinal cord injuries, women who are pregnant or intending to become pregnant and people currently consuming alcohol can be dangerous.<br><br> How to refer: Stephen Colmant, Ph.D. for pre-group screening. Thirty-minute pre-group screening sessions are available Monday – Friday from 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM or 4:00 PM – 4:30 PM. Contact Stephen or Tonya Crowe, Analenisgi Intake Coordinator, at 497-6892.<br><br> Time & Place: <br>Wednesday 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM <br>50 Yodeler’s Holler <br>Bryson City, NC North American Indian Center of Boston / Tecumseh House http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8154187-D04A-E60E-DC8FB87164B56BFA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8154187-D04A-E60E-DC8FB87164B56BFA& GMT The North American Indian Center of Boston’s Urban Health Program, Behavioral Health Program and Tecumseh House Substance Abuse Program utilize a multidisciplinary team approach to case management. This approach serves to fully address clients’ medical, mental health and substance abuse needs. It also serves to cut down on duplication of services by keeping all departments informed of services rendered to clients and what their future needs may be. Members of the team include certified substance abuse counselors, a licensed psychologist, a diabetes program nurse, a community health nurse and a community health advocate. Regularly scheduled team members are held. Chinle Service Unit Community Nutrition Department http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C81541A7-B419-AC14-BE752D4A9C84D93F http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C81541A7-B419-AC14-BE752D4A9C84D93F& GMT The CSU Department of Community Nutrition is a program that has been developed over the past six years focusing on public health nutrition and wellness. The department utilizes the socio-ecological model and subscribes to the concept of family centered and community based public health capacity building as a foundation for affecting positive, healthy population based behavior change. We believe that, depending upon the situation, time, readiness, and resource availability, we can lead, facilitate, or assist communities along their path to wellness. Our strategies are multilevel and utilize multiple technical and professional skill sets within our staffing structure. <br><br> These strategies include: <ul> <li>worksite based lifestyle management programs to prevent chronic disease based upon Native Lifestyle Balance (completed or ongoing evaluation of four programs demonstrating relative and consistent success) </li> <li>providing technical assistance and guidance helping schools implement and evaluate their mandated wellness policies (working in partnership with CSU HP, have helped most schools in service area put wellness policies in place; now working with schools to effectively implement and properly evaluate policies) </li> <li>facilitating the coordination of local and regional efforts to enhance the growing of culturally and regionally specific fresh fruits and vegetables using geographically and culturally specific farming methods plus looking at how to enhance the marketing and selling efforts of the local producers (community capacity has increased) </li> <li>providing medical nutrition therapy and other nutrition services at the teen clinic of a local high school (more than $27,000 in reimbursement collected in FY07) </li> <li>lactation support program that incorporates both Navajo tradition and evidence based clinical practice (greater than $87,000 I reimbursement collected in FY07; education, initiation and duration rates consistently highest, or higher than most, in IHS and as compared with CDC generated rates) </li> <li>working with traditional healers to incorporate nutrition education into their practice (two years of work developing a trusting and cooperative relationship to create a culturally focused food guide in final draft stages) </li> <li>utilizing mass-media to strategically place non-traditional or "under the radar" healthy nutrition messages (various articles in local newspapers and corporate newsletters) </li> <li>social marketing (currently working with an IHS media program to develop a social marketing program to be initiated in central Navajo) </li> <li>para-professional model to supplement and expand our nutrition education efforts (train-the-trainer model enhanced with incentive program that rewards nutrition education efforts with monetary and resource reimbursement, having yielded on average greater than $30,000 per year for program partners and many free resources, incl. food demonstration kits and client incentives) </li> <li>advocacy efforts within the formal and informal community leadership to drive policy and environmental change (developing relationships with local and regional leadership) </li> </ul> Our partners include: <ul> <li>grocery stores and other businesses </li> <li>local non-profit organizations </li> <li>local school districts and their food service systems </li> <li>tribal health service programs</li> <li>IHS health service programs</li> <li>Other state and federal agencies and programs. </li> </ul> The staffing has grown from one Registered Dietitian/Public Health Nutritionist FTE to four Registered Dietitian/Public Health Nutritionist FTEs, one Office Assitant, two FTE permanent Health Technicians, and two-three FTE term Health Technicians. The IHS RRM recommends ~11 PHN/RD FTEs for a service area the size of the Chinle Service Unit. The CSU Community Nutrition department is the primary facilitator of public health nutrition efforts at the community level, and continues to work hard towards increasing and enhancing community partnerships in order for the communities within which we work and live to create an environment that easily supports making the healthiest food choices. Diné Unity Project http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C81541D6-D6C7-8FEF-50C225FF07907E1E http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C81541D6-D6C7-8FEF-50C225FF07907E1E& GMT The Diné Unity Project is a CDC funded multi-agency collaboration that targets individuals at high risk for STD’s. The project provides risk reduction education and screening through Navajo Nation detention centers and community outreach. Employing a community-based participatory approach, the Project created a theory-based risk reduction intervention that provides education on common STDs including syphilis and HIV and also offers strategies for preventing STD infection such as proper condom use and negotiation skills. The intervention is interactive, culturally-sensitive, easily translated into the Navajo language and has been successfully implemented in tribal detention and behavioral health facilites, and in community-based settings including health fairs and street outreach. Gallup Indian Medical Center Health Promotion Community Nutrition Lifestyle Balance Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8154204-F1A6-4D09-A3875231D3B5E874 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8154204-F1A6-4D09-A3875231D3B5E874& GMT The Gallup Indian Medical Center (GIMC) Hospital Lifestyle Balance (LSB) Program branched out and was started at two Gallup Service Unit Schools. The Community LSB (CLBS) is a 20 week weight loss program that was taught by the Public Health Nutritionist; Alvera Enote, RD and Recreation Specialist, Colleen Hoskie. <br><br> Obesity and overweight is a major risk factor in the development of diabetes and other lifestyle related health problems. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) showed that lifestyle changes effectively decreased the development of Type 2 diabetes; therefore, the DPP 16-lesson core curriculum was used to implement the lifestyle intervention. Lessons involved ways to establish healthy eating habits, low calorie, and low fat meal planning and moderate physical activity, such as brisk walking. <BR><BR> The Gallup Indian Medical Center (GIMC) Hospital Lifestyle Balance (LSB) Program branched out and was started at two Gallup Service Unit Schools. The Community LSB (CLBS) is a 20 week weight loss program that was taught by the Public Health Nutritionist; Alvera Enote, RD and Recreation Specialist, Colleen Hoskie.<br><br> Obesity and overweight is a major risk factor in the development of diabetes and other lifestyle related health problems. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) showed that lifestyle changes effectively decreased the development of Type 2 diabetes; therefore, the DPP 16-lesson core curriculum was used to implement the lifestyle intervention. Lessons involved ways to establish healthy eating habits, low calorie, and low fat meal planning and moderate physical activity, such as brisk walking. <br><br> Target Audience: <br><br> Wingate Elementary School parents of Family and Children Education Program (FACE) <br> Group 1 January 2006-May 2006<br> Group 2 September 2006-February 2007<br><br> Breadsprings Elementary School Auxiliary and Faculty Staff<br> Group 3 September 2006-January 2007<br> Group 4 September 2006-January 2007<br><br> Goal Statement: <br><br> The major goal for the CLSB is to assist participants in their effort to decrease body weight, lower Body Mass Index (BMI) and to prevent diabetes, and other lifestyle related health problems. <br><br> Goals/Objective 1: <br><br> Participants were expected to decrease 7% of their body weight from their initial start weight. Weekly weight checks as well as, initial start weights, ending weights and pre and post BMI calculations were tabulated. Height measurements were taken at the start of the program. <br><br> Goals/Objective 2: <br><br> Participants were expected to gradually increase their physical activity to 150 minutes per week or 30 minutes 5 days per week. Physical activity was monitored using a DIGI-WALKER 2 pedometer <br><br> Project Activities: <br><br> Nutrition Education: <br><br> Intensive nutrition education was taught and participants were given a total daily fat intake goal of 30% depending on their initial start weight. Participants kept a record of their food intake and the amount of fat grams eaten daily. This information was recorded in a Keeping Track Book. <br><br> Physical Education: <br><br> Six physical activity lessons were taught and consisted of various types of physical activity sessions like resistance training, line dancing, low impact aerobics, exercise ball, and training with weights. These lessons also included injury prevention; warm-up and cool-down stretches, correct walking technique, appropriate clothing and environmental protection during physical activity. <br><br> Participants recorded the number of steps recorded on their pedometer each day; the total numbers of steps were submitted each week. A “Walk Across America” challenge was initiated the last 15 weeks into the program. Teams were formed from each group and each team challenged each other to see who could walk the most miles. The total number of steps were converted into miles and charted across a large map of the United States. The teams who walked the most miles were awarded and recognized at the end of the program during graduation. Navajo WIC Nutrition Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8154224-BBC1-9523-B132075F0C916B28 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8154224-BBC1-9523-B132075F0C916B28& GMT The Navajo WIC Nutrition Program instigated a Breastfeeding Peer Counselor Program in July 2005. The Breastfeeding Peer Counselors (BFPCs) counsel WIC pregnant and breastfeeding women. They support women in all aspects of breastfeeding: education, encouragement, breastfeeding management, etc. Currently, there are two BFPCs at Ft. Defiance WIC (began in July 2005) and one at Winslow Indian Health Care hospital (began in March 2007). We hope to have four more BFPCs in FY 2008. The Navajo WIC Nutrition Program collaborates with IHS and 638 facilities in the areas where there are BFPCs. We have already seen that Ft. Defiance WIC has the highest breastfeeding rate of all the Navajo WIC Nutrition Program clinics. The BFPC Program is based on extensive research done by USDA. The BFPCs are trained using the Loving Support Curriculum before they do any counseling with pregnant and breastfeeding women. Indian Health Care Resource Center After School Programs http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8154253-E3DB-F02E-EDD0EC575376377E http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8154253-E3DB-F02E-EDD0EC575376377E& GMT After School Programs<BR><BR> Indian Health Care Resource Center is an urban Indian clinic providing services to the Tulsa metro area. We are seeing high numbers of childhood obesity cases, as is typical of most Indian clinics. In our youth ages 5 - 12, 30% are above the 85th percentile on BMI for age. Of the youth ages 13 - 18, 35% are above the 85th percentile on BMI for age. Based on this need, we have established several youth programs designed to combat the childhood obesity problem in hopes of reducing future cases of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.<BR><BR>Indian Health Care Resource Center provides After School Programs for two schools located about three miles apart. Although they are in different school districts, both schools have a high Indian population. Our mission in these schools is to provide a quality after school program that provides physical activity, nutrition, and other positive health promotion messages.<BR><BR>Approximately 35 - 40 children participate at each after school program. Children receive a healthy snack when school is over. After snacks, the children have a free active play time. Then homework help time provides assistance in completing any school work for the next day. Next is activity time, which provides an hour of moderate to vigorous physical activity. Children typically have two or three activities from which to choose. <BR><BR>We use the CATCH (Coordinated Approach to Child Health) curriculum. This is an evidence based program designed to promote physical activity and healthy food choices, and prevent tobacco use in elementary school-aged children. By teaching children that eating healthy and being physically active every day can be fun, the CATCH Program has proven that establishing healthy habits in childhood can promote behavior changes that can last a lifetime. Our health educator presents a special CATCH lesson once each week at each school. Our dietitian presents a special nutrition lesson once each week at each school. Our tobacco health educator presents a tobacco prevention/education message at each school once a week. One day each week, the children learn about traditional Indian culture. The remainder of the week, the staff continues the focus on positive health messages.<BR><BR>In addition to CATCH, we also use experiential learning activities to help the children retain what they have learned. Experiential learning is an exciting, captivating method of teaching, great for both youth and adults. It involves learning through our experiences, and applying what we learn to our life experiences. It engages the participants, giving them an active role in learning, and it is fun! The best part is that people learn better & retain the information. We might remember only 10% of what we hear, but 90% of what we do. The result is much more effective learning - learning that will last a lifetime. The experiential learning activities teach nutrition and fitness concepts and are excellent for reinforcing the CATCH lessons.<BR><BR>Staffing for the after school program includes the following positions: Youth Program Coordinator, Health Educator, Tobacco Health Educator, Dietitian, and three Youth Activity Specialists.<BR><BR>Parents and teachers have both noticed improved behavior and classroom performance in the youth in the after school program. We are currently gathering information about the fitness levels and academic performance of the youth in the program to further validate the benefits of the program. Indian Health Care Resource Center Diabetes Management and CVD Risk Reduction http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8154281-D72E-AC4B-31E10D533D969083 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C8154281-D72E-AC4B-31E10D533D969083& GMT Diabetes-Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction Grant Program Using the Census 2000 Indian population (AI/AN primary race) of 29,316 for Tulsa County, IHCRC estimates that approximately 10% of this population has diabetes or about 3,000 American Indians. IHCRC serves a population base of over 86,000 American Indians (persons identifying as one or more races) who live in the five-county Tulsa MSA (2000 Census). IHCRC has analyzed its active Indian patient clinic population and found that 1169 (20%) of IHCRC patients age 19 and over are severely overweight, and 1944 (33%) are obese. Approximately 10% of overweight or obese adults also have diabetes diagnoses. Our 2007 diabetes chart audit indicated 625 active diabetic patients, compared to the first chart audit in 1998, which showed only 148 diabetic patients. The increasing number of diabetic patients indicates a rapidly growing chronic disease threat.<br><br>Our DM-CVD grant utilizes a case management approach, employing a counselor (LPC) as the case manager. The team also includes a dietitian and data coordinator. The concept of employing a counselor as a case manager occurred after the first nurse case manager resigned. We brainstormed to determine what our patients have in common, why they were not progressing, and what they really needed. We felt that a commonality among the patients was depression and family issues. These things prevented the patients from making their diabetes care a priority. At that point, we decided to hire a counselor as the case manager, in an effort to address these underlying issues.<br><br>Patients see the counselor/case manager and the dietitian for monthly appointments. Many patients have started to open up about their lives, and to be more honest about their lifestyle habits. This type of progress is difficult to monitor, as the lifestyle changes are coming slowly. We do feel strongly that over the course of time, the counselor as a case manager will be very beneficial to our patients in helping them get their lives in order, and slowly but surely make their diabetes care a priority. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D4A5-0738-5816-6DC30ABD175DA5E1 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D4A5-0738-5816-6DC30ABD175DA5E1& GMT Provides an incremental compilation of the current U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations and the supporting evidence that updates the recommendations contained in the Guide to Clinical Preventive Services, 2nd Edition. Contents of this looseleaf notebook will be released approximately twice each year, and a cumulative index will be released annually (AHRQ 02-500; $60 for the subscription, includes CD; or CD subscription alone) Raven's Way: Adolescent substance abuse treatment http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D707-DEFC-C123-F1DA2B687BB4E33D http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D707-DEFC-C123-F1DA2B687BB4E33D& GMT Raven’s Way serves Native and non-Native adolescents with primary diagnoses of substance abuse or dependence from the state of Alaska. A cohort model accepting ten students at a time, it incorporates traditional substance abuse treatment with experiential and wilderness based components. It includes a 14-20 day backpacking or kayaking expedition in Alaska rainforests on each course. Length of courses range from 37-45 days. Youth referred should be those who would benefit from a program that includes physical challenges, group cooperation, and team building. Since Raven’s Way is a voluntary program, participants must be willing to engage themselves in an intensive, substance-free treatment program. Pathways: Prevention of Obesity Among American Indian Schoolchildren http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D570-D73B-3EE0-3EA8136503466F19 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D570-D73B-3EE0-3EA8136503466F19& GMT Pathways was an eight-year obesity prevention program for American Indian schoolchildren in grades 3?5. The project involved 1,704 students in 41 schools in Arizona, South Dakota, Utah and New Mexico. With funding from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the project was developed and conducted through a partnership that included seven American Indian tribes—the Navajo Nation, the Gila River Indian Community, the Tohono O'odham Nation, the White Mountain Apache Tribe, the San Carlos Apache Tribe, the Oglala Lakota Nation, and the Sicangu Lakota Nation--and five Universities—Johns Hopkins University, the University of Arizona, the University of Minnesota, the University of New Mexico and the University of North Carolina. The Pathways obesity prevention project was developed with four components that should be implemented at the same time: a classroom curriculum, a family component, a food service component, and a physical activity component. The materials developed for each component are available for use by interested teachers, school personnel, and health promotion practitioners, by contacting the coordinator of the project, identified below, or by viewing the website for the Pathways curriculum. Keeping It REAL http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D6B9-CBAD-8D2C-7028DD839B9415A2 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D6B9-CBAD-8D2C-7028DD839B9415A2& GMT Keeping It REAL (refuse, explain, avoid, leave) is a culturally grounded, prevention intervention targeting substance use among urban middle-school children. The curriculum consists of 10 lessons promoting anti-drug norms and teaching resistance and other social skills, reinforced by booster activity and a media campaign. There were three versions based on population targeted: a Mexican-American-centered version; a Black/White version; and a multicultural version (developed by incorporating five lessons each from the first two versions). CASASTART http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D6C8-97CA-4A0D-2B9528A517B2283D http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D6C8-97CA-4A0D-2B9528A517B2283D& GMT CASASTART is a substance abuse and prevention program especially for children and families living in socially distressed areas. The specific objective of the program is to reduce children's use of illegal substance, to reduce delinquent behavior and to reduce the incidence of disruptive behavior in school. Muscogee Creek Nation Diabetes program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C815430E-F8EF-5E0F-E840A1E2356A29D6 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C815430E-F8EF-5E0F-E840A1E2356A29D6& GMT The Muscogee Creek Nation Diabetes program offered a Jump Rope club for the 4th – 8th grade students at Okemah Middle School and the 4th – 8th grade students at Mason School. The students were taught the alternative sport of jump rope as an individual and team activity. This program stresses daily exercise, diabetes prevention education, and the practice of jumping skills in an effort to prevent diabetes. The purpose of this club is to give the students another alternative to organized sports to stay active and healthy. The students traveled to different schools to demonstrate their jumping skills and to spark interest in jumping rope in the students from other schools. They also participated in the American Heart Associations’ Jump Rope for Heart. A local school volunteer was trained over the year and will be leading the program at each school in 07-08. This year, we will continue to support the Mason and Okemah programs with start up funding and we will start two new programs at Dewar and Ryal Schools. Pawnee Pediatric Asthma Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C815432D-D506-3646-FACFDD285739904F http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C815432D-D506-3646-FACFDD285739904F& GMT <ol> <li>Program was started with An original grant from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of $20,000. This grant was maintained into the years of 2006-2007 with additional awards of $30,000.</li> <li>Kids under 18 years of age. </li> <li>Asthma Register Database. </li> <li>Designated Pharmacist & Pediatrician. </li> <li>Asthma Clinic. </li> <li>Use of Pediatric Spacer Masks and Adult MDI spacers.</li> <li>Peak Flow Meters and Asthma Plans. </li> <li>Pediatric PC Based Spirometry in each Clinic Pediatric Room. </li> <li>Development of an Asthma PCC+</li> <li>Required use of IHS Patient Education Protocols and Codes (PEPC). </li> <li>Home Visit Referrals for Asthma Trigger Evaluation by our Office of Environmental Health . </li> <li>Asthma Home Trigger Abatement Funding. </li> <li>Education by a certified Asthma Educator RN/PHN. </li> <li>Collaboration with the Pawnee Tribe. Collaboration with the Barnsdal, Frontier, Pawhuska and Wynona School Districts.</li> </ol> <br><br> Target Population: Children, 17 yrs and younger. The Pawnee Indian Health Service Unit serves American Indian children from a 7 county area of Northeast Rural Oklahoma including the counties of Garfield, Grant, Kay, Noble, Osage, Payne and Pawnee. There are an estimated 5,000 Native American children in this area from the following tribes: Kaw, Osage, Otoe Missouria, Pawnee, Ponca, Sac & Fox and Tonkawa. The prevalence for Asthma in our service unit children is about 27%. <br><br> Project Evaluated: Yes, grant funding was maintained by the EPA. Clinic Visits for Pediatric Asthma increased from values of less than a 100 per month in 2005 to more than 200 a month by 2007. One month saw more than 300 Pediatric Asthma visits. Every Parent receives a written medication plan for their Asthmatic child. Asthma education is documented in the RPMS database. Before the Pediatrician came, less than 50 Asthma Educations was documented a month. Now in 2007 more than 150 educations are documented and one month saw more than 200 documented. Since the program started only 2-4% of our Asthmatic children have been uncontrolled. About 10 home evaluations have been done by our Office of Environmental Health. The Pawnee Tribe is collaborating with us to fix the home of these children with bad indoor air quality. Pawnee Service Unit Reach Out and Read Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C815434D-B07C-3D25-C49ADE0ADD3721B0 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C815434D-B07C-3D25-C49ADE0ADD3721B0& GMT The purpose of the Pawnee Service Unit’s Reach Out and Read Program is not about teaching our young Indian children to read early, but is about helping them to grow really motivated, loving books, associating books strongly with the pleasure of spending time with their parents. At the Pawnee Service Unit, when a child comes in for a Well Child Exam- the Pediatrician encourages reading and each child goes home with a new book. There are certain aspects of reading development that can be thought of as the literacy equivalent of a vaccination towards Health. The goal here is to promote Wellness and Family Attachment. The Pawnee Service Unit’s Reach Out and Read Program are based at both the Pawnee Indian Health Center and at the Pawhuska Indian Health Center. <br><br>According to a leading expert on Mental Health, John Bowlby, believes that for Good Health that it is essential for the infant and young child to experience a warm, intimate and continuous relationship with their mother (or permanent mother substitute). According to John Bowlby, with the comfort and security of a stable and routine attachment to the mother-or other primary caregiver- a child is able to organize other elements of development in a coherent way. In contrast, instability in the care-giving relationship—whether physical distance, erratic patterns of parental behavior, or even physical or emotional abuse—may interfere with the sense of trust and security, potentially giving rise to anxiety and psychological problems later in childhood or even decades later in life. The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study1has revealed that the roots of Medical Problems are from Childhood Psychological Trauma. The Ace Study has shown us that Adult Risk Behaviors such as smoking, overeating, substance abuse or promiscuity are often Masks for other Problems. As children witness multiple adult dysfunctions, they will cope by overeating, smoking, becoming promiscuous or using drugs and alcohol. This all leads to poor physical and mental health later in life. One way to foster attachment for our families is simply by supporting our reading program. We can help our children to grow up loving books & stories in a strong association with the pleasure of spending time with their parents and families. So far, our reading program has brought in more than $25,000 in funding or book donations and has given out more than 2,000 books. Program sustaining grants include 2 large book distributions from the First Book National Book Bank over the last 3 months.<br><br>References 1. The Ace Study. Conducted by Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program in San Diego, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Emory University in Atlanta, & University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in Tucson. <br><br> Target Population: Children, 17 yrs and younger. The Pawnee Indian Health Service Unit serves American Indian children from a 7 county area of Northeast Rural Oklahoma including the counties of Garfield, Grant, Kay, Noble, Osage, Payne and Pawnee. There are an estimated 5,000 Native American children in this area from the following tribes: Kaw, Osage, Otoe Missouria, Pawnee, Ponca, Sac & Fox and Tonkawa. 90% of our children age 5 years and less are from low income families according to our Medicaid data. In 1992 25.4% of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) students who should have graduated dropped-out of school--the highest percentage of all racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. (National Center for Education Statistics, 1994, p. 34). 34). In 1999, the Kids Count fact book reported the worst rate of Oklahoma children leaving school was in Pawnee County at 9.0%. Current, specific examples of our continuing problems in 2005 includes that our Wynona School District with a 16% drop-out rate and a 25% rate of students in Special Education. Dr. Englestead is the only Pediatrician for our Indian children for this 7 county area. He has created and has run our reading program here at the Pawnee Service Unit for the last 2 years. In our clinics, Dr. Englestead encourages reading during Well Child Exams and distributes new books. He has collaborations with our Indian Language Departments and 4 of our major School Districts. <br><br> Project Evaluated: Yes, number of books obtained, given. Number of Well Child Exams and Well Child Referrals. Currently Well Child visits are exceeding 300-400 a month. Well child referrals are now the predominate referral. Sickness referrals used to be the number 1 referral at the Pawnee Service Unit. Now- Well Child Referrals to Dietary, Dental, Optometry and to Audiology are the Number One type of Referrals. Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C815439B-E888-66F8-9379D114B8983C1D http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C815439B-E888-66F8-9379D114B8983C1D& GMT Specifically designed for inexperienced young paddlers, the comprehensive program prepared the youth mentally and physically for their own canoe Journey and traditional healing ceremony. Yakama Nation Native Americans “Speak Out” http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C81543CA-0B01-CC29-B8A23E721FF53DF1 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C81543CA-0B01-CC29-B8A23E721FF53DF1& GMT The SpeakOut Youth Initiative provides opportunities for youth (age 14-18) to gain leadership training, practice advocacy skills and receive recognition when the “SpeakOut” against Cancer. “Speak Out” Participants learn how to influence real world issues that make a difference in saving lives, through individual power and the spirit of working together. Yakama Nation Teens Against Tobacco USA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C81543E9-9491-7980-A3B3B362FDE5167A http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=C81543E9-9491-7980-A3B3B362FDE5167A& GMT Teens against tobacco USA is a peer education program in which middle school and high school students are trained to teach about the hazards of tobacco use to elementary school students. The TATU program has been adapted to reflect the role of traditional tobacco use in Native American Culture. TATU helps tribal and urban Indian youth prevent the abuse of tobacco in their communities. The Environmental Health Support Center http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D3FA-A030-596F-443AE6A658C46133 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D3FA-A030-596F-443AE6A658C46133& GMT The Environmental Health Support Center sponsors training courses on a wide variety of subjects related to the programs of the Indian Health Service's Office of Environmental Health and Engineering. Women’s Health on Wheels http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D467-A6E0-F9FA-E7331DA37A89AE96 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D467-A6E0-F9FA-E7331DA37A89AE96& GMT Unlike conventional X-ray mammography, which requires films to be processed and printed, digital mammography produces visual results that can be viewed by technologists at the mobile center and relayed immediately via satellite to experts at Walter Reed and Hopkins. Based on the expert readings, the women can be informed if they need additional tests or procedures, such as diagnostic mammography or breast biopsies, while they are still at the center, helping ensure they receive prompt, effective follow-up care. Another advantage of digital mammography is that it can reduce patient call-backs, an important consideration in remote or underserved areas. Call-backs occur when patients must return for imaging because of uncertainty over findings. With digital technology, doctors can enhance the digital image in a variety of ways with a computer, obtaining multiple views from a fewer number of images. As an added plus, digital mammography uses less radiation than conventional mammography. CDC Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E406-A0C3-4746-3ECCFF2FD420767C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E406-A0C3-4746-3ECCFF2FD420767C& GMT CDC's Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity (DNPA) takes a public health approach to address the role of nutrition and physical activity in improving the public's health and preventing and controlling chronic diseases. Active Living by Design http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E444-D510-EB9B-D4142DC47100B682 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E444-D510-EB9B-D4142DC47100B682& GMT This program establishes and evaluates innovative approaches to increase physical activity through community design, public policies and communications strategies. Domain areas include public health, parks/trails/greenways, land use, transportation and communication. Boys & Girls Club of America http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E464-EFEA-D8A3-4682C8B88793EEB2 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E464-EFEA-D8A3-4682C8B88793EEB2& GMT Boys & Girls Club of America's Mission is to inspire and enable all young people, especially those from disadvantaged circumstances, to realize their full potential as productive, responsible and caring citizens. US Soccer Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E473-9243-27A6-01BD4BA94FD09EED http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E473-9243-27A6-01BD4BA94FD09EED& GMT US Soccer Foundation's Mission is to enhance, assist, and grow the sport of soccer in the United States. 3 platform areas include field development, urban programming, and player development. CDC School Health Index http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E492-9AA5-AD18-4ED98A6E750253C1 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E492-9AA5-AD18-4ED98A6E750253C1& GMT CDC's SHI is a self-assessment and planning tool that will enable one to identify strengths and weaknesses of school's health promotion policies and programs; develop an action plan for improving school's health; and involve community in improving school' Health Focus of AARP.org http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E4B2-BAB4-BE57-6601B5A1F7F238BC http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E4B2-BAB4-BE57-6601B5A1F7F238BC& GMT AARP is dedicated to addressing the needs and interests of persons 50 and older. Through information and education, advocacy and service, AARP seek to enhance the quality of life for all by promoting independence, dignity and purpose. American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E52F-B5AF-90CF-F95E6F20E893C7CE http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E52F-B5AF-90CF-F95E6F20E893C7CE& GMT The AAPD is the membership organization representing the specialty of pediatric dentistry. Our 5,900 members serve as primary care providers for millions of children from infancy through adolescence; providing advanced, specialty-level care for infants, children, adolescents, and patients with special health care needs in private offices, clinics, and hospital settings. American Dental Association http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E53E-D87B-642B-B2BAAEADCA667768 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E53E-D87B-642B-B2BAAEADCA667768& GMT The ADA is the professional association of dentists committed to the public's oral health, ethics, science and professional advancement; leading a unified profession through initiatives in advocacy, education, research and the development of standards. American Dental Education Association http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E54E-AD6A-CB73-43E8B05C67C5B5EA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E54E-AD6A-CB73-43E8B05C67C5B5EA& GMT The mission of the ADEA is to lead individuals and institutions of the dental education community to address contemporary issues influencing education, research, and the delivery of oral health care for the improvement of the health of the public. American Academy of Pediatrics http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E55E-0B29-7566-8D4573BEA3628246 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E55E-0B29-7566-8D4573BEA3628246& GMT The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and its member pediatricians dedicate their efforts and resources to the health, safety and well-being of infants, children, adolescents and young adults. The AAP has approximately 57,000 members in the United States, Canada and Latin America. Dental Health Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E59C-FE91-AF66-286CC72611BBF6F6 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E59C-FE91-AF66-286CC72611BBF6F6& GMT The DHF works through community partnerships to promote oral health for all by providing leadership, advocacy, education, and public policy development, promoting community-based prevention strategies; encouraging the integration of oral health into total health and improving access to and the quality of oral health services. CDC Oral Health Resources http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E5AC-BE1F-7544-676066181D97FE9B http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E5AC-BE1F-7544-676066181D97FE9B& GMT CDC is the federal agency with primary responsibility for supporting state- and community-based programs to prevent oral disease, promoting oral health nationwide, and fostering applied research to enhance oral disease prevention in community settings. American College of Cardiology http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E5EA-B8A9-24B1-B6B096C7A388C4B9 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E5EA-B8A9-24B1-B6B096C7A388C4B9& GMT The mission of the American College of Cardiology is to advocate for quality cardiovascular care?through education, research promotion, development and application of standards and guidelines?and to influence health care policy. Community Tobacco Education and Prevention Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DDEC-EFEE-1219-CA04770A69494F60 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DDEC-EFEE-1219-CA04770A69494F60& GMT To improve the health and quality of life among all American Indians through education, prevention and cessation of tobacco abuse, while respecting traditional practices and ceremonies associated with tobacco use. Emergency Mental Health and Traumatic Stress http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DDFB-E325-E638-804FD94504788924 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DDFB-E325-E638-804FD94504788924& GMT The purpose of this program guidance is to acquaint the reader with the legislative basis for and operational mechanisms of the Crisis Counseling Assistance and Training Program (CCP) and its component functions. This guidance is a reference tool for public sector State and local mental health agencies and other Federal personnel unfamiliar with the CCP. Only a State or Federally-recognized Indian Tribe may apply for a crisis counseling grant. The State determines the need for crisis counseling services by compiling disaster data and conducting a mental health needs assessment of the Presidentially-declared area. Portland Area RPMS Training http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DE2A-CF13-90EC-7F351B3D6892AC1E http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DE2A-CF13-90EC-7F351B3D6892AC1E& GMT This course will provide an overview of the Behavioral Health System of the RPMS. The rationale for provider entry of patient data versus data entry by clerical staff will be discussed. Hands-on training will be provided using the different menu options for entering data into the RPMS system. Definitions of the different terms used for correctly coding data for statistical and billing purposes will be provided. The linkage between PCC and the Behavioral Health Module will be reviewed in relationship to concerns about patient confidentiality, statistical reporting, and billing. Options for generating and reviewing health summaries, visits, medications, and updating patient information will be exercised. A brief introduction to treatment planning and report generation will be included. Sonoma County Indian Health Project, Inc. http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D987-B389-270D-396AAB2796D5B8DC http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D987-B389-270D-396AAB2796D5B8DC& GMT Sonoma County Indian Health Project, Inc. (SCIHP) was established in 1971 by a group of visionary leaders from the Indian communities of Sonoma County. Their goals were to have a health center which would afford easy access to high quality care for all Indians of Sonoma County, and to provide such services in a manner which is sensitive to the culture and traditions of the local Indian people. Some of the programs specific for Native Elders are: Nutrition, and Community Health Services. They currently provide medical, dental, nutritional, and behavioral health services. Supportive services include a full-service pharmacy, health education, and community health/outreach services. SCIHP is established as a tribal organization under provisions of the Indian Self-Determination & Education Act, and as such, performs the functions of the Indian Health Service throughout their assigned area. SCIHP’s medical staff consists of three full-time physicians, a part-time consulting physician, Family Nurse Practitioner, nursing staff, and a Podiatrist. The dental staff consists of two full-time dentists, a part-time dentist, and a part-time orthodontist. The Behavioral Health staff is comprised of a Licensed Marriage, Family and Child Counselor, a Clinical Psychologist, two Social workers, and an Alcohol/Substance Abuse Counselor. SCHIP’s nutrition program staff consists of two Dietitians, a Nutrition Site Manager, a Senior Nutrition Aide, and a Senior Nutrition Cook, as well as a transportation specialist. The Community Health Services provide a wide range of outreach services to the Indian Community: hospital and nursing home visitations, home health care services, immunization follow-up visits, special care for the chronically ill, assistance with entitlement programs, case finding, communicable disease follow-up, community injury control, patient education, environmental health services, and limited transportation services for the elderly, and/or disabled. Elderly Service Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D9A6-FD17-CCB2-6CCDE7C4D0B68664 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D9A6-FD17-CCB2-6CCDE7C4D0B68664& GMT The primary goals of the Elderly Service Program are the coordination of access to needed supportive services, and the strengthening of community through Elders. Work is being done to reach the Elders who are not presently served by any other agency in the St. Paul East Metro area. Earthstar coordinates and provides transportation services to American Indian Elders for congregate dining, shopping, medical, and dental appointments, prescriptions, and the food shelf. Elders are assisted with crisis intervention and medications. Earthstar is working in conjunction with several other agencies to deliver culturally sensitive health care that will be accepted by Elders and providers. The assessment program attempts to ascertain Elders' unmet needs for services. It coordinates home chore services for Elders such as housekeeping, yard work, shopping, errands and other light chores provided by American Indian youth who are respectful of Elders. Earthstar organizes and arranges for Elders to make field trips to reservations, ceremonies, pow wows, leadership conferences, meetings and spiritual retreats. Craft supplies, bead work, basketry and materials, books, video tapes, and game equipment are available at Earthstar to be used by the Elders for intertribal and intergenerational educational programs. Also, the Native American Council of Elders/the Elders Circle discuss various issues with regard to strengthening the Elders circle, “Circle of Life.” The Elders play an extremely important part in completing this circle, since they have knowledge of traditions and can speak their native languages. Elders Lodge http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D9C6-A925-7AD3-2050330507F61DDC http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D9C6-A925-7AD3-2050330507F61DDC& GMT The Elders Lodge is viewed as a center of wisdom, warmth and strength in the Native American community. Traditionally, Elders maintain a special position in the tribe. To be a Native American Elder is to be respected, revered and to be honored. The roles of these special people were to teach, to carry on the ways of the people, to pass on oral tradition, to be a consultant on the ways of spirituality, philosophy, medicine, healing, peace, war and survival. The Lodge is nestled in a natural setting within a circle of trees as in the circle of life in which one lives. The landscape emphasizes the four seasons. These ideas are carried into the community ceremonial room and to the apartments for the Elders. The Elders Lodge will have 42 one bedroom apartments in a three story brick building. The Lodge will provide congregate dining in the community room, a full service kitchen, areas for fitness, health screening, crafts, sewing, meetings, library resources and laundry. The community room will serve as a center for ceremonies and activities centered around the Elders, their knowledge and desire to pass on cultural traditions and values to their children and grandchildren. The Elders Lodge will be marketed to Native American Elders but will be open to all seniors. The Lodge will operate under HUD Section 202 with Section 8 Rent subsidy. Native American Ethnobotany http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DD50-BD84-B041-9D1114EB1740274E http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DD50-BD84-B041-9D1114EB1740274E& GMT A Database of Foods, Drugs, Dyes and Fibers of Native American Peoples, Derived from Plants. Wisdom Steps: Preventive Health Services for Native American Seniors http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D9F4-D2AC-DF61-A3CB1610A659C1F2 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7D9F4-D2AC-DF61-A3CB1610A659C1F2& GMT The Wisdom Steps Program was awarded the National Indian Council on Aging's Patrick Stenger Award for excellence and innovation in elder care programs at the NICOA 2000 Conference. The program is also one of 12 programs within the United States and Canada to receive a 2000 SHARE Award. The SHARE Awards are designed to enhance the health and well being of culturally diverse elders by promoting culturally appropriate and competent approaches that improve health care access and delivery. The program is a partnership between 11 Minnesota tribes, several urban Indian programs and the Minnesota Board on Aging. The program encourages Minnesota elders to take steps toward improving their health by participating in health screenings, attending a health education class, setting goals to improve their health and promotes regularly exercise. Elders are honored at a Wisdom Steps feast yearly. To participate in Minnesota's Wisdom Steps please contact your tribe’s elder Indian program, tribal health service or elder center. Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DA23-A1BE-358F-14F7EC1A20F30A48 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DA23-A1BE-358F-14F7EC1A20F30A48& GMT Grants and contracts for TA, demonstration projects, research, and information dissemination HRSA Materna Child Health Bureau http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DA43-A356-8746-9BD83B04EE0519CF http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DA43-A356-8746-9BD83B04EE0519CF& GMT (1) Developing innovative uses of communications technologies and the use of new communications technology; (2) developing model curricula for training emergency medical services personnel, including first responders, emergency medical technicians, emergency nurses and physicians, and paramedics; (a) In the assessment, stabilization, treatment preparation for transport, and resuscitation of seriously injured patients, with special attention to problems that arise during long transport and to methods of minimizing delays in transport to the appropriate facility; and (b) in the management of the operation of the emergency medical services system; (3) making training for original certification, and continuing education, in the provision and management of emergency medical services more accessible to emergency medical personnel in rural areas through telecommunications, home studies, providing teachers and training at locations accessible to such personnel, and other methods; (4) developing innovative protocols and agreements to increase access to pre-hospital care and equipment necessary for the transportation of seriously injured patients to the appropriate facilities; and (5) evaluating the effectiveness of protocols with respect to emergency medical services and systems. Kimaw Medical Center's Office of Tribal Injury & Violence Prevention Programs http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DACF-BDA6-E3AD-42F6FDCEE2D963D2 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7DACF-BDA6-E3AD-42F6FDCEE2D963D2& GMT The Kimaw Medical Center's Office of Tribal Injury & Violence Prevention Programs coordinate various existing injury prevention focused community programs, institutions and agencies in injury prevention activities, events and campaigns. Our goal is to reduce injuries involving tribal adults and minors while “driving under the influence,” non-use of safety restraints in motor vehicular crashes, and domestic violence injuries related to alcohol and other drug related problems. The Tribal Injury & Prevention Program will document injuries by use of computerized tracking system for specific types of injury trends for injury prevention surveillance. We provide injury prevention incentives, training and utilizing media resources to reduce incidence of injuries through public education legislation, enforcement, and community support. RWJF Local Partnership Funding http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EFDC-AF5D-B40D-D6EBD9283BEC2776 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EFDC-AF5D-B40D-D6EBD9283BEC2776& GMT Local Initiative Funding Partners is a partnership program between RWJF and local grantmakers that supports innovative, community-based projects to improve the health and health care for society's most vulnerable people. Leadership for Healthy Communities http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EFFC-0CC1-5E24-0F7064F8E45FA73C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EFFC-0CC1-5E24-0F7064F8E45FA73C& GMT Program to increase the number of state and local elected and appointed leaders who understand and champion community design to promote active living. The Obesity Society http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F00B-C6C0-429C-2ACD0C9F5951D8A8 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F00B-C6C0-429C-2ACD0C9F5951D8A8& GMT The American Obesity Association is the only obesity organization focused on changing public policy and perceptions about obesity. In only a few years AOA has become an authoritative source for policy makers, media, professionals and patients on the obesity epidemic. In this period of time they have established an impressive record of changing federal policy. Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F03A-B14B-B687-638B00A45396086B http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F03A-B14B-B687-638B00A45396086B& GMT CDC's Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity (DNPA) takes a public health approach to address the role of nutrition and physical activity in improving the public's health and preventing and controlling chronic diseases. The scope of DNPA activities includes epidemiological and behavioral research, surveillance, training and education, intervention development, health promotion and leadership, policy and environmental change, communication and social marketing, and partnership development. Fundraising and Grant writing Resources http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F115-C7CB-A88E-0F4E77E4026C775F http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F115-C7CB-A88E-0F4E77E4026C775F& GMT Various resources that provide assistance in grant writing Arthur Blank Family Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F124-F9C2-D837-FB68D2740E523EAB http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F124-F9C2-D837-FB68D2740E523EAB& GMT The Foundation provides funding for projects, operating and advocacy in the following priority areas: Arts and Culture, Athletics and Outdoor Activities, Environment, Fostering Understanding, Helping Adolescents Learn, Young Women and Girls. The Foundation's geographic focus includes: The State of Georgia, Coastal South Carolina, New York, New York, Boston, Massachusetts, Los Angeles, California. Cottonwood Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F153-0336-E2C1-7F77ED6754339782 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F153-0336-E2C1-7F77ED6754339782& GMT The foundation focuses its funding on committed, grassroots organizations that rely strongly on volunteer efforts and where foundation support will make a significant difference. The foundation has very limited amount of funding available and will only award grants to organizations that meet all four of the following criteria: protect the environment, promote cultural diversity, empower people to meet their basic needs, and rely on volunteer efforts. Jessie B. Cox Charitable Lead Trust http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F163-00B5-CB80-F96C425BAD43C8CA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F163-00B5-CB80-F96C425BAD43C8CA& GMT The Trust is interested in supporting environmental projects which will have a positive impact on: protection of critical natural resources; energy conservation; public awareness of the critical environmental issues facing the region; and protection of the public's health, especially in low- income or minority communities. Edison International: Community Involvement http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F172-F0C0-91D9-5E302954B10A1FE7 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F172-F0C0-91D9-5E302954B10A1FE7& GMT Edison International supports nonprofit, 501(c) 3, tax-exempt organizations that strive to maintain or improve the quality of life in the community and address specific community needs. While we support a broad cross-section of community organizations, activities, and interests, our primary areas of support are education, the environment, and economic development. Environmental Grantmakers Association (EGA) http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F192-BD15-DFCF-CD7ADD2B11C17E4C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F192-BD15-DFCF-CD7ADD2B11C17E4C& GMT The EGA now exists as a voluntary association of foundations and giving programs concerned with the protection of the natural environment. Great Lakes Protection Fund http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F1A1-D16D-7497-047154C5D2B2C1EE http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F1A1-D16D-7497-047154C5D2B2C1EE& GMT The Great Lakes Protection Fund is a private, nonprofit corporation formed in 1989 by the Governors of the Great Lakes States. It is a permanent environmental endowment that supports collaborative actions to improve the health of the Great Lakes ecosystem Wilburforce Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F1C1-F849-1566-950E48DF35284F1B http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F1C1-F849-1566-950E48DF35284F1B& GMT Wilburforce Foundation is a private, philanthropic foundation that funds environmental issues in the Western U.S. and Western Canada. Begun in 1991, the Foundation awards grants to nonprofit organizations that have programs operating in Alaska, the Yellowstone to Yukon region, British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, Utah, Arizona or New Mexico. We have two offices: our main office is in the Fremont neighborhood, just north of Lake Union, in Seattle, Washington, and our Yellowstone to Yukon office is in Bozeman, Montana. Robert and Patricia Switzer Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F1EF-D69C-0EA4-E9516F6D6AF08C30 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F1EF-D69C-0EA4-E9516F6D6AF08C30& GMT Our mission is to identify groups or organizations who have the ability and determination to make a significant environmental impact and to support projects which will have direct, early and measurable results in improving the quality of our natural environment Diabetes Action Research and Education Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F23E-0697-E507-9DB8493F1D9CD438 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F23E-0697-E507-9DB8493F1D9CD438& GMT The Diabetes Action Research and Education Foundation is organized to enhance the quality of life for all people whose lives are affected by diabetes and its complications. The Foundation is focused on reducing the serious medical consequences of diabetes USDA Nutrition Assistance Programs http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F25D-C719-9524-4848F8BF625A1BB3 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F25D-C719-9524-4848F8BF625A1BB3& GMT Food and Nutrition Service increases food security and reduces hunger in partnership with cooperating organizations by providing children and low-income people access to food, a healthful diet, and nutrition education in a manner that supports American agriculture and inspires public confidence. SPARK PE - Grant Resources http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F2AB-C931-4175-A7ACB0E8F7E7C283 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F2AB-C931-4175-A7ACB0E8F7E7C283& GMT Consortium of Funding Organizations focused on combating Obesity with Physical Activity Advocates for Youth http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F337-C737-ED43-1F805B342B53438C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F337-C737-ED43-1F805B342B53438C& GMT Advocates for Youth is dedicated to creating programs and advocating for policies that help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their reproductive and sexual health. Advocates provides information, training, and strategic assistance to youth-serving organizations, policy makers, youth activists, and the media in the United States and the developing world. Planned Parenthood http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F347-0693-0127-52D55D5F4766B651 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F347-0693-0127-52D55D5F4766B651& GMT Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc., is the world's largest and most trusted voluntary reproductive health care organization. Founded by Margaret Sanger in 1916 as America's first birth control clinic, Planned Parenthood believes in everyone's right to choose when or whether to have a child, that every child should be wanted and loved, and that women should be in charge of their own destinies. Maternal Child Health Bureau - Abstinence Education http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F3B4-E6CC-8DD9-E4A4AA07D17245D5 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F3B4-E6CC-8DD9-E4A4AA07D17245D5& GMT State Section 510 Program Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F3D4-FA15-C66E-3418F23B5EE591EC http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F3D4-FA15-C66E-3418F23B5EE591EC& GMT Planned Parenthood's Boys2Men program partners with St. Louis City youth-serving organizations like Herbert Hoover Boys and Girls Club, and various social services organizations as well as area churches and schools, to hold "Boys2Men" classes. This multi-week course covers a range of topics, including the changes that affect young men’s bodies during puberty, levels of intimacy in relationships, communications skills, healthy decision making and medically accurate sex education. As an added incentive, the participants are paid to attend the classes, earning $5.15 an hour for the duration of the 36-hour course. Health Policy Guide http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F3F3-AF88-6B06-8CB6F567AC826B82 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F3F3-AF88-6B06-8CB6F567AC826B82& GMT Health Policy Guide provides evidence-based, peer-reviewed policy guidance and resources to support advocacy and decision-making at the state and local levels Dept. of Ed Technology Funds http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F422-BE41-85D4-3AAED2851AE459BD http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F422-BE41-85D4-3AAED2851AE459BD& GMT Coordination funds are used to carry out activities to improve the interstate and intrastate coordination of migrant education between state and local education agencies. Projects that improve the teaching and learning for migrant students through the use of technology are encouraged. ERE Funding Opportunities http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F460-0434-CBCA-BEFA2BB3304CB324 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F460-0434-CBCA-BEFA2BB3304CB324& GMT NSF has supported activities associated with environmental research and education for decades, primarily through disciplinary programs.A cornerstone of NSF programs is the integration of research and education. Most research projects have educational components targeted at students and teachers at all levels and the general public. In addition, NSF supports many programs whose central focus is education. Examples of those that have an environmental concentration include the Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship program, the Math and Science Partnership program, the Digital Libraries Initiative, and the Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement program Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Healthy Nations Initiative http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F71F-D521-282E-452A3AA3FD37AF3B http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F71F-D521-282E-452A3AA3FD37AF3B& GMT The Healthy Nations Initiative is funded by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to help Native Americans reduce the harm caused by substance abuse in their communities. The goal of the initiative is to demonstrate that tribes and communities can, over time, achieve substantial reductions in the demand for -- and consequently the use of -- alcohol and other harmful substances, including tobacco and illegal drugs. The initiative provides funding to 14 tribes and organizations to support the development of community-wide efforts to combat substance abuse that integrate public awareness campaigns, prevention programs, and services for treatment, aftercare, and support. Particular emphasis is on prevention and early intervention with respect to the use of alcohol, illegal drugs and tobacco among youth. Incorporation of traditional cultural values is a key component of the Healthy Nations Initiative The McKnight Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F74E-BEE3-F6CA-E4D64304295C95B0 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F74E-BEE3-F6CA-E4D64304295C95B0& GMT The McKnight Foundation: Supports efforts to strengthen communities, families, and individuals, particularly those in need. Contributes to the arts, encourages preservation of our natural environment, and promoted research in selected fields. Continually explore innovative ideas to advance our goals in partnership with those we serve. Child Development Project http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F76D-FF08-7C96-02F4459D3328E3EA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F76D-FF08-7C96-02F4459D3328E3EA& GMT The Child Development Project (CDP) is a multifaceted, schoolwide improvement program that helps elementary schools become "caring communities of learners" for their students (5 to 12 years old). CDP significantly reduces children's early use of alcohol and marijuana and their involvement in violence-related behavior. CDP is designed to strengthen connections among peers and between students of different ages, teachers and students, and home and school, in order to promote: (1) School bonding: students commitment to, and engagement in, their school (2) Students interpersonal skills and commitment to positive values (3) Classroom and school-wide climate of safety, respect, caring, and helpfulness. The program, which involves students in all grade levels, their families, teachers, and school administrators, prepares children to play responsible roles in their classrooms and schools so that later they can contribute to the wider society. The program has recently been streamlined and strengthened to make it more feasible and affordable to implement, and more effective at boosting literacy skills. Olweus Bullying Prevention Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F78D-9FB0-4F8B-7ADE80EEF3FAE0EE http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F78D-9FB0-4F8B-7ADE80EEF3FAE0EE& GMT Olweus Bullying Prevention is a multilevel, multicomponent school-based program designed to prevent or reduce bullying in elementary, middle, and junior high schools (students 6 to 15 years). The program attempts to restructure the existing school environment to reduce opportunities and rewards for bullying. School staff is largely responsible for introducing and implementing the program. Their efforts are directed toward improving peer relations and making the school a safe and positive place for students to learn and develop. While intervention against bullying is particularly important to reduce the suffering of the victims, it is also highly desirable to counteract these tendencies for the sake of the aggressive student, as bullies are much more likely than other students to expand their antisocial behaviors. Research shows that reducing aggressive, antisocial behavior may also reduce substance use and abuse. Drinking and Driving-Blood Alcohol Concentration http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F7FA-E0B6-9018-C33EDC7D8A8E754A http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F7FA-E0B6-9018-C33EDC7D8A8E754A& GMT These are laws that lower the blood alcohol concentration at which it is illegal to drive a motor vehicle from 0.10 g/dL to 0.08 g/dL (0.08%). This intervention is effective in reducing fatal, alcohol-related crashes and is strongly recommended based on scientific evidence. Child Saftey Seat Laws http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F809-B2C1-036E-0B93185801A95030 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F809-B2C1-036E-0B93185801A95030& GMT These are enforced laws requiring infants and young children traveling in motor vehicles to be restrained in federally approved child safety seats appropriate for the child's age and size. This intervention is effective in increasing child safety seat use and reducing fatal and nonfatal injuries. This intervention is strongly reccomended based on scientific evidence. Targeted enforcement of safety belt laws http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F819-0367-26CE-8E9A30C63FF130CA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F819-0367-26CE-8E9A30C63FF130CA& GMT Increased enforcement at specific locations and times to target violations of safety belt laws are combined with media campaigns that publicize the enforcement activity. This intervention is effective in increasing safety belt use and reducing fatal injuries. This intervention is strongly recommended based on scientific evidence. Family Violence Prevention Fund http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F829-C9C3-A333-FD9420902B8D1045 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F829-C9C3-A333-FD9420902B8D1045& GMT Through collaboration with one another and with experts in community-based health care delivery and domestic violence, the pilot sites will develop culturally appropriate prevention strategies and resources for health care providers and victims. The sites also will increase awareness of domestic violence as a public health issue, promoting public education and outreach within Native communities. The pilot sites will serve as models to other AI/AN clinics and hospitals across the country. The materials created by the sites will be distributed to other I/T/U facilities. Resources and protocol developed by the Pilot Project will be available to other facilities, and Project members can provide training or technical support to health care providers at other clinics. Laws to reduce legal Blood Alcohol Concentration http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F838-C0EE-8CDD-ED46B7EFF7AC9755 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F838-C0EE-8CDD-ED46B7EFF7AC9755& GMT These laws establish a separate, lower blood alcohol concentration at which it is illegal to drive a motor vehicle for drivers targeted by the law. The target population is newly licensed drivers or drivers under a specified age. This intervention is effective in reducing overall crash rates, crash injuries and fatal alcohol-related crashes. It is recommended based on scientific evidence. Child Safety Seat Laws http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F858-9AB5-9DD4-3AC968AA8AACA0A3 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F858-9AB5-9DD4-3AC968AA8AACA0A3& GMT These are laws that require the use of safety belts by motor-vehicle occupants not covered by existing child safety seat laws. This intervention is effective in increasing safety belt use and reducing fatal and non-fatal injuries. This intervention is strongly recommended based on scientific evidence. Sleep Safe Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F867-0D6B-D0AC-582A4364823022A2 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F867-0D6B-D0AC-582A4364823022A2& GMT The goal of the sleep safe program is to reduce the rate of fire and burn injuries among AI/AN children ages 0-5 enrolled in Tribal Head Start Centers participating in the Sleep Safe Program. The Sleep Safe Program incorporates: (1) a curriculum consisting of 9 guides; (2) provision and installation of smoke alarms in homes needing them. Sobriety Checkpoints http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F877-B2FF-3B53-11ED9BD0F44EFAEA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F877-B2FF-3B53-11ED9BD0F44EFAEA& GMT Two types of sobriety checkpoints have proven to be equally effective. Random breath testing checkpoints are when all drivers are stopped and given breath tests for blood alcohol levels. Selective breath testing checkpoints are when police must have reason to suspect the driver has been drinking before administering the breath test. An important component for sobriety checkpoints are media campaigns that publicize the enforcement activity. These interventions are effective in reducing overall crash rates as well as fatal and nonfatal injuries related to motor vehicle crashes. They are strongly recommended based on scientific evidence. Primary Seat Belt Law http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F896-F30E-E402-BAA53C418A6C746B http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F896-F30E-E402-BAA53C418A6C746B& GMT These are primary enforcement laws that allow a police officer to stop a vehicle solely for an observed belt law violation (without having other reasons to stop the vehicle). This intervention is effective in increasing safety belt use and reducing fatal injuries. This intervention is strongly recommended based on scientific evidence. Ride Safe http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F8F4-0763-46DA-68858331353C3018 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F8F4-0763-46DA-68858331353C3018& GMT Ride Safe aims to reduce the rate of motor vehicle related injuries to children, aged 3 to 5 years, enrolled in participating Tribal Head Start programs, by promoting motor vehicle child restraint use. The Ride Safe Program training module includes eight guides; each guide includes activities for a specific group within the Tribal community.The Ride Safe Program will achieve its overall goal by meeting the following objectives: 1. Provide funding and support for at least one Tribal Head Start Center staff member to complete the National Highway Traffic (NHTSA) Child Passenger Safety (CPS) technician training. 2. Provide a one to two-day CPS training for all Head Start staff who participate in Ride Safe activities. 3. Educate parents and childcare providers about proper and age-appropriate child restraint use. 4. Distribute to parents and care givers one car seat or booster seat for each child at a Head Start Center that implements the Ride Safe Program. 5. Conduct follow-up home visits to educate parents and other caregivers about proper car seat use and to reinforce positive child passenger safety messages. 6. Gather community child restraint use data. 7. Promote community awareness about how to lessen the severity of motor vehicle crash injuries through car seat use. Indian Health Service (IHS) Injury Prevention Program website http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F923-F0D9-B663-E33BB513CF9A0672 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F923-F0D9-B663-E33BB513CF9A0672& GMT Is dedicated to improving the lives and reducing the toll of injuries in the communities we serve. This is accomplished by assisting tribes in developing their own capacity to address injury using an integrated approach: environmental modification, education, and enforcement. The following are examples of the many services and resources which our program provides: Program and Project Development, Data, Resources, Training, and Coalitions. Safe Kids Worldwide http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F971-F35F-FBA0-E0A219AC745E57FD http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7F971-F35F-FBA0-E0A219AC745E57FD& GMT Dedicated solely to the prevention of unintentional childhood injury — the number one killer of children ages 14 and under. These programs, involving media events, device distribution and hands-on educational activities for kids and their families, aim to get communities across the country more involved in the safety of their children. SMART Team http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FA1D-D4CF-61A0-7CE926402F42CD73 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FA1D-D4CF-61A0-7CE926402F42CD73& GMT SMART Team is an eight-module, multimedia software program designed to teach violence prevention messages and methods to students in grades six through nine (11 to 15 years old). National Native American AIDS Prevention Center's http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FA9A-EA99-6A30-C5BFE0E416B4D20B http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FA9A-EA99-6A30-C5BFE0E416B4D20B& GMT The National Native American AIDS Prevention Center's (NNAAPC) mission is to stop the spread of HIV and related diseases among American Indians, Alaskan Natives, Native Hawaiians, and to improve the quality of life for those infected and affected by HIV/AIDS. VOICES/VOCES: Video Opportunities for Innovative Condom Education and Safer Sex http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FB65-CA05-4735-D93473CEEB4E0A9A http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FB65-CA05-4735-D93473CEEB4E0A9A& GMT VOICES/VOCES is a single-session, video-based HIV/STD prevention program designed to encourage condom use and improve condom negotiation skills. The program is based on the theory of reasoned action, which explains how behaviors are guided by attitudes, beliefs, experiences, and expectations of other persons’ reactions. The Teen Outreach Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FC10-D15A-9611-B01437A4D8678136 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FC10-D15A-9611-B01437A4D8678136& GMT The Teen Outreach Program (TOP) is a broad, developmental intervention that attempts to help teens understand and evaluate their life options. The program is designed to prevent problem behaviors in adolescents. It is predicated on the notion that a heightened awareness of life options, increased knowledge of those options and how to effectively pursue them, and enhanced and diverse experiences with various life options will lead to a variety of positive outcomes, primarily scholastic success as measured by reduced course failure and suspension rates and a decrease in pregnancy rates. Reducing the Risk curriculum http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FC20-DD2D-1F94-A26F907FF4026480 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FC20-DD2D-1F94-A26F907FF4026480& GMT The Reducing the Risk curriculum was developed in 1988 to help lower the rate of teenage pregnancy and exposure to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The school-based curriculum helps teens understand the personal responsibilities and consequences of sexual activity and develop and practice the decision-making, negotiating, and refusal skills needed to resist negative social pressures regarding sexual contact. In addition, the program aims to strengthen parent-child communication about issues related to sexual activity. Girls, Inc. http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FC3F-A1D3-0596-E6309472A9844C1F http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FC3F-A1D3-0596-E6309472A9844C1F& GMT The Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy program of Girls Incorporated is an age-phased, informal and interactive sexuality education program that advocates abstinence and provides accurate information about pregnancy, risky behaviors, contraception, and protection. It is based on developmental stages as well as research on girls and their sexual decisions. The goal is for girls to “own the discovery” on information and action. Alaska Native Health Board Trampling tobacco Project http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FC4F-F791-704C-A6DF592E1C181C4C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FC4F-F791-704C-A6DF592E1C181C4C& GMT The purpose of the Trampling tobacco Project is to reduce the addiction, disease and death caused by tobacco use in Alaska. Goals: Protect the public health of rural and urban Alaskans by raising awareness of the harm caused by tobacco use. Prevent initiation of tobacco products by children. Promote tobacco cessation among youth and adults. Support policies which protect nonsmokers from secondhand smoke. Develop resources and tools for rural communities to assist their tobacco prevention efforts. CDC Community Guide: Tobacco Interventions http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FC6E-F356-3EEB-FE736972A8262522 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FC6E-F356-3EEB-FE736972A8262522& GMT Mass media interventions are long-term, high-intensity counter advertising campaigns. They are effective in motivating children and adolescents to remain tobacco free. These campaigns are also effective in motivating adult tobacco users to quit. Effective in combination with other interventions (i.e. tobacco price increases, school and community based education). Strongly recommended based on scientific evidence. Menendez Foundation - Leading Prevention Eduation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FCEB-DF4F-97E1-E537E77D94E93B69 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FCEB-DF4F-97E1-E537E77D94E93B69& GMT TGFD is a school-based prevention program that aims to reduce the intention of middle and high school students to use alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drugs. The program is designed to develop: (1) personal and interpersonal skills relating to alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drugs (2) appropriate attitudes towards alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drug use (3) knowledge of negative consequences (4) positive peer norms. The program also encourages students to bond with pro-social peers. Kick Butts Day: Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FCFB-9FCE-B1C5-1113F61605D5195C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FCFB-9FCE-B1C5-1113F61605D5195C& GMT Manual contains an annual kit distributed by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. The annual event is designed to mobilize youth advocates across the country to publicly take a stand against the big tobacco industry. Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FD0A-99FF-40A1-484162E2217CF304 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FD0A-99FF-40A1-484162E2217CF304& GMT Campaign is one of the nation's largest non-governmental initiatives to protect children from tobacco addiction & exposure to secondhand smoke. American Cancer Society: Tobacco Use Prevention Youth Toolkit http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FD1A-C650-9E1A-033E913FD04E00A2 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FD1A-C650-9E1A-033E913FD04E00A2& GMT “A Resource Guide to Youth Tobacco Cessation Programs”—Developed by the American Cancer Society, with the assistance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Cancer Institute, this guide is a compilation of youth tobacco cessation programs currently being utilized around the country. The guide is meant to serve as a working tool that will provide tobacco abuse prevention personnel with information and resources to better support those in their communities who are tackling the difficult problem of youth tobacco abuse. Includes evaluation and focus group results. Indigenous Peoples Task Force http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FD39-CB43-10D7-15972A0B9FD3962A http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FD39-CB43-10D7-15972A0B9FD3962A& GMT Created in collaboration with students and community members from the Zuni Pueblo and the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, this curriculum addresses key issues in the American Indian adolescent's lives and teaches such life skills as communication, problem solving, depression and stress management, anger regulation, and goal setting using a skills-based approach. Hazelden Addition Treatment Centers http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FD58-C8B9-BFD4-1B7EA4EB5F1295BF http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FD58-C8B9-BFD4-1B7EA4EB5F1295BF& GMT A six-session peer led program based on Bandura's theory of social learning. It engages students in brainstorming creative, effective tobacco use prevention strategies. Includes a discussion of cessation. Stop Teenage Addiction to Tobacco http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FDB6-C046-7721-457B97B0DCD0C8D6 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FDB6-C046-7721-457B97B0DCD0C8D6& GMT The S.T.A.T. initiative is an environmental campaign to enforce laws against tobacco use by minors and to stimulate communities to implement other strategies such as banning vending machines or installing lockout devices on vending machines to curtail youth access to tobacco. Where traditional youth smoking prevention initiatives have focused on reducing the demand or desire for tobacco among youth, the S.T.A.T. effort focuses on cutting off the supply of tobacco to minors. The town of Woodridge, Illinois, was the first in the Nation to put a tough enforcement program in place. The aim of the program was to convince merchants to obey the law by refusing to sell tobacco to minors. As a result of this enforcement program, Woodridge’s rate of tobacco use among teenagers was reduced by half. Prevention, Intervention, Treatment, Recovery http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FDD5-D52D-F3B7-6E25EC1BF13ECCA3 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FDD5-D52D-F3B7-6E25EC1BF13ECCA3& GMT The primary goal of this prevention approach is to decrease child and adolescent exposure to tobacco promotion and pro-tobacco influences. Activities: (1) Provide media advocacy and the threat of adverse publicity through protesting events sponsored by the tobacco industry (2) Assist event promoters by providing alternative, nontobacco funding (3) Develop policies that ban tobacco industry sponsorship of sporting and cultural events (4) Promote tobacco-free events (5) Develop tobacco-free messages and embed them in sports education (6) Advertise tobacco-free events (7) Include tobacco-free messages in the event’s promotional materials. Tobacco-Free Environment Policies http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FDE5-DF90-7B2F-3ABDD063266091E5 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FDE5-DF90-7B2F-3ABDD063266091E5& GMT The primary goal of tobacco-free environmental policies is to create environments that do not expose youth to the use and possession of tobacco. Activities: (1) Review existing laws and compliance with laws restricting tobacco use in certain settings (2) Review the effects of antismoking school policies on adolescent smoking (3) Provide technical assistance and guidance on developing and implementing tobacco-free policies and environments (4) Educate and inform concerned parties about laws restricting tobacco use in certain settings. Wingspan http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FE14-F262-5748-413EFEE303D1999E http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FE14-F262-5748-413EFEE303D1999E& GMT Al's Pals: Kids Making Health Choices is a resiliency based early childhood curriculum and teacher training program that develops personal, social, and emotional skills in children 3 to 8 years old. Using 46 interactive lessons, this program teaches children how to: 1) Express feelings appropriately 2) Use kind words 3) Care about others 4) Use self-control 5) Think independently 6) Accept differences 7) Make Friends 8) Solve problems peacefully 9) Cope 10) Make safe and healthy choices, and 11) Understand that tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs are not for children. The lessons use guided creative play, and brainstorming to develop children's social emotional competence and life skills. A nine lesson booster curriculum is used in second or third grade with children who have previously received the full program. Athletes Training & Learning to Avoid Steroids http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FE24-9F1C-55F0-812598CB60E33BB2 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FE24-9F1C-55F0-812598CB60E33BB2& GMT ATLAS (Athletes Training and Learning to Avoid Steriods) is a multicomponent school based program for male high school athletes 13 to 19 years old. It capitalizes on team centered dynamics and uses positive peer pressure and role modeling to reduce the use of: 1) Anabolic steriods 2) Alcohol and other drugs, and 3) Performance enhancing supplements. This program is delivered to school sports team, with instruction led by student athlete peers and facilitated by coaches, ATLAS promotes healthy nutrition and excercise behaviors as alternatives to substance use. The 10 session curriculum is highly scripted and contains interactive and entertaining activities that make it easy and desirable to deliver, enhancing the fidelity of the intervention. The product of 10 years of research and field testing, ATLAS focuses specifically on adolescent male athletes' risk and positive factors. The Center for Family Studies http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FE81-01D6-02A6-5863868B4104C01D http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FE81-01D6-02A6-5863868B4104C01D& GMT Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) is an effective problem focused, and practical approach to the elimination of substance abuse risk factors. It successfully reduces problem behaviors in children and adolescents, 6 to 7 years, and strengthens their families. BSFT provides families with tools to decrease individual and family risk factors through focused interventions that improve problematic family relations and skill building strategies that strengthen families. It targets: 1) Conduct problems 2) Associations with anti- social peers 3) Early substance use, and 4) Problematic family relations. The program fosters parental leadership, appropriate parental involvement, mutual support among parenting figures, family communication, problem solving, clear rules and consequences, nurturing, and shared responsibility for family problems. In addition, the program provides specialized outreach strategies to bring families into therapy. Challenging College Alcohol Abuse http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FE91-C57C-0BAB-825B41777EB2DA09 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FE91-C57C-0BAB-825B41777EB2DA09& GMT Challenging College Alcohol Abuse (CCAA) is a social norms and environmental management program that reduces high risk drinking and related negative consequences in college students (18 to 24 years old). Under CCAA, the campus health services uses new and innovative methods to communicate public health information to students, the campus community, and the surrounding community to: 1) Correct misperceptions, increase knowledge, and change attitudes about alcohol and drug use behaviors among undergraduate students. 2) Change policies and practices related to alcohol and drug use and abuse among campus fraternity and sorority chapters. 3) Change faculty, administration, parental, community, and policymaker perceptions to prevent perpetuation of alcohol and drug myths. 4) Increase restrictions on alcohol availability and monitor on and off campus distribution and consumption. CCAA fosters development of policies that establish and maintain a healthy and safe environment for all students. It also seeks to develop community and civic partnerships and collaborations in support of campus alcohol and drug policies, and State and local laws. Effective Interactive Divorce Education Programs http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FEA1-A322-AE11-6B1AFDAF46B90779 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FEA1-A322-AE11-6B1AFDAF46B90779& GMT Children in the Middle is a skills based program that helps children and parents deal with the children's reactions to divorce. Divorcing parents may use their children to manipulate and/or control each other around a variety of personal, social, and financial issues. These tactics increase the stress and anxiety typically experienced by children of divorce and can increase children's risk for behavior problems, depression, delinquency, substance use, teen pregnancy, school failure and dropout, and suicide. Built around a 37 minute video for parents and a 30 minute video for children, children in the Middle needs no special training or licensing to implement and seeks to alleviate children's problems such as: 1) Loss of concentration and attention. 2) Declining grades and behavior problems at school. 3) Withdrawal from friends. 4) Emotional outbursts and health problems. 5) Serious anger with one or both parents. 6) Delinquency and substance use. The parent video teaches parents the skills needed to avoid putting children in the middle of their conflicts. The child video helps children understand why parents divorce and teaches children stress and anger management and problem solving skills. The parent video is available open caption. ALCOHOL EPIDEMIOLOGY PROGRAM http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FECF-94E1-DF31-F7CA84D40DD4A863 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FECF-94E1-DF31-F7CA84D40DD4A863& GMT Communities Mobilizing for Change on Alcohol (CMCA) is a community organizing program designed to reduce adolescent (13-20 years old) access to alcohol by changing community policies and practices. Initiated in 1991, CMCA has proven that effectively limiting the access to alcohol to people under the legal drinking age not only directly reduces a teen drinking, but also communicates a clear message to the community that underage drinking is inappropriate and unacceptable. CMCA employs a range of social organizing techniques to address legal, institutional, social, and health issues in order to reduce alcohol use by eliminating illegal alcohol sales to youth by retailers and obstructing the provision of alcohol to youth by adults. Prevention Research Center http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FEFE-E085-27DD-CD467B21A7E72ECC http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FEFE-E085-27DD-CD467B21A7E72ECC& GMT Community Trials to Reduce High-Risk Drinking (RHRD) is a multicomponent, community based program developed to alter alcohol use patterns of people of all ages (e.g. drinking and driving, underage drinking, acute (binge) drinking), and related problems. Creating Lasting Family Connections http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FF1D-DE23-10E6-EF8858CB269ADB72 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FF1D-DE23-10E6-EF8858CB269ADB72& GMT Creating Lasting Family Connections (CLFC) is a comprehensive family strengthening, substance abuse, and violence prevention curriculum that has scientifically demonstrated that youth and families in high risk environments can be assisted to become strong, healthy, and supportive people. Program results, documented with children 11 to 15 years old, have shown significant increases in children's resistance to the onset of substance use and reduction to use of alcohol and other drugs. CLFC provides parents and children with strong defenses against environmental risk factors by teaching appropriate skills for personal growth, family enhancement, and interpersonal communication, including refusal skills for both parents and youth. DARE To Be You http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FF2D-CEFD-85C4-C7E87DFC4B1D0075 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FF2D-CEFD-85C4-C7E87DFC4B1D0075& GMT DARE To Be You (DTBY) is a multilevel, primary prevention program for children 2 to 5 years old and their families. It significantly lowers the risk of future substance abuse and other high risk activities by dramatically improving parent and child protective factors in the areas of communication, problem solving, self esteem, and family skills. Program interventions are designed to: 1) Improve parents' sense of competence and satisfaction with being a parent 2) Provide parents with knowledge and understanding of appropriate child management strategies. 3) Improve parents' and children’s' relationship with their families and peers. 4) Boost children's development levels. Families and Schools Together (FAST) Project http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FF4C-FCD1-3590-3FBF06554B61B66F http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FF4C-FCD1-3590-3FBF06554B61B66F& GMT Families and Schools Together (FAST) is a multifamily group intervention designed to build protective factors and reduce the risk of factors associated with substance abuse and related problem behaviors for children 4 to 12 years old and their parents. FAST systematically applies research on family stress theory, family systems theory, social ecological theory, and community development strategies to achieve its four goals: 1) Enhanced family functioning 2) Prevention of school failure by the targeted child 3) Prevention of substance abuse by the child and other family members 4) Reduced stress from daily life situations for parents and children. One of the primary strategies of FAST is parent empowerment: parents receive support to be the primary prevention agents for their own children. Entire families participate in program activities, that improve intra-family bonds, and enhance the family-school relationship. FAST activities were developed to build the social capital of parents and provided a safe place to practice parenting. As a result of this program the participating children increase their social skills and attention span, while reducing their anxiety and aggression. Research has shown that these childhood behavioral outcomes are correlated in adolescence to the prevention of substance abuse, delinquency, and school failure. The High/Scope Perry Preschool Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FF9A-9C43-DADA-13B06D77B91382D4 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FF9A-9C43-DADA-13B06D77B91382D4& GMT The High/Scope Perry Preschool Program (High/Scope) utilizes an active learning approach to educating children, imparting skills that will support their development through school and into young adulthood. Based on more than 40 years of scientific research, it provides teachers and caregivers with a blueprint for daily routine, classroom and playground organization, and teacher -child interaction, all designed to create a warm, supportive learning environment. In addition, this learning environment encourages independent thinking, initiative, and creativity. High/Scope's goals are for young children to: 1) Learn through active involvement with people, materials, events, and ideas 2) Become independent, responsible, and confident, ready for school and ready for life 3) Learn to plan and execute activities, then talk with other children and teachers about what they have done and what they have learned (Plan-Do-Review) 4) Gain knowledge and skills in important content areas including language and literacy, initiative and social relationships, creative representation, movement, music, mathematics, and logical thinking. Everyday, the program offers one-on-one adult attention, assures children that they can choose interesting things to do, and gives children a sense of control over themselves and their surroundings. Incredible Years Programs http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FFAA-DCBC-A7CF-C47776133DEA503E http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FFAA-DCBC-A7CF-C47776133DEA503E& GMT The incredible Years series features three comprehensive, multi-faceted, and developmentally based curricula for parents, teachers, and children. The program is designed to promote emotional and social competence and to prevent, reduce, and treat behavioral and emotional problems in young children 2 to 8 years old. As well as young children with high rates of aggressive behavioral problems substance abuse problems, children involved with deviant peer groups, who drop out of school, and engage in delinquency and violence. Ultimate the aim of the teacher, parent, and child training programs is to prevent and reduce the occurrence of aggressive and oppositional behavior, thus reducing the chance of developing later delinquent behaviors. Incredible Years addresses multiple risk factors known to be related to the development of disorders in children in both school and home. In all three training programs, trained facilitators use videotaped scenes to structure the content and stimulate group discussion and problem solving. Keep A Clear Mind http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FFBA-AAB7-8294-DDC87C879B58D221 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FFBA-AAB7-8294-DDC87C879B58D221& GMT Keep a Clear Mind (KACM) is a take-home drug education program for upper elementary school students 8 to 12 years old and their parents. The take-home material consists of 4 weekly set of activities to be completed by parents and their children together. The program also uses parent newsletters and incentives. KACM lessons are based on a social skills training model and designed to help children develop specific skills to refuse and avoid the use of "gateway" drugs. This unique, early intervention program has been shown to positively influence known risk factors for later substance use. LifeSkills Training http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FFE9-ADB2-45CF-621A1C5FFBE35B2A http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FFE9-ADB2-45CF-621A1C5FFBE35B2A& GMT LifeSkills Training (LST) is a program that seeks to influence major social and psychological factors that promote the initiation and early use of substances. LifeSkills has distinct curricula targeting elementary and middle school kids aged 8 to 11 and 11 to 14 years old, that are delivered in a series of classroom sessions over 3 years. The sessions use lecture, discussion, coaching, and practice to enhance students' self-esteem, feelings of self-efficacy, ability to make decisions, and ability to resist peer and media pressure. LST consists of three major components that address critical domains found to promote substance use. Research has shown that students who develop skills in these three domains are far less likely to engage in a wide range of high-risk behaviors. The three components each focus on a different set of skills: 1) Drug Resistance Skills enable young people to recognize and challenge common misconceptions about substance use, as well as deal with peers and media pressure to engage in substance use. 2) Personal Self-Management Skills help students examine their self-image and its effects on behavior, set goals and keep track of personal progress, identify everyday decisions and how they may be influenced by others, analyze problem situations, and consider the consequences of alternative solutions before making decisions. 3) General Social Skills give students the necessary skills to overcome shyness, communicate effectively and avoid misunderstandings, use both verbal and nonverbal assertiveness skills to make or refuse request and recognize that they have choices other than aggression or passivity when faced with tough situations. Lions Quest Skills for Adolescence http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FFF8-C0B9-2F38-6E324B16A0CE354E http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FFF8-C0B9-2F38-6E324B16A0CE354E& GMT Lions Quest Skills for Adolescence (SFA) is a comprehensive positive youth development and prevention program designed for school wide and classroom implementation in grades six through eight 10-14 years old. It involves educators, parents, and community members to develop in young adolescents: 1) Essential social and emotional competencies 2) Good citizenship skills 3) Strong, positive character 4) Skills and attitudes consistent with a drug-free lifestyle, and 5) An ethic of service to others within a caring and consistent environment. The classroom curriculum based program may be delivered daily, two to three times per week, or weekly with equal effectiveness, depending on the implementation model. The learning model employs inquiry, presentation, discussion, group work, guided practice, and reflection to build positive social behaviors of self-discipline, responsibility, good judgment, and respect for self and others. It develops positive commitments to the family, school, peers, and community youth. SFA supports social and emotional learning, drug prevention, service learning, and character education initiatives. Health Cares about Domestic Violence Day http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80027-FDDE-D200-CFC53D27A7670B94 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80027-FDDE-D200-CFC53D27A7670B94& GMT Health Cares about Domestic Violence Day (HCADV) is a nationally recognized awareness-raising day that takes place annually on the second Wednesday of October. HCADV Day aims to reach members of the healthcare and domestic violence communities and educate them about the critical importance of routine screening for domestic violence, as well as the long term health implications of domestic violence and lifetime exposure to violence. Over the last five years, as a part of HCADV Day, domestic violence advocates, medical patients, clinicians, students and administrators have organized a variety of activities, educational sessions and awareness campaigns to bring the message into the community. Highlights from HCADV Day 2003 include: South Dakota: Rosebud Indian Health Service began routine domestic violence screening of female patients in its emergency department. Florida: Three hospitals in St. Petersburg and one in Clearwater held trainings addressing domestic violence as a health care issue during the month of October. Iowa: The state Department of Public Health joined with Verizon Wireless and the Iowa Coalition Against Domestic Violence to develop a two-minute video for viewing on 167 screens at 46 theaters throughout the state in October. California: Living in a Nonviolent Community (LINC) and the University of California, San Francisco National Center of Excellence in Women's Health raised awareness amongst staff about the impact of domestic violence on women's health. A reception honored victims and survivors of abuse. The San Francisco Perinatal Substance Abuse Coordinator Council and the San Francisco-Bay area also published articles on domestic violence in its weekly newsletter. Positive Action http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80037-F765-8B54-99FA89451D6D7FD6 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80037-F765-8B54-99FA89451D6D7FD6& GMT Positive Action (PA) is an integrated, comprehensive, and coherent program that has been shown to improve academic achievement and behaviors of children and adolescents 5 to 18 years old in multiple domains. It is intensive, with lessons at each grade level (from kindergarten to 12th) that are reinforced all day, school wide, at home, and in the community. It includes school, family, and community, components that work together or can stand alone. For students, Positive Action improves: 1) Individual self-concept 2) Academic achievement and learning skills, 3) Decision-making, problem solving, and social/interpersonal skills 4) Physical and mental health 5) Behavior, character, and responsibility. PA improves school climate, attendance, achievement scores, disciplinary referrals/suspensions, parent and community involvement, services for special- need and high-risk students, efficiency and effectiveness. Positive Action positively affects instruction and classroom/school management skills of school personnel through improved self-concept, professionalism and interpersonal/social skills and in turn, has a positive impact on their personal lives. Finally, Positive Action helps families by improving parent-child relations and overall family attitudes toward and involvement in school and the community. Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80085-ADFA-7747-60929D1F83B11DCC http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80085-ADFA-7747-60929D1F83B11DCC& GMT Prolonged Exposure (PE) therapy is a cognitive-behavioral treatment program for individuals suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The program consists of a course of individual therapy designed to help clients process traumatic events and thus reduce trauma induced psychological disturbances. 20 years of research has shown that PE significantly reduces the symptoms of PTSD, depression, anger and general consists of 9 to 12, 90 minute sessions. PE includes three components: 1) Psycho-education about common reactions to trauma and the cause of chronic post-trauma difficulties 2) Imaginal exposure: repeated recounting of the traumatic memory (emotional reliving) 3) In-vivo exposure: gradually approaching trauma reminders (e.g. situations, objects) that, despite being safe, are feared and avoided. PE therapy reduces PTSD symptoms including intrusive thoughts, intense emotional distress, nightmares and flashbacks, avoidance, emotional numbing and loss of interest, sleep disturbance, concentration impairment, irritability and anger, hyper vigilance and excessive startle response. Protecting You/Protecting Me http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80094-D247-D722-76BAF28EA7175F5D http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80094-D247-D722-76BAF28EA7175F5D& GMT Protecting You/Protecting Me (PY/PM) is a 5-year, classroom based alcohol use prevention curriculum for elementary students in grades one though five (6 to 11 years old). Designed to reduce alcohol related injury and death in youth, PY/PM: 1) In prove to change children’s' knowledge about their brains and personal development 2) Increase children’s' intentions not to ride with an impaired driver 3) Improves children’s' vehicle safety skills: their ability to protect themselves when they have no option but to ride with an adult who is not alcohol free. Because the program is delivered in elementary school, it reaches children before they have fully formed their attitudes toward alcohol. The curriculum: 1) Incorporates the latest research on human brain development 2) Focuses on the immediate risks of using alcohol before age 21, and 4) Includes parental involvement activities. The program can be taught by trained high school students, as well as by teachers, with high school student teachers deriving short term outcomes including reduced alcohol use and increased perceptions of the risks of underage alcohol use. Second Step http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D800D3-FB28-DB88-C8E9F7FEE559403B http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D800D3-FB28-DB88-C8E9F7FEE559403B& GMT Second Step is a classroom based social skills program for preschool through junior high students 4 to 14 years old. It is designed to reduce impulsive, high risk, and aggressive behaviors; and increase children's social emotional competence and other protective factors. Group discussion, modeling, coaching, and practice are used to increase students' social competence risk assessment, decision-making ability, self-regulation, and positive goal setting. The program's lesson content varies by grade level and is organized into three skill-building units covering: 1) Empathy: teaches young people to identify and understand their own emotions and those of others 2) Impulse control and problem solving: helps young people choose positive goals; reduce impulsiveness; and evaluate consequences of their behavior in terms of safety, fairness, and impact on others 3) Anger management: enables young people to manage emotional reactions and engage in decision-making when they are highly aroused. Strengthening Families Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D800E2-A48C-62CD-997F338BECFBA9BC http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D800E2-A48C-62CD-997F338BECFBA9BC& GMT The Strengthening Families Program I (SFP-I) involves elementary school aged children 6 to 12 years old and their families in family skills training sessions. SFP uses family systems and congnitive behavioral approaches to increase resilience and reduce risk factors for behavioral, emotional,academic, and social problems. It builds on protective factors by: 1) improving family relationships 2) Improving parenting skills, and 3) Increasing the youth's social and life skills. SFP offers incentives for attendance, good behavior in children, and homework completion to increase program recruitment. Arkansas Cardiovascular Health Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80102-D667-83B9-6346D19D1D0F0D7E http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80102-D667-83B9-6346D19D1D0F0D7E& GMT The Arkansas Cardiovascular Health Program collaborates with partners on the Arkansas Wellness Coalition to improve health outcomes by promoting nationally recognized peer-reviewed guidelines for physician care and patient self-management. Other coalition members include the American Heart Association, Arkansas Department of Health's Diabetes Control Program, Arkansas Quality Improvement Organization, Arkansas Medicaid, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, managed care organizations, and pharmaceutical companies. The coalition's first goal is to consolidate effort between health care providers and advocacy organizations to improve quality of care and health outcomes for targeted diseases. The second goal is to improve the consistency and efficiency of care by providing common core principles, and the third goals is to put in place recognized standards of care. The Arkansas Cardiovascular Health Program has played a key role in developing a tool kit of resources to promote these quality improvement goals. The tool kit includes chart tracking forms as well as principles for the primary and secondary prevention of heart disease and stroke, based on the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology guidelines. The coalition has distributed toolkits to 3,600 primary care providers in the state. Missouri Cardiovascular Health Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80140-DF32-D2CC-39AA8BB41F2C9AE2 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80140-DF32-D2CC-39AA8BB41F2C9AE2& GMT The Missouri Cardiovascular Health Program is partnering with the Missouri Diabetes Prevention and Control Program Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) to administer and evaluate a comprehensive approach to improving standards of care for patients with cardiovascular disease, and hypertension. The partners are using a registry of clinical data on patients, thus making it possible to aggressively follow-up on and monitor patients. The FQHCs offer a unique opportunity to reach Missouri's high-risk minority and low-income residents, many of whom live in rural areas. In addition, the Missouri Cardiovascular Health Program has partnered with the Missouri Patient Care Review Foundation, the American Heart Association, and the Missouri Hospital Association to promote the American Heart Association's guidelines for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. HealthNet New Mexico Implementation of CDC Community Guide Physical Activity Recommendations http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8020B-FB4E-1FE3-4DE22A427E5D094D http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8020B-FB4E-1FE3-4DE22A427E5D094D& GMT Many of these programs had success in participation for over 20 years in Zuni. The formula HealthNet New Mexico found useful consisted of the following features: The following "best practice processes" are reinforced by the Guide to Community Preventive Services for Promoting Physical Activity. The following are three of the six strongly recommended categories of interventions: 1) Social support interventions in community settings (Social approaches) 2) Individually-adapted health behavior change programs (Individualize approaches), and 3) Community wide campaigns. The Take Charge Challenge TCC incorporates the following features that are included in the social and individualized approaches suggested by the guide: 1) Goal setting 2) Stage of change 3) Contracts 4) Support groups 5) Structured group problem solving 6) Role models 7) Rewards, and 8) Relapse prevention. The design of "Take Charge Challenge" (TCC) is a theory based intervention that employs a team management and data collection system, goal setting, stages of change, incentives, teams and is designed with an evaluation system that measures outcomes, impact and intervention process. TCC is based on the based on the premise that among the integral elements of behavior change is social support and modeling. Peer team leaders facilitate program management, problem solving, contracting, and data collection. TCC establishes teams from an existing organizational structure in order to promote team building, morale, and organizational development and attempts to insure management and organizational commitment to employee health promotion. Personal empowerment is the ultimate goal of the TCC. When individuals are allowed to choose what they do, when they do it, how often they do it, at what intensity they do it, and where they do it, they are more likely to take responsibility for their behavior change. Goal setting is a critical skill of behavior change and provides individuals with control. TCC provides a point system for physical activity, where one point represents 10 minutes and a participant projects how many points they will attempt to accumulate during the 10 week program. The point system allows simple tracking to determine goal completion and amount of physical activity achieved. Self directed behavior change is difficult. The TCC uses a modified version of the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior. This model suggest that individuals attempting to change a health behavior move through a series of five stages: pre-contemplation (not intending to make a change), contemplation (considering making a change), preparation (planning to make or making small changes), action (actively engaging in a behavior change made in the past six months), and maintenance (sustaining a behavior change for more than 6 months). TCC modified the model by adding a sixth stage - sub-action (engaging in vigorous physical activity less than 3 times a week for 20 minutes or moderate physical activity less than 5 times a week for 30 minutes). TCC has also created a comprehensive win-win incentive system that is linked to data collection. Participants are eligible for incentives at the beginning, middle, and end of the ten-week program. One of the fundamental principles of sustaining behavior change is to change social norms. Social norms change when a critical mass of a population are problem solving. Team leaders are encouraged to recruit half of their department in order to reach the critical mass. The use of stage of change provides the opportunity to assess pre- and post behavior change for outcome measures. The consultant presented the elements and procedures of implementation to IHS management and to the Wellness Committee. Management support is critical for the implementation of the TCC and for any worksite health promotion initiative. Wellness Journey TCC posters were created an distributed throughout the respective work space. Multiple e-mails were sent out by management and progress posters were made that contained graphs and charts that represented participation rates and stages of change information by team and office. CDC's Active Community Environments Initiative (ACES) http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8021B-F85A-8490-EB1E327E38F0D0A6 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8021B-F85A-8490-EB1E327E38F0D0A6& GMT CDC's Active Community Environments Initiative (ACES) promotes walking, bicycling, and the development of accessible recreation facilities. It was developed in response to data from a variety of disciplines, including public health, urban design, and transportation planning. These data suggest characteristics of our communities such as proximity of facilities, street design, density of housing, availability of public transit and of pedestrian and bicycle facilities play a significant role in promoting or discouraging physical activity. This initiative encourages environmental and policy interventions that will affect increased levels of physical activity and improved public health. The goals are to: 1) encourage the development of pedestrian and bicycle friendly environments; 2) promote active forms of transportation like walking and bicycling, and 3) disseminate information related to Active Community Environments. Oregon Dept. of Human Services King Fluoride Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8023A-F12A-CA3E-1EE90A0D7BF871CA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8023A-F12A-CA3E-1EE90A0D7BF871CA& GMT The Oregon Dept. of Human Services, Oral Health Program administers the King Fluoride Program, a school-based program providing weekly fluoride mouth rinses or daily chewable fluoride tablets, as well as oral health education, to children in grades K-6. Vermont Department of Health, Baby Bottle Tooth Decay Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8024A-EFA3-4FE0-B6DA416FAC0286E8 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8024A-EFA3-4FE0-B6DA416FAC0286E8& GMT The Vermont Department of Health, Dental Health Services administers the Baby Bottle Tooth Decay (BBTD) Program. The BBTD Program aims to provide prevention and intervention of early childhood caries through the health care system, targeting children age four years and younger. The program raises awareness and educates providers and parents on the oral health of young children, promotes preventive care (such as fluoride supplement), and facilitates early visits to the dentist. The program: 1) Recruits the support of pediatricians to provide dental health education, fluoride supplements and dental referrals for early prevention; 2) Works with WIC clinics to detect BBTD and make referrals; 3) Offers water fluoride testing of private water sources at assess the need and appropriate dosage of fluoride supplements; 4) Provides a referral list of dentists recruited by the program to accept and treat young children in their practices. The program has recruited 110 dentists to treat children referred by the program, worked with all WIC clinics and assess BBTD, and provided resources and updates to all pediatricians' offices through periodic mailings made three times per year. Dental School Rotations in Five Michigan Communities http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80288-DAF5-3F97-E49FEECCAF843B49 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80288-DAF5-3F97-E49FEECCAF843B49& GMT Five community health centers signed with University of Michigan Dental School to rotate dental students, dental hygiene students and dental residents into their centers to treat Medicaid beneficiaries. In FY 2000-2001, 146 students rotated through the centers treating an additional 8,600 Medicaid clients. All five centers hired dentists who rotated through the program. Open Wide: Oral Health Training for Health Professionals http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80298-A66B-3F37-A294A10F9EC80A59 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80298-A66B-3F37-A294A10F9EC80A59& GMT Open Wide is an oral health training program for non-dental health training program for non-dental health and human service providers including physicians, nurses, nutritionists, childcare and outreach workers. The program training enables non-dental providers to recognize and understand oral diseases and engage in anticipatory guidance and prevention intervention. CSTE/CDC Applied Epidemiology Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D802D6-DA2B-46CE-CE8B736F4DE4CE0F http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D802D6-DA2B-46CE-CE8B736F4DE4CE0F& GMT In response to the need for a skilled workforce in applied epidemiology at state and local health departments, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) has established the Applied Epidemiology Fellowship Program in partnership with the CDC and the ASPH. The goal of the fellowship is to provide a high quality on-the-job training experience in applied epidemiology for recent graduates, and to prepare fellows for long-term career placement at the state and local level. Based on their career aspirations and available positions, fellows are carefully matched to a state or local health agency for two years under the guidance of an experience mentor. During their tenure, fellows will be expected to complete activities and achieve competencies related to epidemiologic methods, communication skills, public health practice, policy, and legal issues. The Fellow may be placed in Georgia, Kansas, Illinois or Indiana. Fellowship assignments are open to any individual with a doctoral degree that has completed at least three graduate-level epidemiology courses and one graduate-level biostatistics course. U.S. Citizenship is required. CSTE hopes to have doctoral-level fellows accepted for inclusion in a September 2005 orientation. Please visit the CSTE website at http://www.cste.org/Workforcedev/main1.htm for more information. Those interested in the chronic disease position, should send an e-mail to fellowship@cste.org to obtain an application. Applications for this position will be accepted until Monday, August 15. CDC Community Guide - Vaccinations http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80F0B-C5AE-94EB-863E08E31E28A462 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80F0B-C5AE-94EB-863E08E31E28A462& GMT The Community Guide's systematic review of the effectiveness of selected population based interventions aimed at improving vaccination coverage in children, adolescents and adults focused on strategies within three strategic areas: <ul> <li> Increasing community demand for vaccinations </li> <li> Enhancing access to vaccination services </li> <li> Provider-based interventions </li> </ul> Project Red Talon http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FA5B-99DC-12BD-E3412BA8409D98E9 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7FA5B-99DC-12BD-E3412BA8409D98E9& GMT Project Red Talon (PRT) utilizes two important symbols of American Indian cultures: 1)"Red" represents Indian people and 2) the powerful eagle talon symbolizes strength, courage, wisdom and honor. These characteristics embody the spirit of Indian cultures NIH-NHLBI's Clinical Guidelines on Cholesterol Management in Adults http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E648-997E-4220-F29C48A9828E1CE6 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E648-997E-4220-F29C48A9828E1CE6& GMT NIH-NHLBI's Clinical Guidelines on Cholesterol Management in Adults (ATP III). Third Report of the Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Aduls (Adult Treatment Panel III). UNM Center for Advanced Research Computing http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E696-D000-1F7A-325D94BBDBAD71BA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E696-D000-1F7A-325D94BBDBAD71BA& GMT The Center for HPC is the focal point for all aspects of high performance computing at the University of New Mexico. The Center is organized around vertically integrated teams that combine research in systems, middleware, and algorithms to enable fundamental scientific and engineering advances. The Center also engages in developing innovative educational and outreach programs and provides production computing resources to faculty, researchers, students and staff. The Jay and Rose Phillips Family Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E6C5-A480-2236-AEDB78D10773E975 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E6C5-A480-2236-AEDB78D10773E975& GMT Giving primarily for health, human services, education, anti-discrimination. Types of support:Building/renovation, capital campaigns, equipment, matching/challenge support, program development/evaluation, seed money, technical assistance. Public Welfare Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E6F4-D436-51E6-034278574AC561A2 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E6F4-D436-51E6-034278574AC561A2& GMT Grants awarded in criminal justice, minorities, environment, population, health, community development and human rights. Types of support: Continuing, general/operating, matching/challenge, program development, seed money Nina Mason Pulliam Legacy Scholarship http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E703-AB09-1806-AE49AC25854AC4BA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E703-AB09-1806-AE49AC25854AC4BA& GMT Charity for people in need, especially women, children and families; to protect animals and nature. Types of support: Film/video/radio;faculty/staff development;debt reduction Daniels Fund http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E723-DD11-A0D2-74972A2A2BC78584 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E723-DD11-A0D2-74972A2A2BC78584& GMT Program areas are: Aging, Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, Amateur Sports, Child and Youth Development, Developmental Disabilities, Equipment for Physical Disabilities, Ethics and Integrity in Education, Homeless and Disadvantaged, and Innovative Education National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E3A8-BCFC-8ECE-4C1BAF415B335008 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E3A8-BCFC-8ECE-4C1BAF415B335008& GMT The NCPPA's mission is to unite the strengths of public, private, and industry efforts into collaborative partnerships that inspire and empower all Americans to lead more physically active lifestyles. New York State Physical Activity Coalition http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E3C7-059B-D1D4-33C9CCFDCAB94C18 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E3C7-059B-D1D4-33C9CCFDCAB94C18& GMT New York State Physical Activity Coalition is a one-stop source of info about increasing physical activity in New York State. Although it is a New York site, its wonderful for free downloads and resource information. President's Council on Physical Fitness & Sports http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E3D7-9E80-B3A3-7BF3CCB8EBEEE3B0 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E3D7-9E80-B3A3-7BF3CCB8EBEEE3B0& GMT President's Council on Physical Fitness & Sports purpose is to advise the President and Secretary of DHHS about issues related to physical activity, fitness and sports. Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholars Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80324-F44A-D02D-11C87BC168E2CEE0 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80324-F44A-D02D-11C87BC168E2CEE0& GMT The Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholars Program is designed to build the nation's capacity for research, leadership and action to address the broad range of factors affecting the health of populations. To be eligible, scholars must have completed their doctoral training by the time of entry into the program (August 2006) in one of a variety of disciplines, ranging from the behavioral and social sciences to the biological and natural sciences and health professions; have significant research experience; be able to clearly connect their research interests to substantive population health concerns; and be U.S. citizens or permanent residents of the U.S. Up to eighteen scholars will be selected for two-year appointments that will begin in the fall semester of 2006. Scholars will receive an annual stipend of $77,000 in year one and $80,000 in year two. Each year the program supports up to 18 outstanding individuals who have completed doctoral training to engage in an intensive two-year interdisciplinary program in population health at one of six nationally prominent universities. On this Web site, you will find eligibility criteria, information about the application process, related resources and program contact information. American Heart Association http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80334-E2C2-296F-E5B60DCFA372166E http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80334-E2C2-296F-E5B60DCFA372166E& GMT Overweight and obesity, especially among children, have emerged as serious threats to our nation's health. They have risen rapidly among women, men and children of all racial and ethnic groups. And the trend is projected to continue. Recent research suggests that, if childhood obesity continues to increase, it could cut two to five years from the average lifespan. That could cause our current generation of children to become the first in American history to live shorter lives than their parents. In response to the health concerns associated with obesity, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the American Heart Association have created a statistical sourcebook on obesity. This publication, "A Nation at Risk: Obesity in the United States," illustrates how prevalent obesity has become and examines the factors that contribute to the patterns of unhealthy eating and insufficient physical activity that are at the heart of this epidemic. Learn the facts about obesity by ordering your free sourcebook "A Nation at Risk: Obesity in the United States." To pre-order your free copy to be delivered in May, please contact the American Heart Association at 1-800-AHA-USA1 or send e-mail to inquiries@heart.org. Honoring the Gift of Heart Health: A Heart Health Educator’s Manual for American Indians http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80373-0FAC-8250-E9F60FCB6AC2E3FA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80373-0FAC-8250-E9F60FCB6AC2E3FA& GMT A Heart Health Educator's Manual: A comprehensive culturally appropriate, user-friendly 10 lesson course on heart-health education for the American Indian community. Filled with skill-building activities, reproducible handouts, and idea starters. Two appendices cover activities for training Heart Health Educators to implement the program, and An American Indian Family's Journey to heart health, told with heart healthy recipes for each family member's favorite foods. Cover, spine, and 3-hole punched text is ready to assemble in a 1-inch binder. NHLBI Publication No. 5218. 2003. 203 pages. Examining the Negative Effects of Excessive TV http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80382-E822-E5AE-6DEDC5EF8FBE4C0E http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80382-E822-E5AE-6DEDC5EF8FBE4C0E& GMT A curriculum to reduce the negative effects of excessive television, videotape and video game use. THRIVE: Tool for Health and Resilience in Vulnerable Environments http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80392-A789-70DF-A994AFBC04409467 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80392-A789-70DF-A994AFBC04409467& GMT THRIVE is a community assessment tool that helps residents and local leaders to identify and target those factors in the community environment that hold the most promise for improving health outcomes and reducing disparities. THRIVE provides a practical approach to alleviate the ways that poverty, racism, and other forms of oppression play out at the community level. PROMISING PRACTICES IN CHRONIC DISEASE PREVENTION AND CONTROL: A PUBLIC HEALTH FRAMEWORK FOR ACTION http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D803B1-F134-6D95-45CD4B9C00724AB7 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D803B1-F134-6D95-45CD4B9C00724AB7& GMT The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed this book to share its vision of how states and their partners can reduce the prevalence of chronic diseases and their risk factors by instituting comprehensive statewide programs. The recommendations for achieving this vision are based on prevention effectiveness research; program evaluations; and the expert opinions of national, state, and local leaders and public health practitioners, including CDC staff. In addition to describing some of the most promising practices available to state programs, the book provides numerous sources, including Web sites, that describe state and local examples of what can be achieved; state-of-the art strategies, methods, and tools; and training opportunities. We hope that this book will provide a framework that will help state and local health departments build new chronic disease prevention and control programs and enhance existing programs. Boys & Girls Club of the Three Affiliated Tribes http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D803C1-0CCA-DD67-EA557ECD6F7EAB46 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D803C1-0CCA-DD67-EA557ECD6F7EAB46& GMT The Boys & Girls Club of the Three Affiliated Tribes provides a safe place to learn and grow on-going relationships with caring, adult professionals, life enhancing programs, character development experiences, hope, and opportunity for the youth of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation. The ultimate goal of our project is to get the youth of Fort Berthold on a path to a healthy productive future, with the ability to make healthy and positive choices. Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Injury Prevention Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8041E-0DC2-EB32-A3F842D308C8AD22 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8041E-0DC2-EB32-A3F842D308C8AD22& GMT The overall goal of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Injury Prevention Program is: To prevent motor vehicle crash related fatalities and injuries in young adults (ages 14-29 years of age) by implementing a public health strategy that employs the “4-E’s”: Education, Enforcement, Engineering, and Environment to address causal factors of driving under the influence of alcohol and other substances, speed, and failing to use or properly use occupant restraints (seat belts and child safety seats). Many of the projects that the SWO Injury Prevention Program implements in the community are the result of collaborations with other programs. Monthly seat belt checkpoints are conducted in collaboration with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Law Enforcement. A sentencing alternative for first time DUI offenders in the form of a Victim Impact Panel has been up and running for over two years because of a collaboration with Codington County MADD. Ride Safe was implemented due to collaborations between I.H.S., Injury Prevention and the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Head Start. IHS Elder Care http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8047C-B699-71DB-6E05270C56DB78D8 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8047C-B699-71DB-6E05270C56DB78D8& GMT The program provides coordinated, interdisciplinary care for elders and their families. Case studies have been purposeful in that they have reminded us to open up to new possibilities, highlight key elements for elder care, i.e., care coordination, support for the family caregiver, importance of quality of life as perceived by the elder, etc. These case studies have an additional value in that they prompt the question “How do we ensure that every elder in our health system has access to the care they need?” Dr. Finke, who spent the last 10 years promoting the development of geriatric specific services in the IHS system, has come to understand that this is not the way to ensure reliably high quality care for every elder. The solution to ensuring reliably high quality care of elders is in ensuring reliably high quality care for everyone. The principles that drive good care of chronic conditions in patients of every age are the same as the principles of good elder care. The only reasonable way to reliably identify and address depression in every affected elder or to identify and support the vulnerable caregivers of elders with dementia is to systematically integrate behavioral health into primary care. This does not mean that improvements are not still needed. This is still a large task. Broadening our focus to look at the prevention and care of chronic conditions across all ages is where the solution lies to improve care of the elderly. Design features that support the delivery of care within relationships and across time, that really, truly support patient driven health care, and that allow providers to tailor the services provided to the care needed should be build into our primary care design. A health system that is designed to provide quality care, reliably, across the age span and across conditions will achieve reliably high quality care for our elders. Center for Fitness Wellness Scholarship to Increase Physical Activity http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D804CA-97E2-A46D-804BC9D2FD5EF737 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D804CA-97E2-A46D-804BC9D2FD5EF737& GMT The Center for Fitness has implemented a Wellness Scholarship in hopes of reaching potential members that have limited financial capabilities, but by also allowing these members to take a vested financial interest in their membership. Through this scholarship we aim to educate on the importance of combining fitness and nutrition to our communities’ wellness goals. We aim to continually stress how important exercise combined with nutrition are the lock and key to managing the demands of life and the curves it throws at you. We hope our program will meet the needs of our community in addressing that fitness, wellness and exercise is necessary across the lifespan. Our objectives are to combine fitness and nutrition by using a vested financial interest plan for members to reach their wellness goals. Our methods include a 2-week registration period for new membership. Upon registration new members will be given both a nutrition in-take assessment and a fitness assessment. The nutrition component will comprise of a Tanita body composition and weight assessment, 24-hour recall, diet and nutrition history, discussion of patients goals, and meal planning. The fitness assessment will consist of blood pressure testing, bicep strength, sit and reach, cardiovascular test using a 3-minute step test, girth measurements and a skin fold caliper test using by testing 3 sites. All of these scores will be used as each member’s baseline scores to address areas to improve in or made modifications in. Our strategies include holding our members accountable to their goals. Guidelines for participation include: Exercise a minimum of 12 times per month. Each exercise session should be a minimum of 30 minutes each. During each visit members will sign in and sign out on a designated log-book for tracking. Every 3 month at a minimum they will receive a follow-up fitness assessment. Each month members will meet with the Dietitian 2 times per month to discuss nutrition goals and outcomes. Upon completion of each month: Each member will be evaluated on meeting the program guidelines. If all criteria are met, one of 2 possibilities could occur: $15 is returned back to the member in the form of cash back. Or $15 is credited to their next months’ membership to continue with the program When setting goals with the member it will be collaboration between the member and the staff (either the exercise physiologist or dietitian). All goals will be reasonable and measurable. During the 2-week window of sign-up we will have a nutrition/ fitness handout of the month that the member can take home with them on a variety of topics to be determined by the staff member. Leech Lake Tribal College Herbal Remedies classes http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D804E9-D68C-1241-90A24EB6EB8EC491 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D804E9-D68C-1241-90A24EB6EB8EC491& GMT The Leech Lake Tribal College has been offering Herbal Remedies classes for over a year on a monthly basis. Topics covered are an herbal medicine chest, teas to de-toxify the body, teas & tinctures to build up the body, traditional medicines and teas, traditional foods, and traditional health medicine recipes. The Leech Lake Tribal College Community Education is currently sponsoring a semester long Herbal Remedies class. The students are learning about common MN herbs and plants such as: Yarrow, Nettle, Chamomile, Cleavers, Plantain, Dandelion, Red Clover, Mullein, Lemon Balm, Elder Flower, and Lavender. The class is hands on for harvesting, picking, seeing, touching, smelling, drinking, making tinctures, teas, salves, and syrups. Students are learning to identify what can help themselves and their families. They are also noting that these herbs are in their yards and out their own back doors. The class has harvested swamp tea and cedar tea also. HABIT 4 HEALTH http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80509-BDC7-448B-32D171BF3359EDD7 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80509-BDC7-448B-32D171BF3359EDD7& GMT HABIT 4 HEALTH is a Fitness Program, developed by our Fitness Specialist, Antonia Barrett, to improve your current level of health and wellbeing, to improve diabetes control, and to prevent the onset of medical problems due to physical inactivity. Physical activity is one of the most important tools to maintain and improve overall health and wellness. Unfortunately, less than 27% of adults in the United States are active enough to gain any health benefits from exercise. The HABIT 4 HEALTH Fitness Program is comprised of several key components of fitness including strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular fitness. Stanford Patient Education Research Center - Diabetes Self-Management Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80518-B4B2-92D8-3FA122D5AE176EAF http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80518-B4B2-92D8-3FA122D5AE176EAF& GMT The Diabetes Self-Management Program developed by Stanford Patient Education Research Center is an evidence-based community intervention that has been shown to improve chronic disease self-management across diverse populations. It has been implemented in several countries. The grass-roots community group the Diabetes Community Action Committee (DCAC) which consists of urban American Indians in the San Jose, CA area, implemented the program within their population, in a partnership with Stanford University. The program was successful in improving several different outcomes for diabetes management. CSU Monthly Blood Pressure Education Classes http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80538-9454-00A5-AEF89323947E6DBE http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80538-9454-00A5-AEF89323947E6DBE& GMT The CSU has offered monthly Blood Pressure education classes for patients with hypertension and cardiovascular disease for the past 2.5 years. The primary objective of the program is to offer healthy life style choices that will help the individual maintain control of his/her hypertension and/or cardiovascular disease and reduce complications. Topics related to blood pressure control and Cardiovascular disease are covered-definitions, causes, nutrition, medication and adherence, how to increase activity, stress management and symptoms of stroke and heart attack. The class is typically given in two 2-hour sessions, a week apart. Participants pick a lifestyle change they would like to begin working on in the coming week and report progress/obstacles and successes the second week. A packet of written material and recipes are given, many are Native American oriented. Material is drawn from Honoring the Gift of Heart Health, IHS, the local Health Dept, and regional-type simple recipes that others have enjoyed. Because the literacy level of the participants has a wide range, the class structure uses several formats-videos, storytelling, group sharing, visuals such as salt and fat models, and practice with labels. Blood pressures are checked at each class, a low fat/low sodium meal preparation demonstration is given, and opportunity for questions and sharing among the participants. A blood pressure cuff is provided for home monitoring at the end of the class. Class size is small with no more than 8 participants each time. A RD/CDE and a CHR or CNA do the class, take blood pressures and instruct on the home monitors. It has been successful in drawing participants who normally don’t like to come to group activities, because of shyness or other reasons. They seem more likely to come if they are told the class is small and their Provider has referred them. The time is alternated between day and evening classes each month. The discussion on stress management is usually very insightful and people typically seem to want to prolong this part of the class and find help for managing the stress in their lives. CSU Shoe Clinic for Patients with Diabetes http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80547-E73B-3A15-86AE8D9E83B91D66 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80547-E73B-3A15-86AE8D9E83B91D66& GMT The CSU has offered a shoe clinic for patients with diabetes. The purpose of the clinic is to provide properly fitting footwear and appliances. The first objective is to reduce complications by eliminating pressure points and irritation from improperly fitting shoes. A second objective is to encourage increased activity and assist in reducing complications through maintaining better diabetes control. Sweat practices http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80576-908C-2A01-630444A2C6C04627 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80576-908C-2A01-630444A2C6C04627& GMT Sweat practices have been used around the world for thousands of years to help people gain more physical, mental, and spiritual health. This group uses group sweating with the use of a sauna as a medium for group psychotherapy for people with anxiety problems. The goal of the program is to help people reduce anxiety symptoms and improve coping. North American Indian Center of Boston’s Urban Health Program - General Website http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80595-0C3D-D33C-2F97BFAAA38D980D http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80595-0C3D-D33C-2F97BFAAA38D980D& GMT he North American Indian Center of Boston’s Urban Health Program, Behavioral Health Program and Tecumseh House Substance Abuse Program utilize a multidisciplinary team approach to case management. This approach serves to fully address clients’ medical, mental health and substance abuse needs. It also serves to cut down on duplication of services by keeping all departments informed of services rendered to clients and what their future needs may be. Members of the team include certified substance abuse counselors, a licensed psychologist, a diabetes program nurse, a community health nurse and a community health advocate. Regularly scheduled team members are held. San Diego Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E742-B6FA-2F94-0068928C2630CC4C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E742-B6FA-2F94-0068928C2630CC4C& GMT The San Diego Foundation is San Diego's leading resource for information about charitable giving and community needs. We encourage and support meaningful dialogue on issues affecting each of our communities and work with philanthropists to develop creative solutions to meet critical community needs. San Francisco Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E761-0AE2-282A-D31C3651C4516936 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E761-0AE2-282A-D31C3651C4516936& GMT The San Francisco Foundation mobilizes resources and acts as a catalyst for change to build strong communities, foster civic leadership, and promote philanthropy. Type of support: Program development;management support; emergency funds;techincal assistance. Santa Barbara Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E7CE-DE1E-F9DC-83CDF27578B9535A http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E7CE-DE1E-F9DC-83CDF27578B9535A& GMT The Santa Barbara Foundation is a community foundation established in 1928 to enrich the lives of the people of Santa Barbara County through philanthropy. Type of support includes program support. Dr. Scholl Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E7DE-03C1-1DA7-70FDF641B2F88AB6 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E7DE-03C1-1DA7-70FDF641B2F88AB6& GMT The Dr. Scholl Foundation (formerly the William M. Scholl Foundation) was established by William M. Scholl, M.D. in 1947. It is a private, independent grant-making foundation created for charitable purposes. Type of support: Continuing support; program development; curriculum development. New Mexico Youth Soccer http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E80D-E6B9-9302-6FE00AF6CEDA57B5 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E80D-E6B9-9302-6FE00AF6CEDA57B5& GMT The purpose of NMYSA is to develop, promote, teach and administer the game of soccer for youth (boys and girls under the age of 19) within New Mexico. DHHS, Office on Disability, Physical Fitness and Health: (I Can Do It, You Can Do It) http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E81C-E6C9-C2D9-ED3F5B5FAD105755 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E81C-E6C9-C2D9-ED3F5B5FAD105755& GMT DHHS/OD's "I can do it - You can do it" is an exciting nation-wide initiative supporting physical activity for children and youth with disabilities. To improve the health of the six million American children who have disabilities by encouraging increased physical activity and healthy nutritional behaviors-a major priority of DHHS Secretary Thompson. The Otto Bremer Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E82C-A8DD-3B98-903E786330810DED http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E82C-A8DD-3B98-903E786330810DED& GMT The mission of the Otto Bremer Foundation is to promote human rights and create opportunities for economic and social justice.? Support also for postsecondary education in MN, human services, health, religion, community affairs, and food relief and recovery. The grantmaker has identified the following area(s) of interest: Community Affairs; Human Rights; Organizational Effectiveness Program; Rural Poverty. Marshall L. and Perrine D. McCune Charitable Foundation, Inc. http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E84B-C93D-7038-4B93A6A8D5F6A6A5 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E84B-C93D-7038-4B93A6A8D5F6A6A5& GMT It is the mission of the Marshall L. and Perrine D. McCune Charitable Foundation, Inc. to memorialize its benefactors through grants which enrich the cultural life, health, education, environment, and spiritual life of the citizens of New Mexico. The Oregon Community Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E85B-A3A5-93DE-108B1D1F8E2B3CDF http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E85B-A3A5-93DE-108B1D1F8E2B3CDF& GMT The Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) was established as a nonprofit corporation in 1973. The Foundation was created by community leaders who saw the need for a common investment and grant management vehicle for private charitable gifts. The Foundation's three main functions are to (1) Build a permanent charitable endowment by managing donors' individually tailored funds. (2) Make grants and scholarships from those funds. (3) Provide leadership to address community needs. The Paul G. Allen Foundations http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E87A-A56C-BE6D-6BDF8C7DD4045737 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E87A-A56C-BE6D-6BDF8C7DD4045737& GMT Charity begins at home, and the Paul G. Allen Foundations were created with that charter in mind. In giving to a variety of innovative cultural, civic and community organizations in the region, the foundations support worthwhile activities that promote real change in the many communities they serve. List of areas include healthy development of populations, arts, music, forest protection, virtual education and medical research. The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E88A-AE86-FB10-679E9466AE89A80B http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E88A-AE86-FB10-679E9466AE89A80B& GMT The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation is a non-profit, private operating foundation focusing on the major health care issues facing the nation. The Foundation is an independent voice and source of facts and analysis for policymakers, the media, the health care community, and the general public. KFF develops and runs its own research and communications programs, often in partnership with outside organizations. The Foundation contracts with a wide range of outside individuals and organizations through its programs. The Hearst Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E8A9-0678-2CBF-4088EBC48808212D http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E8A9-0678-2CBF-4088EBC48808212D& GMT The Hearst Foundation, Inc. was founded in 1945 by philanthropist William Randolph Hearst. In 1948, Mr. Hearst established the California Charities Foundation. That name was changed to the William Randolph Hearst Foundation soon after Mr. Hearst's death in 1951. Both Foundations are independent private philanthropies operating separately from The Hearst Corporation. The charitable goals of the two Foundations are essentially the same, and reflect the philanthropic interests of William Randolph Hearst -- Education, Health, Social Service and Culture. Within these four areas, the Foundations assist institutions in providing opportunities to underserved and underrepresented populations. The Gates Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E8B9-FF72-0A86-97800CF4500D7F50 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E8B9-FF72-0A86-97800CF4500D7F50& GMT The foundation was created in January 2000, through the merger of the Gates Learning Foundation, which worked to expand access to technology through public libraries, and the William H. Gates Foundation, which focused on improving global health. Led by Bill Gates’ father, William H. Gates, Sr., and Patty Stonesifer, the Seattle-based foundation has an endowment of approximately $27 billion Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E8F7-0532-AB58-B6915CB8EE26C14A http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E8F7-0532-AB58-B6915CB8EE26C14A& GMT The Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation has existed for nearly a half century. Its aim is to align the focus areas of the Foundation with the most pressing needs of the society in which our company operates. Giving for selective medical research, national elementary and secondary science education reform in operating locations, and women's health; support also for civic affairs and community services, youth agencies, health care, international affairs, and arts and culture. General Mills http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E916-DA79-58F2-913BBAF1A5794DBF http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E916-DA79-58F2-913BBAF1A5794DBF& GMT General Mills invests in the people, neighborhoods and education of the communities in which we live and work. In fiscal 2003, the Foundation contributed over $20 million in grants in our communities. The Foundation's headquarters' grants will focus in the areas of family life, youth nutrition and fitness, education, arts and culture and United Way. In General Mills communities outside the Twin Cities, our two key grantmaking priorities are improving youth nutrition and fitness, and United Way. The Rasmuson Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E926-EA43-AB0C-B15B0B0A3E01B7CA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E926-EA43-AB0C-B15B0B0A3E01B7CA& GMT The Rasmuson Foundation is a private foundation dedicated to supporting well-managed non-profit organizations in Alaska which provide a unique service and ensure that basic human needs are met and the quality of life for all Alaskans is enhanced. The Foundation awards approximately $20 million annually to help improve the quality of life in Alaska. The Rockefeller Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E955-01DA-050E-D544FB44CB3C72CC http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E955-01DA-050E-D544FB44CB3C72CC& GMT The Rockefeller Foundation is a knowledge-based global foundation with a commitment to enrich and sustain the lives and livelihoods of poor and excluded people throughout the world. In order to maximize its resources and leverage the Foundation's strengths, grantmaking is organized around four thematic lines of work: Creativity & Culture, Food Security, Health Equity and Working Communities. A cross-theme of Global Inclusion supports, promotes and supplements the work of these themes. The Ford Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E974-CE1B-9BFD-6B3846BE69A4DF33 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7E974-CE1B-9BFD-6B3846BE69A4DF33& GMT The foundation's mission is to serve as a resource for innovative people and institutions worldwide. Its goals are to: strengthen democratic values, reduce poverty and injustice, promote international cooperation, and advance human achievement. Grants are made primarily within three broad categories: (1) asset building and community development; (2) knowledge, creativity, and freedom; and (3) peace and social justice. Local needs and priorities, within these subject areas, determine program activities in individual countries. Primary Health Care: The Health Center Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EA4F-DFC6-BC7B-84643EFEA659C305 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EA4F-DFC6-BC7B-84643EFEA659C305& GMT Grants are awarded to increase access to comprehensive primary and preventive health care and improve the health status of underserved and vulnerable populations in the area to be served. Individual health center grant mechanisms include: (1) Community Health Centers; (2) Migrant Health Centers; (3) Health Care for the Homeless; (4) Public Housing Primary Care Program; and (5) School Based Health Centers. Applications should be designed to improve the availability, accessibility and provision of primary health care services. Funds may not be used for inpatient services, or to make cash payments to intended recipients of services. U.S Department of Education-Grants for Drug Prevention Programs http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EC33-C91E-B380-1A237743991C8C54 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EC33-C91E-B380-1A237743991C8C54& GMT To offer a disciplined environment conducive to learning, by preventing violence in and around schools and strengthen programs that prevent the illegal use of alcohol, tobacco, and drugs, involve parents, and coordinated with related Federal, State, and community efforts and resources. Drug prevention programs must convey a clear and consistent message that the illegal use of alcohol and other drugs is wrong and harmful. Generally, funds under the program may not be used for construction, medical services, or drug treatment or rehabilitation. HRSA Grants for Primary Care Program for Homeless Individuals http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EC91-FD94-77E8-3818C7704CA4DECA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EC91-FD94-77E8-3818C7704CA4DECA& GMT To award grants for the purpose of enabling grantees, directly or through contracts, to provide for the delivery of primary health services and substance abuse (alcohol and/or illicit drugs) services to homeless individuals including homeless children. The grants may be used to continue to provide the services listed above for up to 12 months to individuals who have obtained permanent housing if services were provided to these individuals when they were homeless. For the purpose of this program, the term "homeless individual" means an individual who lacks housing (without regard to whether the individual is a member of a family), including an individual whose primary residence during the night is a supervised public or private facility that provides temporary living accommodations or an individual who is a resident in transitional housing. Grant funds must be used to provide the following services, directly or through contract: (1) Primary health care and substance abuse services at locations accessible to homeless individuals; (2) 24-hour emergency primary health and substance abuse services; (3) referral, as appropriate to medical facilities, for necessary hospital services; (4) referral of homeless individuals who are mentally ill to entities that provide mental health services; (5) outreach services to inform homeless individuals of the availability of primary health and substance abuse services; and (6) aid in establishing eligibility for assistance, and in obtaining services under entitlement programs. Federal funds may not supplant existing public or private resources that are currently allocated to assist homeless populations. HRSA Rural Health Policy http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7ECDF-9346-30C5-7CE9029395E22F29 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7ECDF-9346-30C5-7CE9029395E22F29& GMT To (1) Build infrastructure through workshops, conferences, etc., (2) develop and provide information to a wide audience, (3) increase awareness of Federal and State resources, and (4) build partnerships between Federal and State governments. SAMHSA Grants for Mental Illness and Substance Abuse Programs for the Homeless http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EED3-B799-81D2-C61F04720BEBA633 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EED3-B799-81D2-C61F04720BEBA633& GMT To provide financial assistance to States to support services for individuals who are suffering from serious mental illness or serious mental illness and substance abuse; and are homeless or at imminent risk of becoming homeless. Programs and activities include: (1) Outreach services; (2) screening and diagnostic treatment services; (3) habilitation and rehabilitation services; (4) community mental health services; (5) alcohol or drug treatment services; (6) staff training; (7) case management services; (8) supportive and supervisory services in residential settings; (9) referrals for primary health services, job training, educational services, and relevant housing services; and (10) prescribed set of housing services. Funds may be used at the discretion of the State to achieve the described objectives except that funds cannot be used: (1) To support emergency shelters or construction of housing facilities; (2) for inpatient psychiatric or substance abuse treatment costs; or (3) to make cash payments to intended recipients of mental health or substance abuse services. Not more than 20 percent of the payment may be expended for housing services; not more than 4 percent of the total allocation may be expended for administrative expenses. The applicants must agree that the payments will be expended solely for making grants to political subdivisions of the State, and to nonprofit private entities (including community-based veterans organizations and other community organizations) for the purpose of providing the services. RWJF Community Health Leaders National Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EEE2-B03E-12A9-2D5B06FDD4BD427B http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EEE2-B03E-12A9-2D5B06FDD4BD427B& GMT CHLP's national award recognizes individuals whose innovation, accomplishment and compassion often go unrecognized. It seeks individuals whose leadership goes beyond caring and commitment. Nominees must be catalysts for change and have significant impact upon the larger community. Nominees must be mid-career (five to 15 years in the field of community health) and work to improve effective community-based programs that are struggling to grow and respond to emerging challenges-- rather than more established programs. The program office in Boston supports and encourages community health leaders to develop their programs into national models of community-based healthcare solutions. The Technology Opportunities Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EF11-BAC0-A300-031B60B8D5804F20 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EF11-BAC0-A300-031B60B8D5804F20& GMT TOP makes matching grants to state, local and tribal governments, health care providers, schools, libraries, police departments, and community-based non-profit organizations. TOP projects demonstrate how digital networks support lifelong learning for all Americans, help public safety officials protect the public, assist in the delivery of health care and public health services, and foster communication, resource-sharing, and economic development within rural and urban communities. WHO Quality and standards http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EF40-CC89-73D1-1D0BF2714AD24518 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EF40-CC89-73D1-1D0BF2714AD24518& GMT To reduce financial and technical barriers to the introduction of new and existing vaccines and immunization-related technologies in the immunization programmes of the world. ATT provides technical advice and support to UN Agencies and member states in the areas of vaccine quality, demand, immunization financing, cold chain and logistics, and supply. Immunization Action Coalition http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EF5F-AC1D-7405-5A0E955B7212E75A http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EF5F-AC1D-7405-5A0E955B7212E75A& GMT www.immunize.org/resources/contents.htm#tableofcontents The W.K. Kellogg Foundation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EFBD-DF3B-5CC7-37447E581BC4F57C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D7EFBD-DF3B-5CC7-37447E581BC4F57C& GMT Health programming at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation focuses explicitly on improving individual and community health, and improving access and quality of health care as a means to that end. Specifically, grant making focuses on the powerful non-biological determinants of health, and targets communities, health care systems, and public health as a center for change. Here "health care" is broadly defined to include the array of services, policies, and resources that achieve and sustain the health of individuals, including but not limited to medical services and coverage. "Public health" includes those systems that protect, maintain, and monitor the health of a population. Navajo WIC Nutrition Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D805D4-9D0B-49B2-2B7210D599635653 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D805D4-9D0B-49B2-2B7210D599635653& GMT The Navajo WIC Nutrition Program instigated a Breastfeeding Peer Counselor Program in July 2005. The Breastfeeding Peer Counselors (BFPCs) counsel WIC pregnant and breastfeeding women. They support women in all aspects of breastfeeding: education, encouragement, breastfeeding management, etc. Currently, there are two BFPCs at Ft. Defiance WIC (began in July 2005) and one at Winslow Indian Health Care hospital (began in March 2007). We hope to have four more BFPCs in FY 2008. The Navajo WIC Nutrition Program collaborates with IHS and 638 facilities in the areas where there are BFPCs. We have already seen that Ft. Defiance WIC has the highest breastfeeding rate of all the Navajo WIC Nutrition Program clinics. The BFPC Program is based on extensive research done by USDA. The BFPCs are trained using the Loving Support Curriculum before they do any counseling with pregnant and breastfeeding women. Indian Health Care Resource Center Childhood Project http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80612-D635-B94A-91C18FA8E7584A4F http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80612-D635-B94A-91C18FA8E7584A4F& GMT Indian Health Care Resource Center is an urban Indian clinic providing services to the Tulsa metro area. We are seeing high numbers of childhood obesity cases, as is typical of most Indian clinics. In our youth ages 5 - 12, 30% are above the 85th percentile on BMI for age. Of the youth ages 13 - 18, 35% are above the 85th percentile on BMI for age. Based on this information, we have designed our IHS CYP grant to assess and evaluate the risk factors that children ages 5 - 18 have for diabetes. Currently we have data collected on 90 children who are above the 85th percentile on BMI for age. This data includes lab data (lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, and C-peptide) and an extensive survey regarding the family and child - eating and activity habits, whether or not the child was breastfed, at what age were solid food started, and much more. We are having the data analyzed by the University of Oklahoma Nursing program at this time. One interesting preliminary outcome is that 25% of the children have lipid problems, showing an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Additional correlations are expected. This program will help us learn more about what risk factors may lead to a pediatric DM2 diagnosis. This will allow practitioners and parents to be more aware of the early warning signs and make lifestyle changes to avoid the early onset of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Muscogee Creek Nation Diabetes http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80641-BE1F-6770-34BA8373923A91A6 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80641-BE1F-6770-34BA8373923A91A6& GMT The Muscogee Creek Nation Diabetes program offered a Jump Rope club for the 4th – 8th grade students at Okemah Middle School and the 4th – 8th grade students at Mason School. The students were taught the alternative sport of jump rope as an individual and team activity. This program stresses daily exercise, diabetes prevention education, and the practice of jumping skills in an effort to prevent diabetes. The purpose of this club is to give the students another alternative to organized sports to stay active and healthy. The students traveled to different schools to demonstrate their jumping skills and to spark interest in jumping rope in the students from other schools. They also participated in the American Heart Associations’ Jump Rope for Heart. A local school volunteer was trained over the year and will be leading the program at each school in 07-08. This year, we will continue to support the Mason and Okemah programs with start up funding and we will start two new programs at Dewar and Ryal Schools. Pawnee Service Unit’s Reach Out and Read Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80680-937A-A8C9-56C1B96FB75868EA http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80680-937A-A8C9-56C1B96FB75868EA& GMT The purpose of the Pawnee Service Unit’s Reach Out and Read Program is not about teaching our young Indian children to read early, but is about helping them to grow really motivated, loving books, associating books strongly with the pleasure of spending time with their parents. At the Pawnee Service Unit, when a child comes in for a Well Child Exam- the Pediatrician encourages reading and each child goes home with a new book. There are certain aspects of reading development that can be thought of as the literacy equivalent of a vaccination towards Health. The goal here is to promote Wellness and Family Attachment. The Pawnee Service Unit’s Reach Out and Read Program are based at both the Pawnee Indian Health Center and at the Pawhuska Indian Health Center. According to a leading expert on Mental Health, John Bowlby, believes that for Good Health that it is essential for the infant and young child to experience a warm, intimate and continuous relationship with their mother (or permanent mother substitute). According to John Bowlby, with the comfort and security of a stable and routine attachment to the mother-or other primary caregiver- a child is able to organize other elements of development in a coherent way. In contrast, instability in the care-giving relationship—whether physical distance, erratic patterns of parental behavior, or even physical or emotional abuse—may interfere with the sense of trust and security, potentially giving rise to anxiety and psychological problems later in childhood or even decades later in life. The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study1has revealed that the roots of Medical Problems are from Childhood Psychological Trauma. The Ace Study has shown us that Adult Risk Behaviors such as smoking, overeating, substance abuse or promiscuity are often Masks for other Problems. As children witness multiple adult dysfunctions, they will cope by overeating, smoking, becoming promiscuous or using drugs and alcohol. This all leads to poor physical and mental health later in life. One way to foster attachment for our families is simply by supporting our reading program. We can help our children to grow up loving books & stories in a strong association with the pleasure of spending time with their parents and families. So far, our reading program has brought in more than $25,000 in funding or book donations and has given out more than 2,000 books. Program sustaining grants include 2 large book distributions from the First Book National Book Bank over the last 3 months. EPA Environmental Education (EE) http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D806CE-A408-1041-1D1ED57271C7AB35 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D806CE-A408-1041-1D1ED57271C7AB35& GMT EPA website provides links to web-based training information, guidelines and assessment tools for environmental education, and multiple training opportunities EPA Student Center http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D806ED-BA34-6729-C6F28932829EF774 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D806ED-BA34-6729-C6F28932829EF774& GMT EPA website targeted at children, with educational activities and links to other activities and projects for childrens groups to use to learn about the environment. Army Corps of Engineers Education Center http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D806FD-9685-06D4-B69F6C9749DC8841 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D806FD-9685-06D4-B69F6C9749DC8841& GMT Army Corps of Engineers Education Center website with tools for online or classroom environmental education National Environmental, Safety and Health http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80799-ED80-68DF-43ED378655F37D92 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80799-ED80-68DF-43ED378655F37D92& GMT Educational and professional society for trainers and educators, provides training, workshops with an emphasis on environmental safety and health CDC National Immunization Program AI/AN Specific http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D807E7-E568-8EC7-946961B501E87937 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D807E7-E568-8EC7-946961B501E87937& GMT National Immunization Program website with specific materials and resources for AI/AN populations National Maternal and Oral Health Resorce Center http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80864-9C2D-5F19-D7599A9106E1CAD4 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80864-9C2D-5F19-D7599A9106E1CAD4& GMT National Maternal and Oral Health Resorce Center home page with links to materials, resources, and educational opportunities Three Feathers Associates Head Start Services http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80910-A27F-DB7F-738DBD35F58A2D09 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80910-A27F-DB7F-738DBD35F58A2D09& GMT A national provider of training, technical assistance and direct services, TFA has mechanisms to disseminate information, training and educational programs quickly and efficiently to Indian tribes and Native American agencies. Native American Sports Council http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8096D-998E-7810-AFC9936C9206C776 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8096D-998E-7810-AFC9936C9206C776& GMT Home page of the Native American Sports Council - provides coach clinics, facilitator training, and team building California Adolescent Nutrition and Fitness (CANFit) Program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8098D-EBC8-9BA5-1B50874C194CA76C http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D8098D-EBC8-9BA5-1B50874C194CA76C& GMT The California Adolescent Nutrition and Fitness (CANFit) Program is a statewide, non-profit organization whose mission is to engage communities and build their capacity to improve the nutrition and physical activity status of California´s low-income African American, American Indian, Latino, and Asian/ Pacific Islander youth 10-14 years old. CANFit provides: Training & Technical Assistance, Awarding Academic Scholarships, Funding Community Projects, Advocating for Policy Changes. Healthfinder.gov index of physical activity information, resources, education providers http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D809AC-0C35-DCB8-3EC4D8581091F3A6 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D809AC-0C35-DCB8-3EC4D8581091F3A6& GMT Healthfinder.gov index of physical activity information, resources, education providers Health Professional Students for Substance Abuse Training http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D809FA-EED6-DF98-CE9703F164E7D2FC http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D809FA-EED6-DF98-CE9703F164E7D2FC& GMT Health Professional Students for Substance Abuse Training webpage with links to training programs for substance abuse treatment and prevention Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities Training Opportunities http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80A19-AC8B-7412-26510EC4472FC66F http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80A19-AC8B-7412-26510EC4472FC66F& GMT Links to a variety of minority oriented training opportunities for qualified students at all levels of their education in order to increase the capacity of the organizations in which these students will work in the future. Including, American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) Internship Program. YOUR PORTAL TO EPA ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES - High School http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80A67-EDFC-0E62-2E06171FDEA740DB http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80A67-EDFC-0E62-2E06171FDEA740DB& GMT EPA website targeted at Highschool - provides links to environmental information, community service projects, internships, and other educational resources EPA Teaching Center http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80A77-B3AB-DF25-B090F20E0E134B08 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80A77-B3AB-DF25-B090F20E0E134B08& GMT EPA website with curricula and other resources for teaching environmental education National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80AB5-95F7-E44F-239E74C11D789BA8 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80AB5-95F7-E44F-239E74C11D789BA8& GMT NIEHS website with information , resources, curricula and professional development information for teachers The National Environmental Services Center http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80B13-D05D-2198-030D9D1F758B9255 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80B13-D05D-2198-030D9D1F758B9255& GMT Assists small communities by providing training and training-related information and referral services in the areas of wastewater, drinking water, and solid waste Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80B23-0E96-4C9B-D750044F2F646CC3 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80B23-0E96-4C9B-D750044F2F646CC3& GMT website provides information, training, resource, technology to assist Indian tribes in the management of their environmental resources A Health Professional’s Guide to Pediatric Oral Health Management http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80B52-C0EE-B532-18609747214E46C8 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80B52-C0EE-B532-18609747214E46C8& GMT A Health Professional?s Guide to Pediatric Oral Health Management, a series of seven self-contained online modules designed to assist health professionals in managing the oral health of infants and young children Safety Net Dental Clinic Manual http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80B61-C4F2-D573-D8717C3A1067FBFB http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80B61-C4F2-D573-D8717C3A1067FBFB& GMT The information in this comprehensive on-line manual highlights all aspects of dental clinic development as well as ongoing operations. American Dental Hygienists Association http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80C0D-03B3-1DC5-1436D4C4793A330F http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80C0D-03B3-1DC5-1436D4C4793A330F& GMT Continuing education courses on-line in oral health. Crest Dental Oral Health Professional Resources http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80C2C-0ABC-49F1-63D995089123636B http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80C2C-0ABC-49F1-63D995089123636B& GMT Dental Resource Net, Crest Learning Center - provides links to continuing education courses for professionals, information for patients, and information and educational materials for building dental practices Practical Innovations for Dentistry http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80CE8-081C-80FC-AB7DAECB3B4BFC73 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80CE8-081C-80FC-AB7DAECB3B4BFC73& GMT health education products for use by teachers in the classroom NIH Office of Science Education http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80D17-D3F5-1C20-81EC22BA838F2DFD http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80D17-D3F5-1C20-81EC22BA838F2DFD& GMT elementary school curriculum supplementary materials CDC - Promoting Physical Activity - A Guide for Community Action http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80DC2-E745-B718-2707765E81F8BC5F http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80DC2-E745-B718-2707765E81F8BC5F& GMT Promoting Physical Activity - A Guide for Community Action - A Step-by-Step Guide to Communitywide Behavior Change shows you how to facilitate behavior change both from an individual and a community perspective Online Fee Based CME http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80DF1-E109-D3F5-A1056A0304F9BD66 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80DF1-E109-D3F5-A1056A0304F9BD66& GMT web-based courses, CD-ROM software titles, and custom courseware development services for continuing medical education Promoting Health Through Prevention Education and Research http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80E11-FED7-7837-C5718E30510D0C27 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80E11-FED7-7837-C5718E30510D0C27& GMT Medical education materials for vaccine-preventable diseases and vaccination, developed through the Teaching Immunization for Medical Education (TIME) Project, a collaborative initiative of ATPM, the Department of Family Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and CDC. These materials consist of case-based modules, downloadable. Teaching Immunization Delivery and Evaluation http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80E3F-980C-0AF4-572608A547E9DAF7 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80E3F-980C-0AF4-572608A547E9DAF7& GMT Teaching Immunization Delivery and Evaluation (TIDE) is intended to be a flexible tool to teach immunization delivery. It uses clinical scenarios to trigger problem solving and discussion. There are four self-contained modules: Module A: Childhood Immunizations,Module B: Assessing Immunization Rates, Module C: Improving Immunization Rates in Your Practice, Module D: Adolescent Immunizations. California Distance Learning Health Network http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80E5F-AD15-E43B-79000CD53F201E69 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80E5F-AD15-E43B-79000CD53F201E69& GMT The CDLHN Skills Training Institute provides on-site training courses will help your staff learn new techniques and unique approaches to situations. Our customized seminars include: Immunization Skills, Customer Care In the Culture Mix: Skills for Today's Healthcare Providers, and Cultural Diversity. In addition to these established courses, the Skills Training Institute can custom-tailor sessions to meet your specific training needs. Immunization Action Coalition: Vaccination Information for Healthcare Professionals http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80E6E-A603-C814-FA0CC922EC6F9E76 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80E6E-A603-C814-FA0CC922EC6F9E76& GMT The Immunization Action Coalition, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, works to increase immunization rates and prevent disease by creating and distributing educational materials for health professionals and the public that enhance the delivery of safe and effective immunization services. Medicare Quality Improvement Community (MedQIC) Web site http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80E7E-F83D-B319-60B1765EFEE1C9BD http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80E7E-F83D-B319-60B1765EFEE1C9BD& GMT Medicare Quality Improvement Community American Indian/Alaskan Native Adult Immunizations QIOSC Training Materials CDC - The 5 A Day program http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80E9D-B616-AFFF-4C77D52047DEF8C1 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80E9D-B616-AFFF-4C77D52047DEF8C1& GMT The 5 A Day program is an educational program on healthy eating encouraging people to get 5 servings of fruits and vegetable day. The website provides tips on how to incorporate 5 servings into a daily routine, provides healthy recipes, data & statistics, training & tools, publications, & health topics (nutrition, physical activity, obesity). Havard Prevention Research Center on Physical Activity and Nutrition http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80EAD-97FF-2E8F-5CF2F22B6527FBF8 http://www.ihs.gov/oscar/export_pdf.cfm?submission_uuid=92D80EAD-97FF-2E8F-5CF2F22B6527FBF8& GMT An interdisciplinary health curriculum for middle school students that teaches students about nutrition and physical activity. It builds skills and competencies in language, arts, math, science, social studies and physical education.